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installations: remaining gas lanterns in the uk

Westminster, London: There’s a piece on p23 of the current issue (29 November 2021) on Westminster City Council's proposal to remove the remaining 299 gas street lamps in their care and replace them with LED replicas. Local heritage groups are unhappy about this. In so far as it's a response to global warming it's understandable, but in terms of CO2 emissions its impact wouldn't be that significant. These aren't of course the only remaining gas lamps in London, but I think Westminster has the largest collection of them. The ones in and around Covent Garden are particularly noteworthy.


Malvern: A voluntary group has been formed to look after the surviving gas lamps in Malvern. There's a brief summary of their work here: The Malvern Gaslamps - All About Malvern Hills. There’s around 100 of them still in use. From photographs, and a brief tour on Google Streetview, they appear mostly to be a mix of Sugg Windsors, Foster & Pullen Avils and Parkinson Maxillas. They are described by journalists and others as a Victorian survival, but really they are representative of 1940s and 1950s practice, except that the burners have been modified to improve their efficiency.


Park Estate, Nottingham: The 226 gas street lamps here appear to be well looked after. As it’s served by a network of private roads most of the area is inaccessible on Google Streetview but you can see into it in a few places.


Cambridge: A number of private streets (Barrow Road, Latham Road, Claremont and Millington Road) are still lit by gas. The columns and lanterns were reburbished in the 2000s by Sugg and Cambridge City Council and all the lanterns are now modern Sugg Windsors.


Carlisle Castle, Carlisle: About half a dozen lamps survive, two on the approach road to the main gate and the rest within the Parade Ground. They are the property of English Heritage, who don't currently appear to do any maintenance on them, except that one wall mounted example has been replaced with an electric replica. Because of this I doubt if they can be regarded as being in working order.


Keighley & Worth Valley Railway: Last time I went there, which admittedly was a few years ago, there was a good set of gas lamps at Oxenhope station.


Leeds: There is a small number of working gas lamps in the city centre, mostly in Queen Square. They appear to have been restored relatively recently.


York: – A few gas lamps survive in a few tourist oriented places, for example outside the Minster. They appear to be well looked after.


Peter Rivet
October 2021


ESLA Bi-Multi Group 'A' 2-way in Wimbledon Thorn Beta 5 mounted on a Concrete Utilities 2D concrete bracket and column in Epsom installations: ancient

  1. Blackpool/Fleetwood: Fluorescents
    A collection of Group-A and Group-B fluorescent lanterns taken in the 1960s.

  2. Cambridge: Old Installations
    Before the Candles, before REVO and before BTH, Cambridge was lit by gas. Pete Rivet tracks down some archival photographs.

  3. Cheam: ESLAs
    From my original site, here's the only documentation of a huge ESLA installation from South London.

  4. York: REVO Festivals
    For years, a small collection of these lanterns lit the approach to York Minster.

  5. Dreadful
    Some pictures of some rather dubious street lights from the past.




installations: current

  1. Barnstaple: GEC/REVO
    An attempt to recreate the 'original' installation - which partly succeeds.

  2. Beckenham: ESLA
    A unique installation surviving on a private street in Beckenham, South London.

  3. Bolton: REVO
    Pictures taken in 1990 of the old REVO installation still lighting the streets.

  4. Cambridge: Richardson Candles
    The unique, bespoke, architect designed Richardson Candles of Cambridge.

  5. Cambridge: Lanterns
    But there's more in Cambridge than the Candles.

  6. Canterbury: Lanterns
    Pictures of surviving ESLA Bi-Multis in Canterbury.

  7. Cannock: REVO
    Three REVO Lodestars still survive in Cannock.

  8. Folkestone: REVO
    Until recently, the side-streets of Folkestone were lit with antique REVO street lights.

  9. Haywards Heath: GEC
    One of the last Group-A fluorescent installations in the country.

  10. Kings Lynn: ESLA
    I really, really could not believe this! Sodium ESLAs still in service.

  11. Merton Park/Epsom/Ewell: ESLA/REVO
    Lee Gale has discovered several 'rescued' lanterns and columns around Merton Park in South London.

  12. REVO City: REVO/ELECO/GEC/Thorn
    A 1930s REVO installation can still be picked out in the back streets of REVO City

  13. Tooting: Gas lanterns
    It's not difficult to find interesting lanterns in Tooting; just walk out of the tube station.

  14. Wimbledon: ESLA/REVO
    Tucked away in the back streets of Wimbledon, treasures can still be found.




installations: general

Instead of grouping old streetlights together by location, here they're grouped by category.

  1. Concrete Columns And Brackets
    Concrete streetlights are becoming rarer and rarer. Here's a picture of some forgotten ones.

  1. Cast Iron Columns And Brackets
    Similarly unspoilt cast iron columns, brackets and lanterns are also becoming depressingly rare. Here's some examples from around the country.




installations: refurbishments

These two installations are unique. The first is a refurbishment of a pole-mounted 35W SOX scheme, proving that with a bit of time and effort, old lanterns can be restored to as good-as-new.

The second is a trial installation in a village for a Parish Council. By taking old 1950s refractor lanterns, and installing state-of-the-art metal halide technology, the scheme is an interesting mesh of old and new.

  1. 35W SOX Reburbishment Scheme
  2. 70W MBI Replacement Scheme



installations: museums/collections

There are several museums and/or collections of older lanterns, brackets and columns. In time, I'll document all those known.

  1. Concrete Utilities' Museum Of Street Lighting
  2. Stratford-On-Avon Collection
  3. Dublin collection



installations: urban exploration

I'm a keen urban explorer. My adventures (and misadventures) can be read on my urban exploration website. However, whilst exploring I often come across various street lights which are of interest.

  1. Stewartby Brickworks
  2. Croxley Green To Watford
  3. Location #1
  4. Location #2
  5. RAF Wyton Bomb Store



installations: modifications

Sometimes street lighting columns are used (or disguised) for other uses.

  1. BT Mobile Phone Masts



A1 (Great North Road) Detailed survey of the lighting of the Great North Road in the County of Durham showing the differences of lighting supplied by the separate 19 Lighting Authorities which light that section of the road. 1936 Journal
A4 (Great West Road) Some miles stretching from Brentford lit with Sugg Rochester lanterns. They're carried on centrally mounted columns with two bracket arms. (Journal includes day picture). 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
A4 (Great West Road) New lighting is installed immediately post-war. It is lit by a conventional centre and opposite lighting scheme. Caternary Lighting On The Great West Road, 1974
A4 (Great West Road) The lighting is partially modified in 1959. Caternary Lighting On The Great West Road, 1974
A4 (Great West Road) The Hounslow section of the A4 is lit by a catenary scheme in 1971. This is the first to be installed on an existing trunk road which carries a heavy volume of traffic. It introduces high levels of illumination in place of silhouette vision. At night the axial view of the lamp reduces disability glare to a minimum whilst the kerbs are well defined and vehicles and pedestrians are "modelled." The motorist does not suffer from constantly changing degress of brightness but experiences complete uniformity of illumination. Because the lanterns are suspended axially from longitudinal catenary cables over the central reservation, the road is clearly defined for a considerable distance ahead and this greater visibility is particularly noticeable in wet weather. Verge columns have been completely eliminated which, in turn, offers several advantages in that it reduces maintenance to a minimum and keeps the cost down by reducing the number of electrical connections. Catenary lighting is also aesthetically more pleasing by day and night alike in that fewer vertical supports are needed which, in turn, makes for fewer distractions.

The total width of the highway is 120'. The carriageways are surfaced in hot rolled asphalt, the cycle tracks in concrete and the footpaths are slab paving.

In 1968 the Department of the Environment asked the Borough Council to prepare a new lighting scheme for the Great West Road on a conventional basis of centre reservation and opposite lighting. By that time, catenary systems in Holland had been visited and although the A4 was an existing dual carriageway road with all its complications, it did lend itself to catenary lighting. It was also an experiment to assess the merits or demerits of such a form of lighting. The London Highways Division of the Department of the Environment also agreed.

A fixed wire system with 120 centrally mounted columns with 563 lanterns along a 9.5km stretch of road which replaced 300 columns and 444 lanterns. Column spacing approx 70m with 5 lanterns per span except on some bends. Lantern mounting height is 10m and each lantern houses a 135W SOX lamp. Columns: Length of 14.3m above ground and would need to support 5 lanterns per 70m span at a mounting height of 10m. The columns were steel and made by Petitjean Co. Ltd. Octagonal in shape with continious taper from base to top. Each column has a base plate providing for 8 bolts per pate and as electricity was fed into each alternative column, doors were only provided when necessary.

Lanterns: Side entry, totally enclosed, reflector type for cut-off light distribution roughly in accordance with BS. 1788. The lanterns were made by Philips Electrical Limited. The lanterns had integral control gear. Lighting controlled by photo-electric cells mounted on the canopy of each lantern and is of the standard lock plug socket type. Units switch on at 70 lux and have a switch-on to switch-off ratio of 1 to 2.

Catenary Cables: Designed to be capable of supporting all the loadings required, together with allowance for the additional weight and wind surface area.

The contractor was David Webster Limited and was restricted to working only between the hours of 9:30 and 4:30. The police were very insistent that the works should interfere with the flow of traffic as little as possible.

Catenary is a form of lighting which has many advantages and little disadvantages. It has a future for dual-carriageways and motorways. Maintenance is more economical as there are fewer columns and all cleaning and bulk changing can be carried out from one carriageway. This is an advantage on the A4 which suffers from tidal flows. As far as painting is concerned there are a 1/5 the number of columns compared to a conventional opposite layout and 2/5ths in the case of centre double arm columns. However the size of column is greater so the net saving is in the order of 60% and 30% respectively. For bulk changing and cleaning it has been found that 10% more lanterns can be dealt with per day. However the cost of installation is more expensive than a conventional system. During the four winter months (October - January) there has been a significant reduction in road accidents - around 50%. Given the cost of accidents, the scheme has almost paid for itself. (Such a 50% reduction is usually expected when lighting an unlit road with a speed limit of 70MPH - in the case of roads with a speed limit, like the A4, one expects a 33% reduction).

After this scheme, the Department of the Environment agreed to a further scheme of catenary lighting in conjunction with the dualling of a length of the A30 Trunk Road (Great South West Road) within the Borough. The scheme is, at present, under design and it's proposed to install a running wire system rather than a fixed wire system.

