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sugg full range | gas Lanterns





winsdor lantern | square lamp
Probably the most popular of the square, glazed pane type of lamp. Also known as a "Square Lamp."

In 1945, described as a soundly constructed square lamp with mirror glass faceted reflectors. Its high efficiency, storm-proofing and ease of maintenance were its main features. Quite suitable for Group "B" lighting schemes.

Windsor ??? candle power
4 burners Post Top 1932 Catalogue
1936 Paper
1940 Advert
1944 Journal
1945 programme
1947 Journal
1947 Paper



Winsdor Lantern (With Standard Gas Industry Fitting)
For war-time use and complies with BS/ARP 37. The Windsor is fitted with the Standard Gas Industry ftting for Starlite lighting. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.
Windsor ??? candle power
1 burner Post Top 1940 Journal



Winsdor Lantern (With New Gas Industry Fitting)
A new low-light conversion unit to conform to the lighting restrictions. Designed by the Gas Light and Coke Company in their Watson House laboratories. It gives the allowable ARP light output, but does so with about a third of the gas used in earlier units, and requires only about a fourth of the amount of metal used for standard fittings. Designed for war-time use, the unit is capable of meeting a variety of peace-time conditions as it is applicable not only to ARP street lighting but for the illumination of bollards or street signs where a source of low intensity is required. The light output is secured with a gas consumption of 0.6/0.7 cu. ft. per hour, as compared with the 1.6 cu. ft. per hour with the standard ARP fitting. Bearing in mind that under existing labour conditions it is not possible or economical to light and extinguish ARP fittings each day, the overall economy in gas is considerable, both for the local authority and from the point of view of national fuel economy. Four of the new units can be made out of the metal required to produce a single unit of the existing type. In place of the usual bunsen burner and standard mantle, a non-aerated burner and specially designed mantle are employed. The ordinary bunsen burner with mantle is unsuitable for gas rates of the order of 0.5/1 cu. ft. per hour. (It is difficult to make small mantles of robust constuction and the expense involved in making aerated burners with controls machined to the required accuracy is too high. At low gas rates, the performance of a bunsen burner is liable to be adversely affected by foreign matter carried in the gas stream or primary air - this leads to instability and considerable variation in the total light output from the source.) A non-aerated burner with a fine orifice operates at the full service pressure of the gas. This rat-tail burner, with a non-luminous tip, is allowed to impinge on the mantle of special design and produce a suitable source of light for ARP and other purposes. Satisfactory results are obtained with the flames directed nearly vertically upwards onto a flat mantle. A 3-hole burner is used and found to be the most satisfactory, and the division of the gas rate into 3 ensures that each flame is highly aerated. The distribution of light is obtained by surrounding the light source with a glass chimney, on which is stencilled a mask of the necessary design to obscure the unwanted light flux and control the candle power in the required directions.
Windsor ??? candle power
1 burner Post Top 1944 Journal







rochester / rochester suspension unit
The firm claimed to be the originators of this type of lantern. Available in "upright" or "suspension" options. Could take 4-8 mantles, with either single or dual supplies, and with clustered or "in-line" arranagements. Could also be supplied with either: "Multi-ray" reflector; "K" or "S" type Directional Reflector; Holophane Dish and or Band refractors. Clock controller, governor and/or controller could be fitted in the base. Was the lantern of choice for the City of Westminster and was installed on the Great West Road in 1936.

Could be modified to comply with British Standard Specification BS/ARP37 so as to convert the lantern for war-time use. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.

This was one of the models selected for immediate post-war production.

In 1945, it has a variety of applications in either Upright or Suspension form and can be applied in most street lighting scheme. It meets the requirements of the Ministry Of Transport's Final Report. The specially constructed stormproof casing and remarkably high efficiency has produced a splended record of trouble-free service with a minimum of maintenace costs.

In 1948, this lantern has been used for many years for Public Lighting and is equally popular for other types of outdoor lighting requirements.

