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Parkinson full range | Gas Lanterns

Maxill appears to be an abbreviation of Maximum Illumination. The Maxill Lamp was designed for main road lighting whilst the Maxilla range of lamps was designed to meet the requirements of the Final Report for Group "B" Lighting (1937) with up to 6 mantles.


Warwick Square
Could be fitted with "Morlite" and Curved Top Adjustable Stainless Steel Reflectors, or with facetted Mirror Glas Reflectors.
??? ??? candle power
3 burners ??? 1936 Advert
1936 Paper
1938 Programme
1937 Advert
1938 Journal



Stechford
This is the Parkinson version of the "shadowless" "Rochester" style of pendant gas-lamp. Could be fitted with Staybrite Steel Back Reflectors for market-place and flood-lighting, or with the new (1936) "butterfly wing" reflector for road lighting. Holophane refractors can also be added.
??? ??? candle power
??? burners ??? 1936 Advert
1936 Paper
1936 Journal
1937 Advert
1938 Journal
1938 Paper



Derby
??? ??? candle power
??? burners ??? 1936 Advert



Maxill Dual Purpose Gas Lamp / Maxill Standard
Believed introduced in 1936 and in two designs. The double reflector was developed after experiments in Bournemout Road, Poole. It quickly became popular for the lighting of arterial roads and new housing estates in the same year. It consists essentially of twin-burners at the foot of paraboloid facetted Staybrite Steel reflectors, which are positioned back-to-back. It was designed to meet the requirements of the MOT's Interim Report, for 18' mounting height, and for central or staggered lighting schemes. Supplied with an even number of mantles from 4 to 12.

It embodies a twin burner of unique patented construction, such that the gas enters an annulus surrounding the mixing chamber, passes vertically downwards to the nipple, and thence upwards, drawing in air from the body of the lamp, the gas and air regulation being effected through the hinged door at the base of the lamp. Each burner is at the focus of a faceted Staybrite steel reflector of paraboloid form. Candle powers of 2000 for the six-light lamp and 3000 for the twelve-light lamp are obtained.

The reflectors are of the dispersive type and are designed to secure evenness of illumination over the carrigeway, rather than a high concentration of candle power in one direction. The patented burner possesses certain interesting features. The gas passes downwards through an annulus to the nipple, and thence upwards into the mixing chamber, drawing in air from the body of the lamp. This ensures efficient combustion and also obviates the necessity for an elaborate ventilating device to prevent the possibility of contamination of the primary air by products of combustion. Moreover, with a bottom door, regulation of the gas and air, replacement of the mantles and cleaning, can all be effected from the base, very important maintenance considerations.

With staggered spacings of 150 feet and for roads of normal width, Class F and E illumination is obtained with the six-light and twelve-light lamps respectively. Mounting heights of 18 to 25 feet for the six-light and 21 to 25 feet for the twelve-light lamp are recommended. The lantern is ususally advertised as achieving a Class F illumination with staggered spacing of 150 feet and a mounting height of 18 to 25 feet.

The reflectors may be set to any reasonable predetermined vertical and azimuthal angle, and are generally adjusted to throw the maximum beam at an azimuthal angle of 10° into the road for staggered systems, and 0° azimuth for central suspension.

The burners and reflectors are housed in a lantern of square cross section, slightly tapering towards the base, and fitted with pyramidal roof and base. From two to sixteen mantles can be housed in the same lantern, a valuable asset when conversions to higher power units are required by increase in traffic and greater necessity for a higher degree of illumination.

Has a maximum candle power of 2000 with a total gas consumption of 15 cubic feet per hour. The two 56-facet Paraboloid Metal Adjustable Refectors are of the dispersive type. The case is of modern design, square in plan, and tapered from the waist downwards. Gas and air regulator is housed in the body of the lamp and free from contamination of the primary air by products of combustion. Provides a good Class F Illumination for roads of normal width. Often shown advertised on Adastra Sectional Steel Columns. Later described as a Group "A" lantern. Is extensively installed, and is ideal for competitive schemes being highly efficient, soundly constructed and low priced.

Redesigned in 1945, it's intended for use in Group A roads at a mounting height of 25'. It houses 6-12 mantles and can be arranged for both suspension or upright mounting. Reflectors can be adjusted horizontally and vertically for even spread of illumination. This adjustability permits the most effective distribution of light for variations in the configuration of the road including bends, gradients and varying road widths.