Caternary Lighting On The Great West Road, 1974
A6 (Northern Portion, Lancaster) One mile has now been lit with 250W electric discharge lamps. 1936 Journal
M4 (Elevated Section, Chiswick to Langley) The GEC install the first motorway lighting installation in the U.K. along the elevated section in 1964. 200W linear sodium lamp lanterns are used. Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Cumblerland New gas street lighting will be installed in the parishes of Keekle, Newmills, Barnard Castle, Aberdour, Crossgates, Fordell, North Peterton and Coatbridge. About 1280 lamps are affected by this ten year contract. 1937 Journal
Essex In July 1940, it was reported to Essex County Council that, arising out of an accident at a road junction, one of the illuminated bollards was damaged, resulting in the lights of the remaining bollards being extinguished. The County Surveyor suggested the desirability of alterations being made to the lighting systems of traffic roundabouts in order that in the event of a single bollard being damaged, the ligthing of the remaing signs would not be affected. The Council agreed to the Surveyor's recommendation, provided a grant of 60% was made by the M.O.T.. Subsequently the Ministry Of War Transport stated that it thought the alterations was hardly justified and could not be regarded as either economical or urgently required. The County Council passed a resolution to undertake the work at their own expense. 1942 Journal
Lanarkshire All district lighting authorities have been merged into one County Council area with one lighting department and one lighting engineer in charge. 1943 Paper
Renfrewshire The County Council has renewed its gas lighting contracts for the districts of Linwood, Eldeslie, Potterhill and Cardonald. About 258 lamps are covered by the agreements. 1938 Journal
Surrey All island refuges on all new by-pass roads are equiped with Radiovisor Bridge light-actuated control units. 1936 Journal
West Lothian The number of new 10-year contracts for gas lighting affect various villages in West Lothian. Among the authorities concerned are: the Burgh of Whitburn and the West Lothian County Council and parishes including Blackburn, East Whitburn and Stoneyburn. 1938 Journal
Gas Light And Coke Company, London Founded by Winsor who originally installed the first gas lamps down Pall Mall. 1941 Journal
Gas Light And Coke Company, London At their annual general meeting it was stated that during the past twelve months the Company was granted two 15-year, five 10-year and three 5-year agreements for gas street lighting. The sale of gas for this purpose showed and increase of some 130,000 therms as compared with the preceding year. 1938 Journal
Gas Light And Coke Company, London The number of street lamps in use in the company's area has increased from 49,537 in 1932 to 52,430 at the beginning of this year, an increase of 5.8% in five years, while the number of therms used has increased 21.5% in the five years. 1938 Journal
North Metropolitan Area, London The North Metropoltan Electric Power Supply Co., covers a distribution area which includes various north and north-west London districts and parts of Hertfordshire. The total number of public lamps in 1937 was 12940 with an increase of 1309 lamps. Of the new lamps, 542 were mercury vapour and 70 sodium vapour and the totals for these types of lamps in 1937 was 1755 and 70 respectively. 451 miles of streets were lighted. The total number of parade lamps in lighting was 375, comprising a total of 45 separate parades of 500W, 300W and 200W lamps. Schemes for the conversion of the span wire lamps on tramway poles to mercury vapour lamps attached to trolley bus standars were being carried out in London Road, Enfield; Village Road, Ridge Avenue; Park Avenue, Edmonton; Edware Road, Edgware. 1937 Journal
South Metropolitan Gas Company, London The Public Lighting Department of the company supplies 575 miles of road with gas lighting including 64 miles of main road lighted with high pressure gas lamps the majority of which are the latest Supervia type; 1183 are mounted as centrally suspended units with raising, lowering and traversing gears and 1219 units are mounted on bracket arms with raising and lowering gears. During 1936 there was an increase of 771 in the number of high pressure lamps and 3150 low pressure lamps were converted to high candle power, most of these conversions being to the Supervia principle. The high pressure gas lamps are lighted and extinguished automatically by an increase or decrease in the gas pressure so that the whole of the main roads are illuminated simultaneously. For the control of low pressure 16002 clocks are used. 17 motor cycle combinations are used to inspect the district lighting up and extinguishing times, the drivers carrying in their side cars ladders and all the necessary materials for such supervision. A 7 year contract has been granted to the company by Lambeth for the lighting of some 93 miles of its streets. 23 miles will be be lit to Class "E" standard by means of Supervia lamps and 70 miles to Class "F" with low pressure Supervia lamps. The Southwark Borough Council has entered into a contract for ten years for high pressure Supervia lighting in Great Charlotte Street and Stamford Street. 1937 Journal
South Surburban Gas Company, London A net increase of 341 in the number of public lamps during the year was reported at the annual general meeting of the company. The consumption of gas for public lighting rose by 11% over 1936. 1938 Journal
United Kingdon Gas Corporation The construction of a Yorkshire gas grid has strted by the erection at Hemsworth of the first of some new gas producing plants. When the grid is complete it will include Castleford, Drighlington, East Ardsley, Elland, Fetherstone, Harrogate, Knottingley, Malton, Sherburn, Normanton, Otley, Pudsey, Rothwell, Yeadon and Guiseley, York, Easingwold, Garforth, Hemsworth and Kippax. The schem is sponsored by the United Kingdon Gas Corporation who control 73 gas undertakings in contiguous groups in various parts of the country. Systems will be linked with miles of high-pressure pipe, the trunk pipelines being 18" in diamenter. The installations necessary to supplement existing gas supplies are to be placed near pitheads in teh area. They will be both gas-producing and purifying plants. No completition date has been given. In the first place, attention will be paid to the needs of industries. This is the first gas grid to receive Parliamentary sanction. The Corporation visualise a further set of grids throughout the country. 1939 Journal
Aberavon, Wales Installation carried out by the Borough Of Port Talbot Electricity Department. 400W MA/V lamps are housed in GEC Tunbridge Wells and Di-fuser lanterns. The mounting height is 25 ft. and the spacing 170 ft. 1936 Journal
Abercarn Abercarn Urban District Council has recevied the necessary loan sanction of the Ministry Of Health for expenditure on the installation on a number of modern gas lamps to improve the lighting on the more important roads in the district. Some of these lamps have 12 mantles, but the majority have 4 mantles. These improvements follow on similar ones already carried out by the Council, a number of the new 4-light lamps having already been introduced. The reflectors used with them were designed in the light of the MOT's recommendations on street lighting. 1939 Journal
Aberdeen Higher power lamps have been fitted up on both electric and gas bus routes. For housing schemes, gas lighting has had preference over electricity, due solely to the initial expense of laying down circuits of cable. A steady increase of ligthing hours is being maintained due to ever-increasing fast traffic on main streets. One 150W sodium lamp has been fitted up at an important junction, but the Watching, Lighting and Fires Committee will not agree to spending money for the adoption of discharge lighting, the reason being the initial expense and that all lighting circuits are DC. All gas schemes in outlying districts are being fitted up with clock controllers, whilst practically every lighting circuit of electric lamps are controlled by time switches. 1937 Journal
Aberdeen The Town Council is to light Great Southern street by 250W mercury discharge lamps. Electric street lighting is also to be installed on the Tullos and Anderson Drive, South housing schemes. 1939 Journal
Aberdeen Although the city is on the east coast, the Council is endeavouring to obtain permission for modified (starlight) lighting to be installed. 1940 Journal
Aberdeen "I recall being in Union Street, the chief shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen and overhearing two women who were standing under the full light of a high power discharge lamp which had been newly erected for exhibition purposes. One woman remarked: "Do I look like you Maggie?" The other replied "Yes." The first one then retorted "Well, then let's get away from here." 1945 Journal
Aberdeen The GEC install the world's first cold cathode street lighting installation along Union Street in 1954. Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Abergavenny The first gas street lighting scheme for trunk road lighting to qualify under the Trunk Roads Act, 1936, has now been approved by the Ministry and will be carried out on 1¼ miles of the Newport-Shrewsbury Road. It lies in the area of the Abergavenny Corporation and the Corporation Gas Department is in charge of the lighting. The new installation, which is a term of ten years, comprises 54 gas lamps, each of which has 10 mantles. They will be mounted on 25' steel columns, with 6' overhang on the roadway, and will be spaced between 120' and 150' (allowing for bends, junctions etc.) Automatic lighting and extinguishing devices are fitted to all lamps. The contribution from the MOT is 50% grant for capital charges and a similar grant for annual maintenance and supervision. 1939 Journal
Abergavenny The Avergavenny Corporation Gas Department has carried out a number of improvements of the town's street lighting. In the main shopping street, the existing lighting is being replaced by a similar installation to that adopted for the Newport-Shrewsbury trunk road, and higher powered lamps are being substituted for the lamps in commission on other roads. During a recent month, twenty-two 2- and 3-light lamps were replaced by 4-light and 7-light suspension lamps. All lamps in the town are now fitted with automatic control for lighting and extinguishing. 1939 Journal
Abergavenny The first gas street lighting scheme in this country for trunk road lighting to qualify for the Ministry Of Transport grant under the Trunk Roads Act, 1936, has now been finally approved by the Ministry and will be carreid out on 1¼ miles of the Newport-Shrewsbury road. This part of the traffic route lies in the area of the Abergavenny Corporation and the Corporation Gas Department is in charge of the lighting. The new installation, which is for a term of 10 years, comprises 54 gas lamps of the latest pattern, each of which has ten mantles. They will be moutned on 25' steel columns, with 6' overhang, and will be spaced at intervals of 120' to 150'. Automatic lighting and extinguishing devices are fitted to all lamps. The Gas Department is also carrying out a number of improvements in the town's street lighting although they are not eligible for a MOT grant. In the main shopping street the existing lighting is being replaced by a similar installation to that adopted for the trunk road and higher powered lamps are being substituted for the lamps in commission on other roads. During a recent month, 22 2- and 3-light lamps were replaced by 4-light and 7-light suspension lamps. All lamps in the town are now fitted with automatic control for lighting and extingushing. 1939 Journal
Aberlady An agreement for 5 years has been entered into by the North Berwick Urban District Council for the street lighting of gas of Aberlady. 1939 Journal
Abertillery More than 600 gas lamps are covered by a renewal of the lighting contract by the Abertillery Urban District Council. 1939 Journal
Aberystwyth, Wales The promenade has been relit by REVO. 36 REVO C6027 units have been installed which are fitted with 160° upper refractors and lenticular glass under refractors, equipped with 300W gas-filled lamps. The units are mounted 22' high on REVO B5972 double arm brackets with 6' spread, which are erected on existing standards, spaced at 150' apart. Includes night photograph. 1937 Journal
Accrington The side streets are being converted to electricity where a portion of the scheme is now in commission in the Ormerod Street district. To improve main-road lighting, the Public Lighting Committee suggest increasing the light output of 219 lamps in Burnley Road, Blackburn Road, Manchester Road and Whalley Road. This will substitute 100W and 200W GLS lamps with 300W lamps and will cost £159 3s, the annual cost of electricity mounting to £117. The fittings displaced by the improvement will be available for the improvement schemes on the side and residential roads of the town. 1938 Journal
Accrington The Council is making further progress with the conversion of street lighting from gas to electricity. More than 1,000 lamps in side streets have been converted. It is expected that the scheme will be completed in the New Year. 1939 Journal
Accrington A start has been made by the installation of 100 approved (starlight) street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
Acton A recent important street lighting contract in the Greater London area is a 15-year agreement made between the borough of Acton and the Gas Light And Coke Company. About 2,034 lamps are covered by the contract which specifies various improvements in illumination. 1939 Journal
Addlestone New lighting installed consists of 48 Bromford Tube steel columns, 30' high, with overspan of 6' and fitted with Sugg London lamps. The lifting gear fitted was by Keith Blackman And Company. The lighting was installed along Church Hall, Station Road, High Street and Brighton Road. 1936 Journal
Addlestone New lighting installed includes sixty-one 8-mantle London gas lamps from Sugg. 1939 Journal
Aireborough Improvements are being carried out in the lighting of Yeadon, Guiseley, Rawdon and Hawksworth, which fall within the area of Aireborough Urban District Council. THe lighting is by gas and the present contract extends until the end if 1946. 1939 Journal
Alloa Gas lighting is being improved by replacing low standards with others of double the height, with lamps of higher candle power, fitted with reflectors and controlled by time-switches. 1937 Journal
Alloa The Pressure Wave System of lighting and extinguishing has now been entirely superseded by clock controllers. The main thoroughfares continue to be improved to Class "E" with Sugg Rochester eight No. 2 mantles, with "K" wing reflectors and Holophane Dish Refractors, mounted at 18' with 45 yard spacing. 1937 Journal
Alva A contract for gas street lighting has been concluded between Alva Town Council and the Alloa Corporation Gas Department. The contract is for ten years. The main thoroughfare of the town will be lighted with 27 Sugg Rochester Lamps with eight No. 2 mantles, wing reflectors and Holophane Dish Refractors at a mounting height of 18' and 45 yards spacing. The installation will displace low standard lamps. 1937 Journal
Amersham The Parish Council decided to adopt an experimental scheme of lighting in Hill Avenue and at Oakfield Corner. Fluorescent 80W mercury discharge lamps will be installed, supported by 125W lamps of the same type at Oakfield Corner. The total cost amounts to £54 12s 5d for equipment and £12 5s 5d for erection. 1939 Journal
Andover The Andover Lighting And Power Company have been successful in obtaining the public lighting contract (by gas) for ten years and the most up-to-date methods of street lighting will be put into operation after the cessation of hostilities. 1940 Journal
Annan Has entered into a three-year contract for gas street lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Armadale Has obtained a ten-year contract for gas lighting which includes the Blackburn, Stoneyburn and East Whitburn districts. The Armadale Gas Company has also obtained an order to light a housing scheme with 27 lamps on concrete columns and a mounting height of 15' to conform to the recommendations of the MOT. 1938 Journal
Ashburton (Devon) Has signed a ten year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Ashford, Kent Ashford is only 10½ miles from the sea shore and comes within the restricted area and would not be allowed to install even reduced lighting. The Electrical Engineer, Mr. H. Wilson states: "At the start of the war we went to some trouble to get all our public lighting under central control, and we were rather hoping that we should be able to use it, and put it out on receipt of an air raid warning. When it became certain that this would not be allowed, we used the centralised system, which was idle, for purposes of air raid alarm." There is a separate street lighting conductor all over the town, and connections from this are carried into most of the houses in the underground service cable which supplies the house. It is possible to use this conductor for ARP warnings. When the current is interrupted by working a push at ARP Headquarters, the relays in wardens' houses all close and ring the bell from a battery near the bell. Any signal sent out from ARP Headquarters is thereby transmitted to these bells in less than two seconds. 1940 Journal
Ashington, Northumberland Currently all electric and lit by 1000 filament lamps. Experiments have started with trial installations of sodium lamps, mercury lamps and combined mercury and filament lamps. 1937 Journal
Ashton-Under-Lyme 93 500W tungsten filament lamps are now in commission. Mounting height 25', overhang 6', spacing 120'. The installation was designed to comply with the MOT Interim Report, and the lighting equipment used can be changed over to electric discharge at any time. 1937 Journal
Ashton-Under-Lyne Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. The Ashton-Under-Lyne Corporation have erected along main roads and bus routes 471 new war-time public electric lighting fittings. These are fitted with 60W lamps in standards with mounting heights of 20' and over, and 40W lamps in 15' standards. 42 similar fittings are being erected for the Limehurst Rural District Council in the Bardsley and Waterloo districts. 1940 Journal
Ashton-Under-Lyne Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Atherston Have renewed their gas street lighting contract. Of the 150 lamps affected, 22 are on a new site. Improvements in lighting are to be made. 1937 Journal
Axbridge Under a new contract, covering a period of five years, gas has displaced electricity in Axbridge, Somerset. 1939 Journal
Ayr An experimental installation of 12 (starlight) lamps is being tried. 1940 Journal
Ballymena Street lighting improvements are in hand in Ballymena, where the Council have renewed their contract for gas. Over 400 lamps are in use. 1939 Journal
Bangor Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. They have 822 lamps. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Bangor Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Banstead Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed.