??? ??? candle power
1-15 burners Top Entry / Post Top 1928 Journal
1932 Catalogue
1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1936 Paper
1936 Journal
1937 advert
1938 Journal
1938 programme
1938 Advert
1938 Paper
1939 Journal
1939 programme
1940 Advert
1944 Journal
1945 programme
1946 programme
1947 Programme
1947 Paper
1948 Programme



Rochester Lantern (with Standard Gas Industry fitting)
For war-time use and complies with BS/ARP 37. The Rochester is fitted with the Standard Gas Industry ftting for Starlite lighting. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.
??? ??? candle power
1 burner Top Entry / Post Top 1940 Journal



Promenade Lantern
Uses the bowl form of glassware like the Rochester, but is made on plainer and more economical lines.
Promenade ??? candle power
3 burners Top Entry 1932 catalogue


Littleton / Littleton Suspension Unit
A specialised lantern. The 1-light lamp with a ruby globe is used for road crossings and danger spots, whilst a 3-light suspension version with adjustable, chromium plated, parabolic reflector is used to light important road signs. This was one of the models selected for immediate post-war production.

Littleton ??? candle power
1-9 burners Top Entry 1928 Journal
1932 catalogue
1944 Journal


Back Lantern
Wall fixed lantern used for lighing subways etc.
1548 ??? candle power
??? burners Wall mount 1932 catalogue


Hollyhead
A bracket fixing model for porches, passage ways, etc.
Hollyhead ??? candle power
??? burners Bracket mount 1932 catalogue



london c pattern lamp
The London lamp was desgined to break away from the conventional shape of gas lamps and to incorporate within the lines of the unit all the necessary reflector equipment. The great advances made in the manufacture of heat resisting backing for mirrors enables mirror glass reflectors to be employed with consequent high reflection efficiency. Ventilation on the Venturi flue principle not only reduces the overall height of the lamp, but in conjunction with the patent improved air-gas mixing arrangements increases the lumen output of the light source. The "C" pattern lamp incorporates within the design of the unit accommodation for the clock controller, pressure governor and igniter. The reflector system is similar to the "B/2" pattern.
London C ??? candle power
12 burners Top Entry 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1936 Paper
1936 Journal






london b/2 pattern lamp
The London B/2 was described as new in 1937, although it was being installed in 1936 and described as "widely used." It replaced the picture of the "C" pattern lamp in "The London Lamp" advertisement in September 1936. (The B/2 probably designates the use of number 2 mantles). It was of simplier construction and more universal application. A reflector system similar to the "C" pattern lamp is incorporated. The design of the reflector equipment is such that the candle-power at angles very near to, or above, the horizontal, is low; by this means glare in the normal line of vision is reduced to a minimum and the flux utilisation of the source is high. The only adjustment provided on the reflectors raises or lowers the angle of maximum intensity to suit various spacing height ratios, and to obtain a compromise between reasonable test point illumination and road surface brightness.
It was described as "self-focussing" and was fitted with a unique reflector system which gave excellent visibility and reduced glare. The use of shaped glass reflectors gave a very high degree of light control without undue absorption. A low-pressure unit with a streamline flow superheater carrying six, eight or twelve No. 2 mantles in alignment. Special mirror trough reflectors with heat resisting backing are used to give a wide distribution up and down the road. The "Venturi" type flue reduces the height of the lantern, and ensures steady burning udner the most adverse weather conditions. The burner incorporates a novel air control resulting in a very efficient light output.
For use in "busy" streets. It was exhibited at the APLE's 1937 conference at a spacing of 135' staggered, 25' height and giving a Class "D" classification. The lamps were adjusted to give a good compromise between surface brightness and horizontal illumination. In 1937, the lantern is available in four sizes. The mantles are arranged in line, the directional equipment consisting of special heat resisting mirror glass troughs of parabolic section. The reflector system is held in a rigid frame which also carries a compensating plane refelctor. The function of this compensating reflector is to redirect the light that would otherwise be wasted above the horizontal on the road surface adjacent to the lamp. Its output was increased in 1938 by a new burner design which gives an exact air adjustment and the optimal gas-air mixture for gases of different composition. By 1945, the lantern had been extensively used, now being built in accordance with the MOT's Final Report for Group "A" lighting. Has a special mirror glass optical system which can easily and accurately adjusted to suit any change of gradient in the road. Alternative Special Reflector Systems could be supplied to give either a low cut-off system or a back refelctor for unilateral distribution.