??? 3000 candle power
2-16 burners Top Entry / Post Top 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Paper
1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Advert
1937 Journal
1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Advert
1938 Programme
1938 Paper
1945 Advert
1945 Programme
1951 Book


Maxill Type "G"
Designed for main and arterial road lighting. First shown at the APLE's Folkestone Conference in 1937. Fitted with a pair of burners (each comprising three to six mantles) fitted at the foci of facetted paraboloid reflectors of anodised aluminium and housed in a square casing of modern design. Each burner is fitted with a separate gas and air regulator and mixing chamber, located in the body of the lamp, obviating any possibility of contamination of the primary air by the products of combustion. The separate gas and air supply to each burner makes for better aeration and a higher efficiency. An important feature of this lamp is the adjustability of the reflectors in both vertical and horizontal planes. Side doors and a bottom door allow for easy cleaning and maintenance. Used for Group "A" Lighting. A most efficient and adaptable unit for street lighting. Square in section, of pleasing design in keeping with modern trends. Each preheater is provided with separate supply pipe with gas and air adjustment ensuring adequate aeration and high efficiency. Twin reflectors of facetted anodised aluminium give very high reflectivity and the greatest possible distribution. The patented reflectors are adjustable in all directions, provision being made for collect distribution of light on acute road bends, a feature not available in any other large gas lamp. The reflectors are of anodised aluminium which combines a high degree or reflectivity with a considerable proportion of diffuse reflection, thus permitting a satisfactory distribution with a minimum of glare. The independent adjustability of the reflectors in both planes renders the lamp idea for roads containing bends and gradients.
2 x 3-6 burners ??? candle power
12 burners ??? 1937 Advert
1937 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Programme
1938 Advert
1939 Advert


Maxilla Brimax Type / Brimax Maxilla
Initially called the Maxilla Brimax Type. Also first called Brimax Type Maxilla Lamp. First shown at the APLE's Folkestone Conference in 1937. Intended for the lighting of residential thoroughfares. It embodies the well-known features of the Maxilla series with a gas and air regulator in the body of the lamp, and concealed together with the clock controller, etc. behind the back reflector. The latter consists of a faceted butterfly wing reflector of anodised aluminium or chromium brass and is supported by a narrower facetted refelctor at the front of the lamp. Used for Group "B" Lighting. A lamp of modern and pleasing design with a swan-neck securely fixed to the waist. It is fitted with two wing reflectors of 16 and 40 facets in paraboloid sections, which correctly distribute the light along the kerb. Gas and air adjustment, controller and igniter are housed behind the larger wing reflector. The case is constructed on similar lines to the larger "Maxill" permitting uniformity in lamp design. The reflectors can be independently adjusted. Also incorporates extended supply tubes as integral parts of the lamps so that an increase in mounting height is obtained without the use of extension pieces. The high distribution obtained has been acheived by the employment of scientifically designed refractors.

Adverts in 1938 state that it's available in Upright (Post Top), Suspension and Brimax Types. The Brimax is the version with the side-entry double-arm bracket.

Redesigned in 1945, the term "Brimax" seems to have been dropped. The lantern is now part of the Maxilla range, for Group "B" lighting at a mounting height of 13-15 feet. The swan neck is an integral part of the lantern. Reflectors can be adjusted vertically for even spread of illumination.

??? ??? candle power
2-6 burners Post Top
Top Entry
"Brimax"
1937 Advert
1937 Journal
1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Advert
1938 Programme
1938 Advert
1939 Programme
1939 Advert
1945 Programme



Maxilla Frog Type / Maxilla Upright
Used for Group "B" lighting. Construced similar to the "Brimax." Can be provied with Frogs from 9" to 3'6" permitting uniformity in mounting height to conform with the Final Report.

Redesigned in 1945, a mounting height of 13-15 feet is suggested for Group "B" roads. Reflectors can be adjusted vertically for even spread of illumination.

??? ??? candle power
2-6 burners Post Top 1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Programme
1945 Advert
1945 Programme
1951 Book
1951 Book
1953 Advert


Maxilla Suspension
Used for Group "B" lighting. Construced similar to the "Brimax."

Redesigned in 1945, a mounting height of 13-15 feet is suggested for Group "B" roads. Reflectors can be adjusted vertically for even spread of illumination.

??? ??? candle power
2-6 burners Top Entry 1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1938 Programme
1945 Advert
1945 Programme
1951 Book


Maxlume
Used for Group "B" Lighting. The reflectors can be independently adjusted. Also incorporates extended supply tubes as integral parts of the lamps so that an increase in mounting height is obtained without the use of extension pieces.
4 burners ??? candle power
??? burners Post Top 1939 Programme
1939 Advert


Maxillette
Used for "Residential Lighting" and service roads. The mounting height of 11-13 feet isn't recommended in the Final Report. Only available as Upright unit. The lantern is square in plan and vertically sided to allow for the incorporation as an integral part of the lantern, all of the reflectors, clock controllers, governing and ignition devices. The controls are concealed behind the reflectors.
??? ??? candle power
1-2 burners Post Top 1945 Advert
1945 Programme



Maxilla Junior
??? ??? candle power
??? burners Top Entry 1951 Book
1953 Advert


Maxilla Festival
??? ??? candle power
4-6 burners Top Entry Public Lighting #74