1937 Advert
Banstead The sub-committee to consider extensions to the recently inaugurated public lighting scheme have made the following recommendations: Additional lighting in the parishes of Banstead, Kingswood and Walton-On-The-Hill on 14.86 miles of road at an annual cost of £2170; additional lighting in the parishes of Chipstead and Woodmansterne on 5.69 miles at an annual cost of £870. 1938 Journal
Banstead A scheme for the extension of strete lighting throughout the Urban area has been approved. Four hundred electric lamps will be required. 1939 Journal
Bapchild (Sittingbourne) The Parish Council have made a three year contract for lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Barking 120 Sieray electric dischrage points, of which 34 carry two lanterns each, will be installed on the By-Pass and River Road. These have been accepted by the town council. 1937 Journal
1937 Journal
Barking The lighting in London Road Extension, Barking, was carried out by Siemens Electric Lamps And Supplies, Ltd. to the instructions of Mr. W. E. Kidner, A.M.I.E.E., Borough Electrical Engineer of Barking and is part of an extensive Sieray street lighting contract of some 250 units. The units consist of 400W Sieray Type "H" Lamps in Bi-Way lanterns mounted on the trolley bus standards at 25' with 6' projection. The control apparatus is housed in cast iron boxes strapped to the standards. Spacing is 120' feet and the installation is Class D of British Standards BS 307:1931. Includes a night picture. Later advertisement states that over 500 units of Sieray Type "H" Lamps in Bi-Way lanterns have been installed in East Ham and Barking. 1937 Journal
1938 Advert
1939 Advert
Barking Approved war-time fittings have been installed in certain roads and the Council is to consider further extensions. 1940 Journal
Barrow-In-Furness One of the main streets has been lit with a number of 12-light lamps. Installed by the Gas Department.

1937 Journal
Barrow-In-Furness In accordance with a recommendation of the Electrical Engineers, the Electricity Committee have decided to erect 14 street lamps on the Links Estate, Walney, the cost of necessary mains and lamp standards being approximately £359. 1939 Journal
Barrow-In-Furness Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Barwell Barwell have changed over to gas for street lighting, a decision made by Hinckley Urban District Council. The 91 new lamps are clock-controlled and are fitted with automatic ignition and reflective devices. Each has four gas mantles and those on the main roads are fitted with No. 2 mantles, those in other roads with "Bijou" mantles. The lighting was designed in accordance with the MOT Report. Includes pictures. 1937 Journal
Bath Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Bath By the end of March, all main road lighting in the City will be carried out by sodium electric discharge lighting. The installation will conform in every respect to the MOT Final Report. 1938 Journal
Bath Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Bath Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Battersea The Highways Committee have reported that mercury discharge lamps in St. James' Road proved satisfactory, and the Committee now proposes to adopt the same system as an improved form of lighting in the Borough generally. 1938 Journal
Battersea Public Lighting in Lombard Road and Vicarage Cresent is to be improved by the provision of 17 mercury vapour lamps erected on tall steel columns at an estimated cost of £867 7s 7d and involving an increased annual cost of £175 18s 6d. 1939 Journal
Battersea The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Battle Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Beccles The Borough Council have decided to accept a tender of £773 per annum from the East Anglian Electric Supply Co. Ltd. for street lighting during 7 years from August 1st. The new agreement, which provides for general improvements and main road lighting, is virtually a considerable reduction on the existing contract which amounts to £829 2s 6d per annum. 1939 Journal
Beckenham Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Bedford The Electrical Engineer's recommendation to the Electricity Committee for improving the lighting in the Queen's Park district have been approved. Proposals for Iddesleigh Road and Hurst Grove are to light the intersections more efficiently and reduce the average spacing between lamps. In Iddesleigh Road, the spacing will be reduced from 192' to 128', and in Hurst Grove the spacing will be reduced to 110'. Lighting on Bromham Road West will be reduced from 178' to 115'with the number of lighting points being doubled. The additional annual cost will amount to £274 16s which includes the provision of lamps of higher wattage. 1938 Journal
Bedford The Council have accepted the recommendation by the Highways Committee to install a system of centralised control for Bedford's all-electric street lighting, comprising some 2,000 street lamps. The estimated cost of carrying out the work is £4,675, loan sanction for which is being sought. In making this decision the Council has kept in mind the possibilities of utilising the control apparatus for other useful purposes in connection with the distribution of electricity. The trunk road lighting thoroughout Bedford is to be improved by the Highways Committee at a cost of £3,811 while other lighting improvements are to be carried out at a cost of £1,356. 1939 Journal
Bedford The Council had adopted the Rythmatic System of Central Control so under the new order, 1960 street lamps have been converted from "Star-lighting" to the new intensity of 0.2 foot candles i.e. "Moon-lighting" 1944 Journal
Bedford The Electrical Engineer of Bedford, Mr. P. G. Campling, in a report to The Highways Committee of the Bedford Corporation, suggests that all future Group B lamp standards should be concrete: the existing cast iron columns are shattered during collisions constituting a grave risk to pedestrians; steel cannot be purchased at the current time; but concrete posts are obtainable. The capital cost is higher than cast iron, but they do not require painting, thus reducing maintenance costs. The Committee recommended the use of concrete posts in the future. 1945 Journal
Bedwellty 250W mercury discharge lamps have now been erected in the district of New Tredegar, Pengan, at a spacing of 150' and 25' mounting height. The capital cost of the work amounted to £200, the annual charge per lamp being £3 8s. 1939 Journal
Bedwellty Rapid progress is being made in providing approved war-time lighting in various parts of the area. 1940 Journal
Bedwellty Some lighting areas in Bedwellty are operated from a "master control" and the lighting has been to the standard of 0.2 foot candles. The public much appreciate the improved lighting and in particular the bus drivers who prefer the new lightign to the pre-war lighting. Thsi is undoubtedly due to the absence of glare. 1944 Journal
Beeston The first installation of sodium discharge lamps on High Road was officially inaugurated on Tuesday, 1st February. 1938 Journal
Belfast Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Belfast Number of gas lamps increased by 501 from 1935 to 1936. Gas supplied for public lightign by the Corporation Gas Department amounted to 423,000,000 cubic feet during the year to 15th May 1936. This was an increase of 43,000,000 on the previous year. 1937 Journal
Belfast An increase of 10,000,000 cubic feet of gas used for Public Lighting reported during the year ended March 31st. The total gas consumed was 401,000,000 cubic feet. Most of Belfast's main roads are lighted by low-pressure cluster-type of gas lamp which have proved very efficient and economical. 1938 Journal
Belfast 372 electric lamps have been erected over a distance of approximately 13,000 yards. 1939 Journal
Belfast Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Belfast War-time street lighting has proved very popular with the public. It is intented to install at least 1000 fittings by next winter. 1940 Journal
Belfast The new war-time "starlight" street lighting has proved popular with the public. 1940 Journal
Belfast Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Bellshill Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads and certain side roads by Lanark County Council. 1940 Journal
Benfleet A 15-year contract has recently been entered into by the Benfleet Urban District Council with the Gas Light And Coke Company for relighting seven miles of main road to class F with 6-mantle upright Rochester lamps fitted with Holophane refractors. All the side street lamps will have a minimum of three mantles and clock control with catalytic ignition is to be fitted to each lamp. 1939 Journal
Berkhamstead Have signed a five year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Berwick The Town Council have decided to include in its estimates the sum of £6,000 for electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Berwick A sum of £6,000 is to be included for electric street lighting in the estimates for 1939-40 by the Berwick Town Council. 1939 Journal
Bethnal Green BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Bethnal Green The borough is almost only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Bexhill Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed.