Adjustment of reflector system in situ: The rigid frames are pivoted and the angle of maximum intensity can be adjusted locally by means of two lead screws shown at B, B, which pivot the frames independently. The reflector system is thus adjustable to secure the optimum result for the particular system.

This was one of the models selected for immediate post-war production. Has a 'Type 1 Distribution' (Non Cut-Off) according to the draft 1945 specification; and can be adjusted to a 'Type 2 Distribution' (Semi Cut-Off) with adjustment.

London B/2 ??? candle power
6, 8, 10 or 12 burners Top Entry 1936 Journal
1936 Paper
1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1937 Advert
1937 Programme
1937 Paper
1937 Journal
1938 Journal
1938 advert
1938 programme
1938 Paper
1939 Journal
1939 Journal
1939 programme
1939 advert
1940 Advert
1942 Journal
1944 Journal
1945 programme
1945 Paper
1947 Paper




london b pattern lamp (with standard gas industry fitting)
For war-time use and complies with BS/ARP 37. The London is fitted with the Standard Gas Industry ftting for Starlite lighting. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.
??? ??? candle power
1 burner Top Entry / Post Top 1940 Journal



Supervia
Described as a low-pressure version. Perhaps made under license.

Could be modified to comply with British Standard Specification BS/ARP37 so as to convert the lantern for war-time use. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.

Supervia ??? candle power
??? burners Top Entry 1936 Journal
1940 Advert


High Visibility / H. V. Lamp
First exhibited and installed in prototype form at the APLE's 1937 Conference in Folkestone. Originally called the "H. V. Lamp" which could stand for "High Visibility." The exterior of the final model was to be considerably modified, but the redirective equipment was to be retained unaltered. The lamp used specially designed mirror glass reflectors (Zeiss Directional Reflector) giving a complete cut-off below the horizontal, together with an axial beam intensity at angles of 60°-70°. The type of distribution ensured that a much greater proportion of the total flux reached the road surface, resulting in higher illumination for a given gas consumption. And the design of the lamp such that its weight for a given light output had been considerably reduced making it possible to suspend two or three lamps on a single span wire. It was the prototype of the "Folkestone" lantern - see below.
High Visibility ??? candle power
??? burners ??? 1937 Programme
1937 Paper
1937 Journal




Folkestone Lantern
First exhbitied in embryo form at the APLE's 1937 conference in Folkestone as the HV Lamp. Even though conference literature suggested the lamp would be externally redesigned - but retaining the optical system - the lamp appeared for sale, now called the "Folkestone" lamp, the same month. The design was perfected in 1938. It was of the "cut-off" type and installations were characterised by an entire absence of glare and amazing visibility. Especially suited for central suspension. Two sizes were made post-war: 4-light No. 2 mantle burners and 6-light No.2 mantle burners.

Has a 'Type 3 Distribution' (Cut-Off) according to the draft 1945 specification.

