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restorations : siemens crawley
This lantern originally stood in a petrol station in Stafford. Rescued, it ended up in my collection in a completely unknown state with much of the internals of the original concrete bracket still attached to it. And whilst complete, it was in a very dirty state.

Nothing for it - complete strip down and rebuild.

Note: WD40 is shown in the early pictures to loosen bolts. It is now not recommended for restoration work. Please use a different penetrating oil


before restoration
The lantern was complete (a little too complete with part of the bracket still stuck in it) and very dirty.




opening the canopy
Gently the large thumb-screw holding the bowl in place was undone and removed.




bowl open #1
Opening the bowl on a very stiff hinge revealed two fluorescent tubes and a very rusty metal reflector.




bowl open #2
All hinges, bolts, screws and other fixtures were given a liberal dose with a penetrating oil (not WD40 - which is evil stuff).




bowl open #3
The fluorescent tubes were removed - one was found to be broken and discarded. I'll attempt to get the other one working.




bowl removal #1
The bowl was fragile and getting in the way. The nut and bolt assemblies holding the bowl in place were rusted and unworkable. So, using a Dremel, I cut off the bolt heads and removed the bowl that way. It'll need new nuts and bolts, but the existing ones were too far gone to repair.




grub screw removal #1
The allen grub screws were removed using lots of penetrating oil, lots of heat, and finally some extra torque with the patented "copper pipe in the allen key handle" method. Did the remains of the iron interior of the column then drop out? Of course not. It's never that easy.




reflector removal #1
The four screws holding the reflector were coaxed out with a screwdriver, penetrating oil and a little heat. Underneath, the rusty gear could be seen, along with lots of dirt.