1937 Advert
Bexhill The Lighting Sub-Committee has recommended the installation of 31 sodium discharge units, similar to those in Terminus Road. It is proposed to use existing trolley bus standards. The total cost is estimated at £1424. 1937 Journal
Billingham-On-Tees The new Nelasis Bridge and approaches are to be lit by electric discharge lamps. Plans and estimates have been approved by the Urban District Council at a cost of £393. The complete electrification of Billingham street lighting, amounting to 27 miles, is virtual complete. On the main road, 240 400W mercury discharge lamps have been installed, mounted at 25', overhang 5', with single refractor lanterns. Residential areas are lit by 496 100W and 200W filament lamps at height 15' to 18'6", directional reflectors being used. Lighting period is dusk until midnight, although about 15% of the lamps burn all night. Synchronously controlled time switches operate throughout the scheme. The scheme is 736 lamps in total. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Billingham-On-Tees 280 420W HPMV electric discharge lamps were instsalled on some 12 miles of main roads, and 16 miles of residential streets were uniformly lighted by 500 100W and 200W metal filament lamps. In residential streets, the original positions of the columns were re-arranged and ESLA Bi-Multi reflectors judiciously selected to provide a maximum uniformity of illumination. Group switching was arranged where possible. Steel columns and brackets were supplied by REVO. Lanterns and equipment for the HPMV lamps were by the GEC and the whole installation was designed by the North-Eastern Electric Supply Co., Ltd., to the approval of Mr. J. H. Hill, Engineering to the Council. 1937 Journal
Bilston, Holyhead Road The installation along Holyhead Road consists of eight-light Stechford Lamps fitted with 12-facet, 8-facet and AH Mor-lite directional reflectors. The lamps are mounted at 20' with an overhang of 4' with spacings of 110'. Includes day and night photograph and an iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Bilston, Oxford Street The installation along Oxford Street consists of six-light Maxill Lamps staggered at 130' spacing and mounted at 20'. Test point illumination of 0.06 foot-candles is provided for an expenditure of 1860 lumens per 100 linear feet. Includes night photograph. 1936 Paper
1943 Paper
Binbrook, Lancs An electric street lighting installation of 16 lamps has been inaugurated. Before WWI, Binbrook had paraffin lamps and later acetylene. Lighting was discontinued during the war and was not renewed afterwards, but when electricity became available it was felt that lighting was called for. 1937 Journal
Bingley On the 15th August a new main road lighting scheme comprising 150 fluorescent electric discharge lamps was inaugurated by Mr. E. R. Pack, Chairman of the Urban District Council. The installation covers a route of three miles, with the columns arranged in staggered formation at a spacing of 120'. The whole of the erection work was carried out by the Electricity Department to the specificaiton of Mr. C. G. Cook. The lighting is controlled by a direct current bias system from a single point at the electricity works. The scheme cost £3,000 and will shorted by extended by the addition of a 37 units covering ¾ mile. 1938 Journal
1939 Journal
Bingley Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Birkenhead Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Birkenhead BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Birkenhead Several of the main roads have been lighted with war-time fittings. 1940 Journal
Birkenhead Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Birmingham In 1886 there were 7000 lamps in the city. 1945 Journal
Birmingham In 1922 there were 22,000 lamps in the city. 1945 Journal
Birmingham The Corporation are given powers to compel the lighting of courts and courtyards. 1938 Journal
Birmingham In 1932 there were 35,000 lamps in the city. 1945 Journal
Birmingham Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Birmingham, Bromford Lane First installation in the world of horiozntally-burning mercury vapour lamps in BTH Mercra "H" lanterns in 1934. 1937 Journal
Birmingham, Corporation Street High pressure gas lighting to Class A of BS 307:1931. Pairs of lamps suspended across the carriageway. 1936 Advert
Birmingham, New Street High pressure gas lighting to Class A of BS 307:1931. Pairs of lamps suspended across the carriageway. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Birmingham GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed along all the main arteries. By 1937, the installation includes 3,700 lanterns including 2,220 GEC Di-fractor lanterns making it the largest electric discharge installation in the world. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
1937 Catalogue
1937 Catalogue
Birmingham, Fox Hollies Road Part of the Outer Circle Bus Route in Birmingham. Illuminated by means of 3-light Warwick Square Lamps with Mor-lite and Curved Top Directional Reflectors to Class G of the B.S. Specification 307. Part of a survey of modern gas street lighting installations for a conference paper. Includes night photograph and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Birmingham There are now 4,600 electric standards running at 800 kW. Owing to the success of the electric discharge system, the installation will be extended to all the arterial roads from the centre of the city and the more imporant secondary traffic routes. The scheme will cover about 192 miles of road at a cost of £76,612. Three types of lamps, 400W, 250W and 150W will be used according to the width and importance of the road. (Incorrectly noted as Exeter in the Journal.) 1937 Journal
1937 Journal (correction)
Birmingham An average of 150 columns are being erected and completed each week on the principle traffic routes. Mercury Discharge lamps are being used wherever alternating current is availale. In other places, filament lamps will be changed over to Mercury Discharge when suitable supply is available. 1937 Journal
Birmingham Have installed the original BTH Mercra H lantern. 1937 Advert
Birmingham Have improved the lighting of 120 miles of main roads by means of discharge lamps or, where A.C. mains did not exist, by high powered filament lamps. 400W HMPV have been used on the main roads and 250W on the secondary roads. After exhaustive tests a specially designed rectangular lantern was adapted for the main roads, and a lantern with a one-piece refractor bowl was used for the secondary roads. The lighting units are fixed at an average distance of 70 yards apart and 25' in height. On tram routes the traction poles have been utilised as far as possible, special brackets being fixed to the poles in order to obtain a uniform light source of 25'. Where A.C. mains not available, the same type of lantern has been used, with 500W or 300W Tungsten filament lamps, so that as and when the mains are changed over to alternating current, the discharge lamps can be fitted. The lighting near the junction of side roads which enter main roads has been improved by increasing the capacity of one or two lamps or by fixing an additional lamp to form a graduation from the main road. The whole scheme has necessitated the fitting up of 3,775 lighting units and the discontinuance of nearly 5,000 lamps, 95% of which were gas. 1937 Journal
Birmingham The Corporation Handbook of 1938 states that the City now has approximately 35,800 street lights of which more than 9,000 are electric. During the past year the department has completed what is claimed to be the largest scheme of lighting ever carried out in the country by improving 120 miles of main roads. Since 1883 the Corporation has possessed powers to compel the lighting of courts, but it was not until a few years ago that it was decided to enforce them. In default of the owners providing and maintaining lamps the City Council have decided to relieve them of all future liability for the maintenance of court lamps, provided the owners paid for the installation; approximatelyu 5,200 court lamps are now maintained by the Corporation. 1938 Journal
Birmingham The use of electricity for street lighting in the city of Birmingham and the Warwickshire area is steadily growing and there are now over 8,500 standards with an equivalent of 1800kw of lighting provided for this purpose. SO successful has the introduction of electric discharge lighting been, than the City Council in July 1936 authorised the installation of this system on all the arterial roads from the centre of the city and also on the more important secondary traffic routes. This important scheme covers about 192 miles of road at an estimated cost of £76,612. Three types of lamps - 400W, 250W and 150W - are used according to the width and importance of the road. 1939 Journal
Birmingham, Priory Road 400W mercury discharge lamps installed. The natural background around a curve was so dark that it the wall behind it was painted white. Mounting height is 25' and spacing 90' around the curve. 1944 Journal
Birmingham Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Bishop Aukland About 724 lamps are affected by a five-year contract for gas lighting entered into by the Bishop Auckland Urban District Council. The contract comes into force on 1st July. 1938 Journal
Bishops Stortford Mrs. Ward, the wife of the Chairman of the Bishops Stortford Urban District Council, officially switched on the new electric lighting on the 24th March 1937. A small dinner was then held for members of the North Metropolitan Electric Power Supply Company, the District Council and Lighting Committee. "May this better lighting increase the prosperity of Bishops Stortford." The change over to electricity followed a very complete investigation of competitive schemes by the Council and several tours of inspection of lighting installations of nearer London districts. The installation comprises 13 250W Osira lamps mounted 25' hight, with 175' spacing, providing a good Class F in the main traffic routes;25 250W Osira lamps mounted at 25' high, spaced 230', giving a good Class G on the town approaches; 8 300W tungsten lamps 25' high, 230' spacing, giving Class G and 397 100W tungsten mounted at 17'6" with spacing between 175' and 220' giving generally Class H in the side streets. Staggered formation is adpoted, except in a few cases where no footway exists on one side of the road. All of these lamps, with a few exceptions, are mounted on concrete columns supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1937 Journal
1944 Journal
Bishops Waltham Improvements are being carried out in the lighting of Bishops Waltham under the 5-year agreement with the local gas undertaking. 1939 Journal
Bishopsbriggs, Glasgow Have schemes controlled by Henley Sharborn Remote Control Relays. 1939 Journal
Bishopsworth A loan of £450 is required for an electric street lighting scheme covering built-up main roads where electric cables are present. It is proposed to erect 17 columns and 16 brackets. 1937 Journal
Blaby Blaby Parish Council has entered into a 7-year contract for gas lighting its area. All 2-light lamps will be replaced by a modern type with higher candlepower. 1939 Journal
Blackburn Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Blackburn The Street Lighting Committee has recommended that the Borough Engineer should collaborate with the Electrical and Gas Engineers on Street Lighting. The following basis is to be adopted for the report: (i) Present lighting cost; (ii) the estimated capital cost of improving the lighting to the appropiate standard by electricity or gas; and (iii) the estimated annual maintenance, renewal and repair costs. 1938 Journal
Blackburn A sum of £2,300 is to be spent by the Blackburn Corporation Gas Department on the lighting of new areas and in improvements to the existing lighting. 1938 Journal
Blackburn The Blackburn Street Lighting Committee have formulated a scheme for lighting the main traffic routes of the town at a cost of £24,000. 1939 Journal
Blackburn Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Blackpool Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. About 200 400W Osira lamps in Watford lanterns have been used to light the main thoroughfares. 1935 Catalogue
Blackpool First installation of 25' concrete columns in Europe in 1936. They are made by Concrete Utilities. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Blackpool Pioneer installation of concrete columns from Concrete Utilities. The town's lighting engineer continues to order columns from the firm. 1938 Catalouge
Blackpool Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Blackpool GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
Blackpool Number of gas lamps increased by 333 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Blackpool During the past five years over 50% of the lighting in the town has been replaced. Old type lanterns have been replaced by modern lanterns, 6-light alignment, 4-light alignment, and all fitted with directional reflectors, governors and fixed nipples and new blow bye-pass tips. Class E: 90% are mounted on 25' steel tubular columns, staggered at 45 yards; F and G: on 12'6" cast iron columns, staggered at 35 yards; H: on 11'6" cast iron columns, staggered at 35 yars. 1937 Journal
Blackpool The new "Princes Way" promenade at Norbreck and "North Parade" promenade at Thornton Cleveleys have Concrete Utilities columns installed.

Part of the promenade has been lighted very effectively by 27 double-arm decorative concrete columns equipped with two 300W lamps at a mounting height of 20'. In addition 10" diameter opal glass spheres each equipped with 100W lamps are provided at 10'6" for all-night lighting. Metal work is finished in stone colour to match the columns. The low maintenance costs of concrete has influenced the choice, while the lanterns are totally enclosed, and are both weatherproof and dustproof. (A picture of this installation, which includes GEC lanterns, was included in the 1939 journal).

These are Concrete Utilities Blackpool New Type columns and brackets, designed especially for the town.

1937 Journal
1938 Journal
1938 Catalogue
1939 Journal
Blackpool One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Blackpool Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Blackpool After an extensive trial the Corporation is considering the provision of war-time street lighting throughout the borough. 1940 Journal
Blackpool Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Blackpool Prior to the outbreak of war, the Country Borough Of Blackpool had 10,200 public street lamps (gas and electricity) for the lighting of 251 miles or classified and unclassified roads. There was complete black-out in September 1939. On March 31st star-lighting was introduced and 7000 units were in operation. Since the dim-out conditions have been in force since September 1944, gas and electricity departments have converted 7100 lighting units to conform to the new conditions and an addition sum of £2500 was recently voted by the Council to add to the number of lamps in areas not covered by lighting after the outbreak of war for security reasons. As the lighting cannot be operated by central control, the maximum light is 0.02 f.c., and to conform to these conditions special electrical fittings have been fixed on the lighting columns, and the gas lanterns have been screened and fitted with single Bijou mantles to diffuse the light away from the base of the column. The public's reaction has been most marked, and a large number of appreciative letters have been sent directly to the Departments concerned and the Press. It is anticipated that some 8000 lamp columns in the Borough will be fitted with the dim-out lighting units before the close of the year 1944. 1944 Journal
Blackridge (West Lothian) Gas has been chosen as the illuminant under a 10-year contract. 1939 Journal
Blantyre Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads and certain side roads by Lanark County Council. 1940 Journal
Blyth Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Bobbing (Sittingbourne) The Parish Council have made a seven year contract for lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Bocking Improvements are contemplated in the lighting of Braintree in which about 314 gas lamps are in commission. The agreement with the local gas undertaking has recently been renewed. 1939 Journal
Bocking Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Bognor Regis GEC Tunbridge Wells lanterns burning 400W MA/V lamps have been installed on concrete columns. 1937 Catalogue
Bolsover Bolsover Urban District Council have entered into a seven-year contract for gas lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Bolton Of the 360 miles of lighted thoroughfares in Bolton gas is responsible for 343 miles. There are 7772 gas lamps in operation. 1936 Journal
Bolton The main Manchester Road has been relit. The new installation is comprised of 78 150W Sodium Vapour Lamps housed in REVO Directional Fittings erected on tramway poles at 25' high and having an overhang of 5' from the kerb edge. The spacing is 42 yards, the road width 38 feet kerb to kerb, and a staggered system has been adopted. With the original lighting a poor Class "H" the new installation provides Class "D." At the end of the last financial year there have been an addition of 133 lighting units: 28 have been gas, 105 electric. Gas lighting is used on new housing schemes. The object of the Lighting Committee is to illuminated all main roads to at least a generous Class "E" with overhead lighting to the Interim Report. Less stringency is being used in the spacing of lamps on secondary roads. After two years' experience of the performance of electric discharge lamps, every confidence is placed in their installation. Both Mercury Vapour and Sodium Vapour have given most gratifying results. The colour complex seems to vanish from people's minds after the first few weeks and continual petitions have been made for the extension of these systems. There is still in service a stretch of 23 Sodium Vapour Lamps - 11 are burning all night and 12 are checked at 11:15PM - that were erected in September 1935, a period of roughly 6,000 burning hours up to the end of March. On this stretch only six lamps have been replaced. 1937 Journal
Bolton Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Bolton On the instructions of the Lighting Committee, the Lighting Superintendent is to erect sodium discharge lamps in Deane Road form its junction with Derby Street, to the existing electric street lighting in Wigan Road. 1938 Journal
Bolton The Corporation Lighting Committee has given the Lighting Superintendent instructions to erect new sodium discharge lighting in Higher Bridge Street and Blackburn Road and Halliwell Road. Approval was given to the Borough Engineer's plans for the provision of a new lighting depot at the corner of Bark Street and Pool Street. 1938 Journal
Bolton There are over 5000 gas lamps working with pressure wave control and for 300,000 actuations the failures each month were 0.06%. The gas undertaking were prepared to supply extra pressure to actuate the control. 1938 Journal
Bolton Moss Bank Way has been lit by 180 REVO C9684B lanterns fitted with 150W sodium lamps. It provides even lighting on the twin roadways. This installation follows the successful installation of sodium lighting equipment in other parts of Bolton 1939 Advert
1939 Advert
Bolton In the centenary souvenir issued by the Bolton Corporation it is stated that as early as 1820, the main thoroughfares of the town were lit by gas and since the incorporation of the municipality has been responsible for the lighting of all public streets. Today, both gas and electricity are used, the latter chiefly on the main roads. As present 11½ miles of main road are lighting by sodium vapour lamps and work is in progress connecting all the main transport routes to this new form of lighting. This main road lighting must be considered not merely as a lighting measure, but as a valuable contribution to road safety. The street Lighting Department controls 8,288 light units in the borough as follows: gas lamps 7,674, electric sodium vapour lamps 478, mercury vapour lamps 19, electric gas filled lamps 117. The gas lamps vary from single mantle lamps to large 16-mantle lamps. The total cost of lighting the borough is £30,000. 1939 Journal
Bolton Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Bolton Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Bolton Bolton Corporation Lighting Department has practically completed the installation of modified "starlight" street lamps. All main roads, with one small exception, are now lighted and when the scheme is finished, Bolton will have 1,300 "starlights" in the borough. Some 500 will be gas-lighted. 1942 Journal
Bolton Mr Morrison, Public Lighting Superintendent, states that since lamps were relighted three months ago, the works of the Department have been handicapped by 365 panes of glass having been broken. 1946 Journal
Bootle The GEC has secured an order for Osira sodium lighting units for Bootle. 1939 Journal
Bootle A scheme recently switched on is an interesting exampel of cut-off lighting correctly laid out and spaced. Spacing is arranged at 110'. The Southport Road is part of a new double-carriageway thoroughfare which will link Liverpool with Southport. The carriageways are separated by a broad central reservation on which are the columns. They are of steel without ornamental castings to reduce corrosion. The lanterns are mounted on long brackets suspending over the middle of the road at a height of 25'. Overhead wirign is used, being carried on the columns. The auxiliaries, transformer, condenser and fuses, are mounted in a sheet steel box near the top of each column. The lanterns are of the open cut-off type and house sodium lamps, the cut-off being between 75°-80° The lamps are controlled by time switches except on the roundabout, where a photo-electric cell performs the switching. The installation was carried out under the supervision of Mr. W. A. Harrison, borough engineer and surveyor. 1939 Journal
Borden (Sittingbourne) The Parish Council have made a seven year contract for lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Borough Green (Kent) The Parish Council has entered into contracts for a term of five years for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Boston (Lincs) Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Boston (Lincs) A new use has been found for the two-hundred-odd street lamp standards. They are being used as direction indicators, and poitn the way to air raid shelters, first aid posts, fire alarms etc. 1939 Journal
Bottesford (Notts) The contract for gas lighting in Bottesford has been renewed by the local Council. 1939 Journal
Bournemouth Gas supply, including public lighting, was commenced in 1868. The supply of electricity started in 1888. 1938 Journal
Bournemouth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Bournemouth Number of gas lamps increased by 996 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Bournemouth In 1933 the Bournemouth Gas Company supplied 7929 public lamps. By 1937 this had risen to 10,222. The street lighting by gas covered 384 miles of road and 10,000 tons of coal was being used per annum to produce the gas. 1938 Journal
Bournemouth Wimborne Road, Christchurch Road and other principle thoroughfares are lit with lanterns combining MA/V lamps and GLS lamps. Over 400 units have been installed. 1937 Advert
Bournemouth The Bournemouth Borough Council, towards the middle of 1935, started trials of various forms of electric discharge lamps. These trial installations also coincided with the 1935 Conference of the Incorporated Municipal Electrical Association. Of the schemes submitted, the scheme by the Bournemouth And Poole Electricity Supply Co., employing Siemens Electric Lamps And Supplies, Ltd. was accepted, the contract comprising the 400 lighting points, incorporating Sieray lamps. The installation includes a lantern housing a Sieray discharge lamp and two gas-filled tungsten filametn lamps, so that the filament lighting blends with the emission from the discharge lamps. The lighting units employed embrace both 400W and 250W Sieray lamps, and in the major part of the installation which calls for directionally controlled lighting, Gower-Sieray lanterns are used. In those positions where symmetrical light distribution is necessary the lanterns are Preston-Sieray type. The units are mounted on ordinary traction standards, the necessary mounting height having been obtained by the lift of the bracket arms. To secure uniformity of each light source in relation to the kerb line, it was necessary to measure the bracket projection at each individual point, and provide a bracket for each siting position. Control is by individual time switches and is so arranged that the lighting intensity is graded throughout the night by employing all or any of the lamps as desired. 1937 Journal
Bournemouth The experimental lighting (see above) has resulted in the installation of 10 miles of electric discharge lighting, and further experimens to lighting roads of less important than main roads, have been carried out. A programme is in hand to provide electric discharge lighting of a lower intensity with the 150W unit, colour modified with tungsten, over a route of 5 miles. A programme where the the by-road lighting, gas, will be improved to approximately Class G over a distance of 11.25 miles has also been decided upon. Nearly the whole of the gas and electric lighting is operated by time controllers, a large portion of these being fitted with solar dials. 1937 Journal
Bournemouth In 1928, the luminous output was approximately 9 million lumens. In 1938, the luminous output was approximately 24 million lumens. A scheme planned for completion in 1948 (and interrupted by the war) was intended to increase the output to 49 million lumens.