Folkestone ??? candle power
4, 6 burners Top Entry 1937 Advert
1937 Journal
1937 Advert
1939 Journal
1938 programme
1944 Journal
1945 Paper
1951 book






series 8000
Designed primarily for Group B roads. The whole of the body of the lamp is cast aluminium. It is arranged as a unit with a Wrought Iron Swanneck and Controller Base, the control equipment being housed in a lifting sheet-iron cover. THe Lamp is fitted with curved mirror glass reflectors. A three-way version for Group "B" lighting at junctions was introduced in 1938. Two of the swan neck options are the 'B' type and 'D' type. Tests have proved that the efficiency of the "8000" Lamp referred to the total lantern lumen output per c. ft. of gas consumed, is considerably greater than that of any other low pressure gas unit of normal design at present available. This high burner efficiency is obtained with silk mantles or normal impregnation. Low in maintenance costs and designed to give a long and satisfactory service. Redesigned after the war. With various lengths of swan-necks available ('D', 'E' and 'F') then can be adapted to existing columns. (In 1948, only 'D' was mentioned for conversion. The 'D' type with the familiar swan-neck mounting represents by far the most effective and economical way of converting existing short post gas lighting installations to meet modern requirements).

In 1946, the 8000 lamp is shown with two distinct forms of mounting. In one case it constitutes the ideal conversion unit for bringing old gas installations up to date at the lowest possible cost. With the new Sugg C.U. concrete bracket ('G') and column it provides a completely modern lighting unit, suitable for new housing schemes. The clean outline of this design will appeal to all as a great improvement in appearance. The high efficiency of the lighting unit is already well known, and some detail improvements recently made have reduced maintenance costs still further. Also, the burners were given a "streamlined interior" which gave 240 lumens per cubic foot of gas per hour (as compared to 220/230).

It is built up on a one-piece light alloy casting approximately 1/8" thick. The burner can be entirely cleaned internally without major dismantling and can be put back into lighting without even a fractional change in its adjustment. The 5½ square feet of glass of the traditional lantern is replaced by a small heat-resisting globe completely detachable for cleaning. The reflectors, of a well-known type, do not tend to collect dirt and are readily restored to their new condition by wiping, having a smooth-glass-surface and being very rigidly mounted.

In 1947, the 8000 was exhibited with three different mounting types: 'G' type Sugg C.U. Concrete Bracket (for concrete columns); 'H' type for steel pole columns (both providing integral housing for the control equipment); and the original 'D' type with swan-neck fitting for converting existing short post gas lighting installations to meet modern needs. Many thousands of 8000 lamps now installed have earned a reputation for effective lighting and reliability of operation and economy of maintenance.

8000 ??? candle power
2, 3 or 4 burners Top Entry 1937 programme
1938 journal
1938 advert
1939 advert
1938 paper
1940 advert
1944 journal
1946 advert
1946 paper
1947 advert
1947 advert
1947 Programme
1947 advert
1947 Journal
1947 advert
1947 Paper
1948 Programme
1951 Book
1951 Book
Public Lighting #77


series 8000 lantern (with standard gas industry fitting)
For war-time use and complies with BS/ARP 37. The Series 8000 is fitted with the Standard Gas Industry ftting for Starlite lighting. In this configuration, it could only output 0.0002 foot candles.
??? ??? candle power
1 burner Top Entry / Post Top 1940 Journal



highway lantern
Designed in 1939 and exhibited at the APLE's conference the same year. The reflector system embodies paraboloid reflectors giving a distribution of light adequately wide for all normal roads, with a polar distribution particularly suited to the production of high road brightness but at the same time controlled to prevent excessive glare. The reflector system has a low absoprtion giving high total lantern lumen output. The burners carry twelve mantles in a special arrangement of two rows, and project considerably below the flat top reflector. The anodised aluminium specular reflector system consists of two complete reflector units and mountings, each adjustable over a wide range horizontally and also vertically if necessary. These units are easily removed, and the burner can then be detached for maintenance. Designed for Group A lighting at 25', 5' overhang up to road widths of 40'. A novel point on the lamp is that it has been found possible for the first time to calibrate the reflector mounting in degrees laterally, thereby greatly simplifying their adjustment. The lamp body has four doors, self-supporting when open, for easy of maintenance. The whole top of the lantern is made from copper, and the basket is also incorrodible.

The lantern is constructed on modern lines in the form of a heavy gauge top, rectangular in plan, which incorporates the flue, burner and mantles; an enamelled iron top reflector supports the directive equipment, and the non-corrosive glazed body has four access doors. The reflector system embodies the use of paraboloid reflectors with the object of providing a distribution of light adequately wide for all normal roads, and with a polar distribution particularly suited to the production of high road brightness without excessive glare and giving a high lantern lumen output. The burner is normally fitted with twelve mantles arranged in two rows, and it projects somewhat below the flat top reflector. The anodized aluminium specular reflector units and mountings are each adjustable over a wide range horizontally, so that the direction of the maximum intensity can be set to the best advantage, both on straight and curved roads. The vertical angle can also be adjusted if this is necessary. The reflector unit can be very easily removed and the whole burner system is then detachable for maintenance, etc.

??? ??? candle power
12 burners ??? 1939 Catalogue
1939 Paper




london b/3 pattern lamp
Introduced in 1946. It includes improved modifications to the top casing, and is being extensively used for modern street lighting, being primarily designed for Group 'A' schemes. It has a special mirror glass optical system, which can be very easily and accurately adjusted to obtain the best result according to the nature of the surface of the road. Alternatively, special reflector systems can be supplied, these being a low cut-off system, and a back reflector to give unilateral distribution.

In later 1946, the ventilation system was improved and therefore the consistency of performance. A test of 12 lanterns showed that, on a rated peak candle power of 3000, the variation due to manufacture was only 5%. The construction is mostly of sheet copper and the reflectors are glass-surfaced. Also, the burners were given a "streamlined interior" which gave 240 lumens per cubic foot of gas per hour (as compared to 220/230).

London B/3 ??? candle power
6 burners Top Entry 1946 programme
1946 paper
1949 advert
1951 book
1951 book
1953 advert


London B/3 ??? candle power
8 burners Top Entry 1946 programme
1946 paper
1949 advert
1951 book
1951 book
1953 advert


London B/3 ??? candle power
10 burners Top Entry 1946 programme
1946 paper
1949 advert
1951 book
1951 book
1953 advert


London B/3 ??? candle power
12 burners Top Entry 1946 programme
1946 paper
1949 advert
1951 book
1951 book
1953 advert









southport (group a)
First demonstrated at the APLE's Conference in Southport in 1947. Developed with the Southport Corporation Gas Department. Possesses many new features in a design of marked simplicity. Available in single unit and double unit forms. The double unit form was designed for Group A and is suitable for main traffic routes or shopping centres. The lantern is mounted directly to the horizontal bracket arm, the vertical distance of the light-source below the bracket being 9" only.

The unit shown at Southport Corporation Gas Department, and by arrangement with the South Metropolitan Gas Company was fitted with the low-pressure 'Supervia' strip mantle. It will also be available fitted with ordinary medium mantles in cluster formation. Separate supplies are taken to each of the two burners from the dual supply Horstmann Controller. This permits the reduction of power of the lamps by 50% at midnight if required.

A modern form of light distribution designed to give even road surface brightness and good visibility without excessive glare is produced by the specially designed Holophane refractor plates which have oval prisms of graduated shape. These give a lateral spread to the light distribution whihc is valuable in lighting curved roads or open spaces.

The refractors are smooth on one side and the prismatic surfces are protected by smooth cover glasses to facilitate cleaning. The burners used are of the dual injector "Aeromatic" type which render them completely stable in operation under all normal circumstances.


After the war, the question of renewals became an urgent priorty. Southport required something special in the direction of street lighting for more important thoroughfares. Various manufacturers were approached by the Gas Department and one company was found (Sugg) which was engaged on the development (in conjunction with Holophane) of a panel refractor lantern or radically new design and attractive appearance. After considerable modification and introduction of special features suggested by the Southport Corporation Gas Department, new Group A and Group B units were evolved, subjected to extensive trials, and it is now known as the Southport Lamp. Detailed consideration was given to the particular requirements i.e. intensity of lighting, mounting and control facilities, and the idea was originated of mounting the new lamp in double units, clamped directly onto the horizontal bracket arms and with a control mechanism housed on the column end of the unit. Thsi form of mounting provided the most flexible design for varying degrees of overhang, particularly essential for use in tree-lined roads, and provided a standard self-contained lighting unit requiring only the connection of a gas supply to the bracket arm, there being no accessories within the column base.