The main roads are lit by electricity. The lanterns in the most important parts use a 400W MA lamp with two 150W GLS lamps; in less important parts, the lanterns contain a 250W MA lamp and two 75W GLS lamps. Mounting height is 25', spacing is 114'. On other traffic routes, the lanterns are fitted with one 150W MA lamp with two 40W GLS lamps, in an asymmetric prismatic refractor bowl lantern, mounted at 22', and spaced at 113'-150'. The length in use is 8 miles but this will be extended to 50 miles in the next 8 years. The colour modification by separate GLS lamps gives a very pleasing white light.

"Lower Intensity Lighting" (or bye-road lighting) is carried out by 6000 two- and three-light gas lamps. A scheme is in progress where they will be converted to three-light suspension lamps fitted with asymmetric glass dish refractors and mounted at 14' with a spacing of 100' to 150'. This will ensure the lighting conforms with the "Final Report" as regards Group B lighting.

The Bournemouth Gas And Water Company are pioneering the Aeration Test Burner (ATB) so the whole of the supply will be under ATB control. All gas burners supplied with this gas will give a regular and consistent performance without any need to interfere with the first setting of the air regulator; it may be found that the regulator is unnecessary. Flame size, under ATB control, will be kept within a very small tolerance and will not vary much in its constancy. The improved bye-road gas lighting will be supplied under ATB control with each lamp individually governed and fitted with a nipple with a calibrated orifice.

1938 Paper
Bournemouth "When the Association Of Public Lighting Engineers visited Bournemouth in 1929, the "brightness" and the "illumination" caused the town to take stock, and it became conscious of the fact that things could be improved. This resulted in the improvements in the town." 1938 Paper
Bournemouth A five year plan of captial expenditure for street lighting over the next five years was approved by the Bournemouth Corporation. This covered 1938 - 1943 (and was postponed by the war). 1938 Journal
Bournemouth They utilised gas square lanterns in side streets; by increasing the height by 17", using 3 burners insteaed of 2, and "disc refractors" (which cost 14s per lamp) the lighting efficiency was increased by 50%. 1938 Journal
Bournemouth Have started experiments with starlight street lighting. 1940 Journal
Bradford The Bradford Gas Department states that the quantity of gas used was 251,267,000 cubic feet and the number of lamps in use was 12,944 compared with 12,842 a year earlier; 10,650 lamps have been converted to automatic control. 1937 Journal
Bradford Bradford Corporation is adopting Osira fluorescent lamps for street lighting purposes. Other 100 of these units are shortly to be installed. 1939 Journal
Bradford The street lighting sub-committee have approved a scheme for the lightign of Hollins Hill with sodium discharge lighting at a cost of £700. The new scheme will link up the lighting at Basildon and Cuiseley and the Ilkley Road will be continuously lighting from the city to Escroft. about 40 lamps will be required and they will be erected at 25'. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Bradford Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Bradford In January 1941, the Gas And Electricity Departments shared the lighting of 1000 experimental "starlights" in the centre of the city. The lighting is now being extended on all passengar transport routes within Brdford and the Gas Department has completed the conversion of about 300 of the 400 extra gas lamps required. Bradford Gas Department is also responsible for the lighting of nearly 500 air raid shelters and first aid posts as well as street signs. 1400 gas lamps are now in use: about one-tenth of the pre-war total. 1942 Journal
Bradford Most of the electric street lighting fittings in Bradford have been converted to "Dim Out." The Chief Constable gave early permission to put the scheme of 0.2 f.c. and 0.02 f.c. lighting into operation and on the 12th September 1944, 1392 of the City's 4800 electric street lamps were switched on. Master control of street lighting is available in the centre section of the City and was therefore possible to arrange 25% of the first lamps to have intensities of 0.2 f.c., the remainder being 0.02 f.c. Steady progress has been made and on the 4th November 1944, 3042 lamps were in service. Many of the lighting units had to be completely reconditioned in the workshop after five years disue. Others were attended to on site, while certain types of fittings unsuitable for the restrictions of intensity and direction of illumination had to be replaced by industiral fittings. The lanterns in side streets and back areas had been wilfully damaged in many places and there are some thousand of glass panes to replace as labour becomes available. Overhead cables and services to the lamps and time-switches and control-switches were in use in many of the city areas for "Star Lighting" and were in good repair. The general public has welcomed this improvement and an indication of its usefulness is shown by the decrease in the number of torches being used. The new lighting is particularly helpful to pedestrians. Motorists said they are not satisfied that it makes any difference for night driving. 1944 Journal
Braintree Improvements are contemplated in the lighting of Braintree in which about 314 gas lamps are in commission. The agreement with the local gas undertaking has recently been renewed. 1939 Journal
Braintree Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Brandninch (Devon) Has signed a three year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Breaston New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Breaston Improvements are being carried out where the Parish Council have entered into an agreement for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Brentford And Chiswick Proposals for street lighting improvements include 77 400W mercury discharge lamps on trolley-bus poles (25' high, 120' spacing) and 1000 200W filament lamps. 1937 Journal
Brentford Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Brentford An installation has been erected along bus routes by the Gas Light And Coke Company under a 10 year contract with the Brentford And Chiswick Town Council. The streets vary from wide straight roads and double carriageways to fairly narrow roads with awkward bends and junctions. It was an excellent "testing ground" for the MOT's Committee's Final Report. The units chosen were 12-mantle Maxill lamps by W. Parkinson And Company, mounted at 25' on steel pole supplied by the Bromford Tube Company with Keith Blackman raising and lowering gear. Horstmann Comet igniters are fitted to the lamps and Kingsland clock controllers by the Gas Meter Company are housed with the governors in the bases of the columns. The bends and junctions necessitated very careful siting. The average spacing is 115', the distance between lamps on some of the bends being less than 90', and the average output per 100' is 3750 lumens. It was found on sharp bends that lamps giving adjustment on the reflectors equivalent to about 10° bias were not completely satisfactory; special adjusters were made which enabled the main beam to be emitted at 30° azimuth. 1939 Journal
Brentwood Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. The contract specified gas entirely. Half a mile of the High Street is lighting in accordance with Class D of BSS 307:1931 and four miles of main roads complies with Class F. Lamps on other stretches of main road and on all side roads are increased in candle power and the number of lamps employed is very largely increased. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Bridgend, Wales Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Bridgend, Wales Installation carried out by the Bridgend Urban District Council. 400W MA/V lamps are housed in GEC Di-fuser lanterns. The mounting height is 25 ft. 1936 Journal
Brierfield U.D.C. 25% of the street lighting in the urban district were provided with approved war-time fittings by March 31st. At their April meeting the Council agreed to bring this total up to 50% for next winter, and in September to consider the possibility of lighting every lamp. 1940 Journal
Brighouse During the year ended March 31st, considerable improvements were carried out. The Corporation Gas Department now has the supervision of the whole of the lighting of the newly extended borough, some 1,680 gas lamps being employed. 1938 Journal
Bridlington Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Bridlington ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Bridlington The street lighting in the town is all-electric. The main streets have been recently re-lighted by 127 400W mercury discharge lamps. 1938 Journal
Brightlingsea Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Brighton 300W lamps, arranged in pairs, have been erected in Dyke Road bringing it into line with the lighting on London Road, and resulting in the whole thoroughfare from Seven Dials to the railway station being lighted in accordance with modern practice. 1937 Journal
Brighton War-time "Starlight" street lighting has been installed. There are 550 columns of 10' mounting height, 2,020 columns of 15' mounting height and 1,500 columns at 20'. 1940 Journal
Bristol ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Bristol City Engineer of Bristol stated that 3550 new lamps would be required. If 250W mercury vapour discharge lamps adopted (to maintain the current standard of lighting) then total consumption would be 900,000W as compared to current 360,000W; if 150W sodium lamps were adpoted then the total consumption would be 540,000W. Estimated cost would be £120,000. 1937 Journal
Bristol Plans are now before the Council for providing about 100 miles of classified and certain portions of unclassified road with improved street lighting. The costs amount to £120,000 and embraces the installation of £3500 up-to-date lamps. 1937 Journal
Bristol There are 368 discharge lamps as follows: 70W sodium, 1; 150W sodium, 35; 150W mercury, 55; 250W mercury, 265; 400W mercury, 12. In addition the following old arc lamps were converted to 250W mercury, 8; and 400W mercury, 3. Of the old incandescent gas mantle lamps, 320 were converted to incandescent electric during the year. Mounting height of half-watt incandescents (old arc lamps) and the electric discharge lamps is 25', others 15', and the spacing about 50 yards. Types of lamps are: Gas - mainly 3' burners with two bijou mantles; Electric - mainly two 60W and one 100W bulbs used. 75 gas lamps recently brought into the city are working automatically, but they are gradually being converted to electric. There are also 14 150W mercury lamps extinguished at midnight which work automatically. The 700 half-watt lamps (old arcs) in the main roads in the centre of the city are on a special lighting cable, and are operated by hand from main switches. Experiments are being carried out to provide automatic control for general lighting which is connected to the ordinary electric mains. 1937 Journal
Bristol Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Bristol Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Bristol Capital expenditure amounting to £13,000 has been expended by the Bristol Corporation on street lighting improvement and electrification, including considerable extension in the number of streets lighted with discharge lamps. There are now 7,983 filament lamps and 848 discharge lamps throughout the City. The inclusive cost of the electrified street lighting amounted to £17,936, an average of .875d. per unit. Average charge for gas for street lighting amounts to 6.7d. per therm. 1939 Journal
Bristol Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Bristol A considerable number of 10' and 20' mounting height (starlight) fittings have been installed. 1940 Journal
Bristol When the Deputation which visited London to see the test installation came back with their report to the City Council, they recommended that the whole of the City should be converted to this form of lighting. At first, cost was a concern, but the City Council voted for the whole of the City to be converted. The residential areas were converted first, as the heavily trafficked streets had some light from vehicles, street bollards and other directional lighting. The residents looked at the modified street lighting as a boon cmpared with the blackout. It has also been of considerable assistance to the police. It was original intended to switch the lights off during the summer months, buth the Chief Constable, made appeal this should not be done. As a result, the lights are burning 24 hours a day. 1940 Journal
Bristol A vast number of fittings to BS/ARP 37 have been erected throughout the city. 1940 Journal
Bristol ARP Lighting of the whole city was possible due to an early approval from the Council, so big orders were placed early when quick delivery was still possible. 1940 Journal
Bristol Bristol, after early doubts on the subject, has converted the whole of its street lighting (there are over 6,000 gas lamps) to war-time "starlight" lighting. Residents and police have both expressed their appreciation. 1940 Journal
Bristol Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Bristol Some towns discontinued modified lighting in doubt of safety, in spite of official assurance. Bristol, which has 10,229 lamps lit, later discontinued these; but in September 1941 it was announced that "much-blitzed Bristol" had decided to restore the modified lighting. Similar lighting had been in use in several other cities despite air attack, and its absence in Bristol had not given immunity. 1942 Journal
Bristol The city adopted "Star Lighting" in 1940 and all types of lamps were converted: 25' gas discharge or sodium lamps; arc lamps converted to AC; 12' swan-necks and 10'6" electric and gas lanterns. After receipt of Home Security Circular 97/1944 in July, investigation into the simplest method of obtaining 0.2' fc was commenced. There are no master swtich systems in Bristol which would have allowed adoption of 0.2 fc. The idea was to adapt the starlight fittings with bottoms removed. Nine firms had provided patterns of this fitting - all could be adapted to the horizontal requirement except one. 25' or arc mounting: 25W Pearl lamp gave good results but in certain cases due to a light coloured background, it was necessary to dip it in thinned-down, silver-grey cellulose paint. One some lower Arcs the 15W Plain lamp was used. 12' swan-neck mounting: 15W lamp gave double the intensity so it was necessary to treat with thinned-down, silver-grey cellulose paint. 10'6" electric lanterns: Star Light fittings removed, the lantern glass painted black to horizontal, and treated lamp inserted. 1944 Journal
Bristol Bristol was within the coastal ban and not even ARP/37 could be considered. However in September 1944, the City's Engineer's Department completed and ambitious scheme by installing, through the main thoroughfares of the City, improved and in many cases, entirely new lamp fittings. (Dim-out lighting). The city has a normal installation of 15,000 street lamps extending well over 500 miles of streets and highways. In one workshop, 34' steel fluted columns were fabricated for a 25' mounting height. They carry a 6' arm for the lamp, strengthed by a steel trap above. The works had a stock of 100 of these columns before the war so were able to carry out much of the reinstatement work. 20 columns have now been placed in the city, each at 25' high, giving the required 0.02 foot candle intensity. this is part of the finished scheme for the City Centre and brighter lamps will be installed later.