Meanwhile with the assistance of the South Metropolitan Gas Company, a number of small lighting units of the Supervia type were installed at 15ft. mounting heights on the swan necks fitted to existing columns in certain streets. These lamps used the well-known Supervia strip-mantles in conjunction with the Holophane refracting dish and were an immediate success. It was therefore decided to adopt this type of burner in conjunction with the Southport Lamp and encouragement being received from the South Metropolitan Gas Company in this project, it was successfully carried out. Six mantles, three to each burner of the lamp, were fitted.

The basic design of the unit being therefore evolved, various refinements were incorporated by the makers to facilitate maintenance. The burner equipment was arranged to be removeable by slakening one union only. The prismatic surfaces of the refractor were protected by cover glasses so that smooth surfaces only were presented for cleaning, and some features were included to ensure satisfactory operation under exceptionally cold weather conditions and to provide excellent access to all components.

The polar distribution curve of the lamp shows a distribution peak of 4,500 candle power at an angle of 10° below horizontal; that the candle power above 80° runs back sharply to reduce glare effects and very little light is emitted above the horizontal. The polar curve below the angle of peak power is modified by graduation of the prisms in the refractors, and near to the lamp, the prismatic bottom glasses take over the distribution duties gradually from the main Holophane refractor plates in the doors. Adequate lateral spread of the light is ensured by the oval refractor prisms and the linear shape of the source employed. The ends of the lamp are glazed with fluted glass and the different is such that no direct view of the source is obtainable from street level.

A keynote of the design is simplicity of construction and maintenance.

In 1948, it's being described as a double-unit suitable for main traffic routes or shopping centres. It is fitted with two burners, each carrying six medium size mantles in staggered formation, a separate supply being taken to each of the burners from the dual supply Horstmann Controller. This construction permits of the reduction of the power of the lamps by 50% at midnight. It's normally mounted by clamping it directly to a horizontal bracket arm. The lamp can also be used with raising and lowering gear. The Holophane refractor plates have been specially designed to give even road surface brightness and good visibility without excessive glare. They have oval prisms of graduated shape which give a lateral spread to the light distribution which is valuable in lighting curved roads or open spaces. The prismatic surfaces are protected by smooth cover glasses to facilitate cleaning. The burners used incorporate the "Aeromatic" double-injector principle, which completely eliminiates the possibility of back-firing to the ejector.

Southport (Group A) ??? candle power
8, 10 or 12 burners Top Entry
Post Top
1947 Programme
1947 Journal
1948 Programme
1951 book
1951 book
1951 Advert
Public Lighting #77


refractor panel lantern / southport (group b)
Prototype lantern (called the Refractor Panel Lantern) illustrated in a paper in 1946. The prototype is constructed entirely in light alloy castings. The lantern is design to accommodate a range of light sources and control of the light is effected by specially developed Holophane refractor plates on the doors. Maintenance is facilitated by the use of cover glasses over the prisms of the refractors so that only smooth surfaces of glass have to be cleaned. The control equipment for this lantern is housed in a small box on the side which, for many purposes, is conveniently clamped direct to the column.

Entirely of post-war design and will shortly be available (1946).

Was eventually designed with two units (for a Southport Group A) and a single unit (for a Southport Group B). See SouthPort (Group A) for more information about the design of the lantern post 1946.

In 1948, this single unit was being described as having similar features to the double-unit (see above). The main differences being in the number of mantles employed and in certain simplification in construction which is permissible when the unit is used at a lower mounting height. Provides lighting to the higher limits of Group 'B'.

Southport (Group B) ??? candle power
4 or 6 burners Post Top 1946 paper
1948 Programme
1951 book
1953 advert