Square type gas lanterns have now been fitted with electric lamps and to obtain 0.02 f.c. the upper halves of the four glass panels were painted black whilst the lower halves were "haved" with transparent varnish paint thinned down. For Group A roads where 250W mercury discharge lamps were fitted, they have now been replaced with Starlight fittings with the bottoms removed and 25W lamps inserted.

The old arc lamp pillars were made of cast-iron and broke very easily when hit. It was agreed that the slender modern steel tube, bereft of any unnecessary trimmings, gave a smarter appearance. When hit, steel columns would be bent, and it was easy to bend them straight.

In the war damaged areas, most of the lamps were suspended arcs. Under "Moonlight" conditions, 25' mounting pillars had been erected, and more of the main thoroughfares through this damaged, district gave a more cheerful aspect after dark.

1945 Journal
Bristol An installation of a system of automatic control of electric street lighting is being considered. 1945 Journal
Bristol In 1965, the GEC install the first High Mast lighting in the UK, in The Cumberland Basin, Bristol, using 25 metre masts and 1000W MBF/U lamps. [Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974]
Broadstairs and St. Peters Over 520 gas lamps are covered by the 5-year contract in force between the Broadstairs and St. Peters U.D.C. and the local gas undertaking. Various improvements are being carried out. 1937 Journal
Broadway In 1937 the Broadway Parish Council installed gas lighting in place of the electrical street lighting system. The new contract was for a period of three years, expiring in 1940. The term of the contract has been doubled and it will now run until October 1943. 1939 Journal
Bromley A proposal to use Sodium Discharge lamps for improved lighting on Widmore Road is being considered by the Town Council. A widening scheme is in progress at the moment. 1937 Journal
Bromley The South Suburban Gas Company have installed new gas lighting on the newly widened road from Bromley to Hayes. 1937 Journal
Bromley The Lighting Committee has recommended the installation of sodium electric discharge lamps in Burnt Ash Lane from College Road to the Borough boundary. 150W lamps will be erected at 150' spacing with 26' mounting height. The estimated additional cost of providing the lighting is a capital expenditure of £1,100 and £205 19s. 3d. annually. The Committee also recommended improved street lighting in Hayes Lane, between Bromley Common and the boundary of the Corporations area of supply. 200W incandescent lamps at 150' spacing and 26' mounting height would be provided. The capital cost of the scheme is estimated at £340 with an annual cost of £55 9s. 6d. 1938 Journal
Bromley Have installed Philips Philora lamps i.e. low-pressure sodium. 1938 Journal
Bromsgrove About 410 lamps are affected by the renewal of its public lighting contract by the Bromsgrove Urban District Council with the local gas undertaking. The lamps are to be increased. 1937 Journal
Bromsgrove About 500 lamps are covered by a renewal of the Bromsgrove Urban District Council's agreement with the local gas undertaking for the lighting of the town. There has been an increase in the number of lamps of sixty during the year and further improvements in the standard of lighting are to be put in hand. 1939 Journal
Buckfastleigh Buckfastleigh Urban District Council have chosen gas as the medium of public lighting in Buckfast and Buckfastleigh for the next 7 years. 1939 Journal
Buckhaven Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Buckley Buckley Urban District Council have renewed their contract for gas street lighting. 1939 Journal
Budleigh-Salterton Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Burgess Hill The Urban District Counil have entered into a three-year contract with the local gas undertaking for Public Lighting. 1938 Journal
Burgess Hill The Works and Town Planning Committee hae recommended in connection with the Valebridge Road reconstruction scheme that existing gas lamps be removed and replaced by electric lighting standards. 1939 Journal
Burnham-On-Crouch Have entered into a 3-year contract for gas street lighting. 1938 Journal
Burnley Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Burnley ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Burnley During the year gas lighting has been extended to 82 new positions in the borough including 38 lamps fixed on the Hargher Clough Housing Estate. THe number of lamps in use is 4,132. 1937 Journal
Burnley Eleven fluorescent type mercury lamps have been installed for test purposes. 1938 Journal
Burnley The Council have approved proposals for improving the lighting of bus routes lying of main roads and have also decided to light part of the Todmorden Road from the Wellington Hotel to the bus terminius at Townley by sodium discharge lamsp at a cost of £418 9s. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Burnley Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Burnley Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Burnley Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Burnley About twenty miles of streets in Burnley are now illuminated with gas "starlighting". 1942 Journal
Burton-Upon-Trent Had centralised gas control for many years (presumably pressure wave) which was still working. It worked at 99% efficiency (which was unbelieved by many people and had been checked by experts). 1938 Journal
Bury Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
Bury Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Busby Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads and certain side roads by Lanark County Council. 1940 Journal
Caernarvon The Town Council is to consider the introduction of war-time street lighting. 1940 Journal
Calstock, Cornwall The Parish Council has accepted the East Cornwall Electricity Company's tender for £48 for street lighting at Calstock. The tender includes the provision of two additional lights. 1938 Journal
Camberwell The GEC have lit the entire Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell (145 miles of streets) with 4500 GEC lanterns equipped with Osram and Osira lamps including 1000 400W and 250W Osira lamps for the main thoroughfairs. The Country Of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd. entrusted the GEC with the Scientific Planning and the supply of equipment. By 1937, 957 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Camberwell There are 404 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 17 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Camberwell 95% of the Borough's modernisation and electricification is now complete; the remainder will be carried out during the next two years. The most recent modernisation scheme in Camberwell covers the Old Kent Road, where 400W mercury discharge lamps are erected at a mounting height of 25' with a spacing of 150'. 1938 Journal
Camberbell The borough has plans to have only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Cambridge 1001 units of WASK Up And Down Suspension Gear have been installed on gas lighting columns. 1933 Advert
Cambridge Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Cambridge The installation along Gonville Place is to Class E of the B.S. Specification 307. The lighting consists of 6-light, No. 2 Rochester Lamps fitted with single 12-facet side reflector and Holophane Dish refractor. This combination is particularly suitable for dull road surfaces where an overhang is used. The mounting height is 18' and the staggered spacing is 115'. Includes day and night photograph and an iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Cambridge Under a 10 year contract with Cambridge University and the Town Gas Light Company, the work of modernising the 22 miles of main traffic routes in the city by high power gas lamps is approaching completion. It was only after a spirited debate in the town council that it was decided, by 22 votes to 19, to enter into a contract with the Gas Company over a period of ten years. Competitive tenders had been obtained, but the decision of the Council was obviously influenced by a factor other than cost. The Special Lighting Committee reported that they had carefully considered both offers and bearing in mind the greater reliability of gas ligthng, considered it preferable that the town should continue to be lighted by gas. 1937 Journal
Cambridge On the day after permission was given for modified ("Dim Out") street lighting (September 25th), the Cambridge University and Town Gas Light Company was able to put on a large number of the 3145 gas lamps. All the main streets and a number of the side streets were well lighted. Many people came out to applaud the change-over. 1944 Journal
1945 Advert
Cambuslang Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads and certain side roads by Lanark County Council. 1940 Journal
Canterbury In addition to recommending the provision of several additional electric lamps in the city, the Electricity Committee has instructed the Electrical Engineer to report on the cost of replacing all 60W lamps with 100W lamps. 1937 Journal
Canterbury In addition to recommending the provision of several additional lamps to the vincinity of the city, the Electricity Committee has instructed the Electrical Engineer to report at the next meeting on the cost of replacing all 60W lamps in the city by 100W lamps. The Council is also recommended to purchase a new Tower Wagon at £50. 1938 Journal
Canterbury Have installed Philips Philora lamps i.e. low-pressure sodium. 1938 Journal
Cardenden (Fifeshire) Has renewed its contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Cardiff Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Cardiff The Rural District Council has installed an experimental stretch of six starlite war-time fittings. 1940 Journal
Carlisle Further changes from gas to electric street lightign are in hand on Class A roads radiating from the City. Work is now in hand on the A6 and A595 while a similar scheme for the A7 is contemplated in the near future. The high efficiency of discharge lighting is largely responsible for this headway - 250W mercury lamps being used except in the City centre where they give place to 500W filament lamps, 25' mounting height with overhang up to 6' and a spacing of 130', staggered. All complies with the MOT Recommendation. 1939 Journal
Carlisle Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Castleford A seven-year contract for gas lighting has been entered into by Castleford U.D.C. About 633 lamps are covered and improvements are to be carried out. 1937 Journal
Castleford Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Chard Chard Town Council have renewed their agreement for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Charmouth (Devon) Has signed a five year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Charteris Has entered into a three-year contract for gas street lighting. The Council has determined to substitute lamps of a higher candle power for a number of existing units, while all lamps have been fitted with directional reflecting equipment. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Chatham The council have accepted tenders for the provision of 74 mercury discharge lanterns of the refractor bowl type. 1937 Journal
Chatham By the renewal of the contract for a further 7 years, Chatham streets are again to be lighted by gas. Over 800 lamps are affected. 1938 Journal
Chatteris Automatic lighting devices and reflectors have been added to the 113 gas lamps used to light the town of Chatteris. The agreement between the Council and the local gas undertaking has been renewed. 1939 Journal
Chelmsford In 1887 for Queen Victoria's Jubilee, an installation of arc lamps were provided by Messrs. Crompton And Company who were the original suppliers of electrical energy in the town. These were the first electric lamps in the town. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford In 1892 a system of street lighting was introduced consisting of arc lamps erected on wooden poles and supplied by 1100 VDC. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford The first Electric Lighting Order was granted to Messrs. Cromptom And Company in 1894. The existing street lighting was retained. The order was transferred to the Chelmsford Electric Lighting Company the following year. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford In 1905 the original arc lamps were replaced by flame type arc lamps, whilst the side streets were lighted by by 32 candle-power carbon lamps suppled at 110 VAC. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford All electric street lighting was transfered to the Chelmsford Electric Supply Company Ltd in 1907. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford In 1919, all the existing arc lamps were replaced by metal filament lamps.

1937 Journal
Chelmsford In 1934, the electricity supply undertaking was transferred to the County Of London Electric Supply Co., Ltd. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford The whole town is lit by electric lighting by 1937. 1937 Advert
Chelmsford According to a London daily, residents in Chelmsford have discovered that the trees and plants in the gardens of private houses where mercury vapour system of street lighting has been installed are growing more vigorously under their influence. This is said to be due to the ultra-violet rays. It has also been noted that trees in the vicinity of these lamps keep their leaves longer in the autumn. 1937 Journal
Chelmsford The County Of London Electric Supply Company Limited has completed the relighting of the whole of Chelmsford. This covers 40 miles of main, secondary and side roads. 824 units have been installed. BTH Dilen lanterns with 400W and 250W Mercra lamps for lighting main roads and the centre of the town whilst BTH County Junior lanterns with 150W Mazda gasfilled lamps are used for the side roads. In the main the new lanterns have been fitted to the existing gas standards.

187 Mercra 400W and 250W in BTH Dilen lanterns with BTH control gear were installed along the High Street, Moulsham Street, London Road, Duke Street, Tindal Square, Springfield Road, Baddow Road, Rainsford Road, Broomfield Road, New Street, Rectory Road and at principal road junctions. The poles are arranged in a staggered formation, ranging from 120' to 150' while the lanterns are mounted at a height to conform with modern standards. The centre of the town is lit to Class "D" while Duke Street and parts of London Road are Class "E" and the remainder in Class "F."

637 BTH County Junior lanterns with 150W Mazda gasfilled lamps are used for the lighting of the side streets, the majority being fitted at existing positions. For the remainder, additional columns have been provided in some of the more important residential areas to increase the standard of lighting. 19 of these lanterns are fixed to special brackets fitted to company service poles carrying overhead transmission lines and 8 are used in conjunction with wall brackets.

The lamps are controlled by Solar Dial Time Switches and are in commission daily throughout the day - those in important positions and road junctions being lighted from dusk until dawn and the remainder from dusk until 1AM. The County Council is repsonsible for the general maintenance. This new installation affords increases in illumination of 100% in the main thoroughfares, 50% in the principle side streets and 33% in the remainder while generous lighting is afforded at the more important road junctions.

1937 Advert
Chelmsford Twenty standards with 250W mercury discharge lamps are to be installed in Broomfield Road from King's Road to the borough boundary. 1939 Journal
Cheltenham Up until about 1910, there were nearly 400 Brush-Vienna arc lamps in use for street lighting. The arcs were contained in oval-shaped opalescent globes about 16in. long. These lamps were eventually replaced by tungsten fittings. No-one wanted the globes so they remained in the stores until the Second World War. 1941 Journal
Cheltenham Hosts the 1936 APLE Conference where some streets are lit by trial installations. Some of the installations are adopted and retained by the local council after the conference. 1936 Conference
Cheltenham Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Cheltenham The Electricity Committee proposes to improve public lighting of Cheltenham at a cost of £690. 1939 Journal
Cheltenham Considerable progress has been made with the war-time street lighting scheme. 874 out of 1086 fittings ordered have been received. 714 lamps are alraedy in use, principally in the main throughfare. 1940 Journal
Cheltenham The old Brush-Vienna arc lamps globes were given to the Corporation gardens superintendent and were used for propagating plants. They were very satisfactory for this purpose. 1941 Journal
Cheshunt GEC Di-Fractor lanterns have been installed on ornamental Concrete Utilities columns and brackets through Waltham Cross and Cheshunt. 1939 Advert
Chelsea, London Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. All side streets and 13 main traffic routes to be changed: the addition of special reflective devices and the raising of the candle power of existing lamps will double the illumination of side roads; whilst main roads will be brought up to the standard of the Interim Report 1935. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Cheslea, London The Gas Light And Coke Company report that nine miles of principle streets are now lighted by 12-light lamps, either on bracket arm columns or centrally suspended, the illumination being Class E. A lesser distance of secondary street is lighted to a generous Class F while in all side streets the lighting is improved by 100%. All lamps in the borough use clock controllers with solar compensating dials and ignition by means of hot catalyst. 1937 Journal
Cheslea, London The coat-of-arms of four London authorities will be incorporated on the lamp standards of the new Chelsea Bridge. The proposal is: On each of the four outer faces the L.C.C. coat-of-arms; on the faces approaching the Battersea side of the river, the Battersea arms; on the face approaching Westminster, the Westminster arms; on each face approaching Chelsea, the Chelsea arms. Each of the standards will be surmounted by a ship emblematic of the Port of London Authority. 1938 Journal
Chelsea Embankment, London The Victoria and Chelsea riverside embankments were built by Sir Joseph William Bazalgette and opened in 1874. To commemorate the opening of the Chelsea Embankment, two lamps were erected known as the "Climbing Boys." The boys are passing a flaming torch up the column to light it. One is by the old Chelsea Church and the other at the corner of the foot of Albert Bridge. The castings were amde at Coalbrookdale Foundry in Shropshire. 1941 Journal
Chelsea Embankment, London Was lit by Gablakoff arc lamps which occasionally failed. The Gablakoff carbons were vertically parallel and were parted by a compound across which the arc flashed. 1938 Journal
Chelsea Embankment, London This installation conform to to Class E of the B.S. Specification 307. The lighting consists of twelve-light No. 2 B/2 London Lamps. The presence of trees compelled the use of a centrally suspended scheme. Spacing between lamps varies between 150-160' and the mounting height is 20'6". Includes day and night photographs and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Chester The Sealand Road of length 1700 yards has been widened to a width of 50' and includes two footpaths 5' wide and two cycle tracks 5'6" wide. Previously this road has been lighted with small standards 11' high burning 100W lamps. 37 standards have now been erected spaced at 45 yards in staggered formation, the lamps being placed in the footpath hving an arm projecting 9', the light source being 25'; 300W gas filled lamps are used in Holophane refractor fittings. This road conforms to B.E.S.A. Standard Class E. On the 31st March 1936, the parish of Blacon and parts of Gt. Boughton, Hoole and Newton were added to the city boundary. 98 gas standards situated in these areas are to be converted to electricity. In all cases an improved standard of lighting and increased mounted heights are to be used. 1937 Journal
Chester Compared with ten years ago, 2½ times as much electricity is used annually for street lighting in the city, where the lighting is now all electric. A recent extension using mercury discharge lamps of thecolour-corrected type has been completed in Christletin Road. The lamps are at a mounting height of 25' and an average spacing of 135'. Twenty-eight 300W filament lanterns have also been erected on Parkgate Road widening scheme at a mounting height of 25' and an average spacing of 135'. The total cost of these schemes is £901. Both schemes comply with the MOT Final Report recommendations. In addition, the roadway adjacent to the city walls has been lighted, 47 standards being used in place of 22 older type lighting units. A mouting height of 15' is employed, the average spacing being 120'. In this case, the installation, with complies with the MOT recommendations for Group B, utilises 80W mercury discharge lamps, and cost £832. The total number of street lights in Chester, all of them electric, is now 1750. 1939 Journal
Chester A scheme submitted by the City Electrical Engineer, Mr S. E. Britton, for war-time street lighting in a number of streets, has been approved by the Watch Committee. 1940 Journal
Chester By installing a modern method of central control, has enabled Chester to provide its citizens with a much improved standard of lighting. Prior to the recent Order relaxing conditions regarding Public Lighting, 230 Starlight Fittings were used along seven miles. Under the provisions of the new Regulation, 250 lamps have been equipped with 0.2 f.c. and 200 lamps have been equipped with 0.02 f.c. lamps. The Starlight Fittings have been altered to give 0.2 f.c. and new fittings obtained for 0.02 f.c. The 0.2 f.c. lamps use the rythmatic system operated from the main substation in Chester. During the war some 40 lamp standards were knocked down by traffic and a considerable amount of dilapidation has taken place. The restoration has been carried out by the staff and other employees of the Electricity Department. 1944 Journal
Chester-le-Street Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Chesterfield The number of gas lamps in use in Cheterfield is 1,656, an increase of 311 during the last three years. 1938 Journal
Chesterfield At the cost of £6,232 the Chesterfield Council proposes to improve the lighting of the Derby-Sheffield Road. 150W sodium discharge lamps will probably be used. 1938 Journal
Chesterfield Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Chesterfield Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Chesterfield Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Chesterfield A certain number of gas lanterns have been converted to the "Moolight" standard. 1945 Journal
Chicester ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Chicester, Noth Street Sieray (Siemens) lighting. 1936 Advert
Chigwell The Chigwell Urban District Council entered into a 10-year agreement in 1934 for gas lighting in their area. In view, however, of the improvements in the lighting considered necessary last year, a new contract for 15 years has been agreed on. Among the improvements carried out are the substitution of lamps of a greater candle power for some 560 lamps and the installation of a number of new lamps; as a result there has been an increase of 50% in the light output. 1939 Journal
Chigwell Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Chigwell It was revealed at Chigwell Urban District Council meeting at the Council Offices on November 19th, 1941, that in order to give peace of mind to certain nervous ratepayers in the area, Councillers Rev. E. Sutton-Pryce, B.D. and R. F. J. Smith had flown over the Chigwell area at a height of 1500 ft. to ascertain whether the low-intenstiy street lighting would be visible to enemy raiders. They reported that nothing whatever could be seen of the lighting at that low altitude. The Council adopted the resolution stating that they wished the public to realise that there is absolutely no danger from air attack due to low-intensity street lighting. 1941 Journal
Chingford This new Borough (since 1938) has recently completed an extensive scheme of street lighting improvements covering the main roads in the Borough. It was decided along with the Northmet Power Company, that sodium discharge lamps would give the best results both as to extremely good visibility and economical running costs. The scheme was planned by Northmet Power Company to comply with the MOT's Final Report for Group A traffic routes. The scheme provided for 127 140W Philora sodium lamps and had been completed until teh "black out." The equipment comprises fluted steel columns and Golden Ray fittings and a novel feature is that the brackets terminate in an adjustable head so the fitting can be lined up parallel to the road surface. This arrangement confers a distinct advantage where the roads have an appreciable camber and/or gradient. The Golden Ray fittigns are made by ELECO and incorporate a special design of refractor plate, combining horizontal and vertical prisms, thus ensuring a non-axial distribution. 1939 Journal
Chipping Campden Chipping Campden is to chagne for electricity to gas for street lighting. 1939 Journal
Chipping Ongar New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Chipping Ongar Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Chislehurst And Sidcup U.D.C. They have decided to adopt war-time street ligthing over a considerable area. The installation will consist of 155 gas conversion units for London lamps in all first-class traffic routes, 278 such units for Rochester lamps in second-class traffic routes, and 288 for Windsor square lamps in certain residential roads. 1940 Journal
Cirencester Cirencester U.D.C. has renewed its contract for the public lighting of gas of Cirencester and Stratton. 1938 Journal
Cirencester Improvements have been recently carried out in the lighting of Cirencester and Stratton, the lighting being by gas. In certain streets the number of mantles per lamp has been increased and reflectors have been fitted to an increasing number of units. 1939 Journal
Cirencester The Circencester Urban District Council have entered into a 10-year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
City Of London First historical reference to public lighting in the UK is made in 1405 when Aldermen of the City of London were ordered to see that a lighted lantern was hung outside every house along the highway, generally from dusk to nine o'clock "when the moon was dark." Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London In 1461, the first street lighting specification was created when the Mayor and Alderman issued a "Standard Specification" for candles to be used in the lanterns, which stated that they were to be of at least twelve to the pound in weight (in 1599 it was altered to eight to the pound). Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London 1657 was the first occasion on which a municipality assumed responsibility for any part of public lighting when City Aldermen were ordered to supply lights where the responsibility for them could not be placed on private householders. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London The first experiment with gas as an illuminant for public lighting took place along Golden Lane in 1807. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London December, 1878. The first use of electricity in the UK for public lighting when a number of arc lamps were installed along Holborn Viaduct and the Victoria Embankment, after a Committee had examined those used for some time in Paris. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London April 1881. First high mast installation when six 80 ft. masts, each having one arc lamp in a cleaer globe, were erected in front of the Band of England. Masts were constructed of light iron trellis work. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London First to light streets with the Edison incandescent lamp when Holborn Viaduct and neighbouring streets were lit in 1882. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London Captain A. J. Liberty joins the City of London Corporation in 1880. The whole of the City was lighted by flat flame gas burners and he remembered a representative of Auer von Welsbach coming to ask permission to fix up a burner in the Guildhall - actually it ended up in his office. Later, the first thoroughfare in the City, Cheapside, was lighted by Welsbach mantles with a fair amount of success. But the mantles were so fragile that one mantle per day was consumed owing to vibration. Gas lighting went on for some time and then electric lighting made an appearance although there had been a few experimental Jablochkoff lamps on the Victoria Embankment. The advent of the Welsbach upright mantle marked a great improvement on the old flat flame burners but the introduction of the inverted mantle was an equally great, or greater, improvement. Indeed, he felt that it saved the situation as regards street lighting as far as gas was concerned. In the meantime experiments went on with electricity and 104 open type arc lamps were erected in the City Of London displacing 126 flat flame burners. These gradually gave was to the Oriflamme electric arc lamp which was centrally suspended. Then came the Kern burner, using high pressure gas, which was a great improvement on the low pressure inverted mantle for main road lighting. The greatest development in street lighting by electricity had been the introduction of the discharge lamp. 1945 Journal
City Of London In 1900, the authority is the first to introduce powers authorising street lighting apparatus to be fixed to buildings and saving valuable space on footpaths and improving aesthetic amenities. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
City Of London The Court of Common Council has decided to adopt war-time street lighting at a cost of £3,695 for fittings and an annual expenditure of £8,427. Several main roads in the city were lit by magazine arc lamps up to the outbreak of the war. 1940 Journal
City Of London Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
City Of London In 1966 on November 15th, the City of London was the first local authority to introduce the high pressure sodium lamp (SON) for a major street lighting programme. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Clacton-On-Sea Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
1938 Catalogue
Clare (Suffolk) New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Clevedon A recent contract under which gas replaced electricity for street lighting affects Clevedon. Here about 300 gas lamps containing four to six mantles are replacing an equivalent number of electric lamps. 1936 Journal
Clifton A three-year arrangement for gas lighting has been entered into by the Clifton Parish Council. 1939 Journal
Clitheroe Whalley Road lighting has been improved by an installation of 250W mercury discharge lamps in bowl refractor lanterns, mounted at a height of 25' with a small overhang and spaced at 120' staggered formation, thus conforming with the recommendations of the Final Report. 25 columns are installed altogether, including a 400W fluorescent lamp at an important junction. 1938 Journal
Clydebank Three new schemes are in course of erection using Osira mercury lamps, the most important being the conversion of 1¼ miles of main thoroughfare from 300W-500W filament lamps to 250W-400W mercury discharge lamps. In another part of the burgh, 27 gas lamps are being replaced, partly by 125W and 250W mercury discharge lamps. Also on a main boulevard road, three important crossings are being lit by means of 400W mercury discharge lamps. The main thoroughfaires are mounted at from 25' to 26' feet, and carried on both tramway standards and special steel standards. Side streets are mounted at from 22' to 22'6". Spacing is generally 50 yards. All lamps on main thoroughfares are lit and extinguished by time switches. Small lamps in housing schemes are switched on in groups by hand. Gas lamps are lit and extingushed by hand. 1937 Journal
Clydebank Have schemes controlled by Henley Sharborn Remote Control Relays. 1939 Journal
Coalville Improvements in the lighting of Coalville and adjacent villages under its control are being carried out by Coalville U.D.C. Lighting is by gas, about 500 lamps being in present use. 1938 Journal
Coalville Concrete columns (Stanton) with electric lanterns have been installed in Memorial Square. 1940 Journal
Coatbridge Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Coatbridge Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Cockley And Walverley, Kidderminster The Parish Council have undertaken to use gas lighting for the next five years. 1937 Journal
Colchester Improvements to the lighting of the borough are planned by the Lighting Committee and a centralised form of control is being considered. Greenstead Road has been relit with 150W sodium lamps mounted at 25'. 1937 Journal
Colchester The Lighting Committee has recommended that the lighting of Crouch Street, Lexden, Military, Mile End, and Bergholt Roads should be improved at a cost of £4,132. 1938 Journal
Colchester The Borough Engineer reported to the Colchester Town Council that the estimated cost of lighting the trunk road from the Borough boundary at Lexden to the Borough boundary on the Ipswich Road, to conform to the suggestion by the Ministry and for which they would make a grant of 50%, would be £9,262 (maintenance £983 per annum), that the estimated cost of providing lighting in the portion Cook's Lane to the Bathing Place was £3,299 (maintenance £239 per annum). The Borough Engineer was instructed to communicate with the Ministry asking that, on teh grounds of economy, the question of omitted portion of the route, Cook's Lane to Bathing Place, might be considered. 1939 Journal
Coleford A ten year agreement has been entered into by the Coleford (Glos.) Parish Council for the lighting of the area by gas. 1939 Journal
Coleraine Improvements are being made to the lighting of Coleraine under a new contract between the Borough Council and the Gas Department. At present 308 lamps are used to light the town, of which some 83 have three or more mantles. 1938 Journal
Collingham (Notts) Collingham Parish Council are carrying out improvements in street lighting under a new 5-year contract between the Council and the Borough of Newark Gas Department. 1939 Journal
Colne All gas lamps are now fitted with automatic controllers, some 700 additional controllers having been fitted during this period. Gas also replaced the existing electricity installation in the main shopping streets of the town, 23 modern gas lamps being installed in place of 21 electric lamps, and several gas lamps of small candle power. The new lamps, each of which have 15 No. 2 mantles and a stainless steel reflector, have a mounting height of 25' from the roadway, and are spaced at 100'. The installation has brought the lighting up to a standard that conforms with the MOT Recommendations. The expenditure amounts to £5000, the repayment of which is spread over 10 years. 1939 Journal
Colne Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Colne The Colne Corporation Gas Committee has aprpoved the lighting of the whole of the Borough with the BS/ARP 37 approved unit. Public appreciation of the new lighting on main roads during last winter was unanimous. The number of lmaps involved is 900. Street lighting in the Borough is 100% gas. 1940 Journal
Colwyn Bay Seven hundred yards of the West Shore Promenade are to have the lighting improved by the provision of 15 electric street lighting columns on the seaward side. 1938 Journal
Combe Martin Have signed a five year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Consett About 455 lamps are covered by a 10-year agreement for gas lighting entered into by the Consett Urban District Council. Mounting heights of a large number of lamps are to be increased and, where necessary, the candle power of lamps will be raised. 1939 Journal
Corbridge Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Corby An improved lightign scheme involving the provision of 31 250W mercury discharge lamps from the Jamb to Studfall Avenue has been accepted. The Electricity Department quotation for the scheme amounts to £751. Similar lighting has been installed in other parts of the town and quotations are being obtained from the electricity and gas undertakings. 1939 Journal
Coulsdon Brighton and Eastbourne Roads are illuminated by Madza Mercra lamps in BTH Diron lanterns. 1936 Advert
Coulsdon and Purley UDC Approved a scheme for (starlight) lighting for main crossings. 1940 Journal
Coventry Number of gas lamps increased by 324 from 1935 to 1936. The discontinuance of the trams in part of Coventry has given the Corporation Gas Department an opportunity to introduce modern suspension lamps attached to swing arms onto the tramway standards. The new lamps have six mantles each and are fitted with special reflectors and clockwork control. There are 41 units spaced at 40 yards. 1937 Journal
Coventry The City Of Coventry Gas Department has introduced improved lighting in two busy throughfares in the Foleshill district. These are Stoney Stanton Road and Lockhurst Lane. The former is lighted by 97 eight-light modern gas lamps and the latter by 62 eight-light lamps of another type. 1939 Journal
Coventry Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Coventry Modified lighting in the centre of the city has been recommended by the Watch Committee. The cost of carrying out a comprehensive scheme is estimated at £6,000. 1940 Journal
Coxhoe BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Craig The South West Electric Power Company have installed 49 war-time street light lanterns. They are fitted to existing columns. 1940 Journal
Crewe Gresty Road and South Street are included in a £600 scheme of electric street lighting improvements. 1937 Journal
Crewkerne Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Crofton A ten-year agreement for gas lighting has been made by the Crofton (Yorks) Urban Distrit Council. All lamps are fitted with automatic control. 1939 Journal
Crook and Willingdon 309 (starlight) fittings have been installed. 1940 Journal
Crowbridge The South West Electric Power Company have installed 12 war-time street light lanterns. They are fitted to existing columns. 1940 Journal
Crowthorne Has entered into a 7-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Croydon Around 1900, a system was started with pilot wires and remote control switches which has since operated satisfactorly. 1945 Journal
Croydon, Purley Way First road in the UK to be lit by low-pressure sodium discharge lamps. The installation was by Philips Lamps, Ltd. On the 8th December 1932, invited guests, delegates and dignitaries assembled at Purley Way, Croydon for a short inaugural ceremony followed by celebratory dinner at the neighbouring Croydon Aerodrome. The event was curtly summarised by F. N. Rendell-Baker, Chief Engineer and General Manager, Electricity Department, Croydon, in the Annual Report of the APLE: "The first installation of Sodium Lamps for street lighting purposes in this country was inaugurated in Purley Way, Croydon. A length of one mile of this by-pass road, carrying the main London-Brighton traffic is equipped with 60 Philips Sodium lamps (the Philora DA-90), each of 100-watts DC capacity, mounted in special directional fittings providing a screened light source. The light radiated is of a monochromatic character giving exceptional visual acuity. No attempt has been made to produce a white light on the by-pass road, which is not a shopping thoroughfare; but the new lighting is considered very suitable for fast motor traffic." The inauguration was a huge success and drivers quickly took to the new lighting. Major Richard, writing for the Municipal Journal, summed up current thinking: “With the new system one can drive practically as fast by night without headlamps as one can by day. The system entirely gets over the question of whether or not to use headlamps. In fact, there is a notice at each end of the Purley Way stretch requesting motorists to turn their headlamps off on entering that section of the road. One is now able to drive more by observing the complete outline of other cars than by the suggestion given by their lamps. Another great advantage is that the new lamps do not dazzle the driver." 1936 Journal
Croydon, Purley Way After three years' experience and experiments with the 1932 installation, the visibility obtained and the economy in running, resulted in the Croydon Corporation placing an order with Philips Lamps to increase the original scheme to 235 150W Philora AC sodium lamps (the SO/H) for the original stretch and an additional three miles (the whole length of the road). The 150W lamps will be used in the Liverpool type unit (designed by P. J. Robinson, M.I.E.E. - City Lighting Engineer to Liverpool) and manufactured by the Wardle Engineering Co. The installation was carried out to the instructions of F. N. Rendell-Baker, M.I.E.E., Chief Engineer of Croydon Corporation electricity undertaking. The method of employing the central suspension of the lamps was also new and novel. By September 1936, the installation had been completed and was described as the finest example of trunk road lighting in the world. The lamps are placed 90 feet apart and at a height of 26'. The carriageway is 38' wide whilst the total width of the thoroughfare is 60'. The installation was officially opened by the Mayor Of Croydon, Alderman Arthur Peters, C.B.E., J.P. on September 29th. All glare is eliminated, the effect being that of a softly lighted road illuminated by shaded floodlights. The method of suspension is novel as only half the normal number of poles are required. An important feature of the installation is its running cost as each 150W lamp gives about five times as much light as ordinary lamps of similar wattage and they have a much longer working life. Car headlights are quite unnecessary on this road. (Journal includes night picture.) It is later proposed to erect neon signs at either end of the road requesting motorists to switch off headlights. 1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1936 Journal
Croydon Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Croydon GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. The original installation of just a few lamps has swelled to over 600 with 50 new units just ordered. By 1936 there are 18 miles of mercury vapour lamps with colour correction. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1936 Journal
Croydon To ensure continuity of lighting on the number 54 bus routes through Croydon, electric discharge lamps are to be installed to link up with similar installations. 1937 Journal
Croydon After the success of the Purley Way scheme, two further schemes of Philora sodium street lighting has been planned. On South Norwood Hill and Beulah Hill, 133 100W Philora sodium lamps in Wardle Liverpool units will be used; and 41 similar units will be erected in WHite Horse Lane. All will be placed 90' apart and 25' high on caternary suspension. Mr. F. N. Rendell Baker, M.I.E.E., is the Corporation Electrical Engineer. 1937 Journal
Croydon Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
1938 Journal
Croydon Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Croydon Letter from a motorist from Croydon about driving in fog. The motorist argues that staggered installations cause the motorist to zig-zag along the road as they follow the beams of the lamps; however centrally suspended installations are far better in foggy conditions as the driver just has to follow the lamps in a straight line. (The central suspension refers to the Purley Way, South Norwood Hill or Beulah Hill installations). 1939 Journal
Croydon The Council have recently approved a scheme for the improvement of street lighting in the Edridge Road area which also covers Friends Road, Mint Walk, Fell Road and Mason's Avenue. The are is to be lighted completely by electricity at a cost of £6396. Three additional 1000W lamps are to be installed in Park Lane, while in Green Lane 58 100W sodium lamps are to replace 34 filament lamps. Bingham Road, Addiscombe, is to have 33 sodium lamps. 1939 Journal
Croydon Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Croydon The Council has decided to install war-time steret lighting on main roads, bus routes, trolleybus routes, tram routes and any shopping centres not already covered in this way. All these streets are normally lighting by electric lamps on tall posts (20'-25' mounting height) and the appropiate fittings are being used in each case. 1886 lighting points are covered by the Council's decision, and well over three-quarters of these lamps are already in commission. Careful observations will be made during the coming months, and the Council will consider the advisability of adapting all side and residential road standards in time for next winter. 1940 Journal
Croydon The centre of the town and some three miles of the main London Road were lit to Dim-Out and turned on on the 13th November 1944. The lighting of bus routes inside the Borough (some fifty miles) is now proceeding as fast as man power will permit. Thereafter the side roads - some 200 miles which are not controlled by a master switch - will receive attention. The new street lighting, which is controlled by a master switch at the generating station, will be switched off after a "purple" or "immediate danger" warning and switched on again as soon as "danger past" signal has been received. 1944 Journal
Crystal Palace The fire which destroyed the Crystal Palace proved the sturdiness of modern street lamps and lanterns. Every one of the Osira lamps in GEC bowl refractor lanterns recenlty installed by the County of London Electric Supply Company Limited on Crystal Palace Parade were to be seen with their vivid bluish coloured light in contrast to the fierce red of the burning Crystal Palace. Next morning, every unit was found to be in perfect working order. 1937 Journal
1937 Catalogue
Cullen, Banff For lighting between October and April, the Council have accepted a tender for electic street lighting amounting to £227 per annum. Overhead conductors will be used except on classified roads. This new development will add 7d to the rates. It is typical of many recent contracts and indicates that lighting authorities are perpared to meet increased expenditure if they are convinced improved lighting and service is necessary. The whole town uses electric lighting by 1937. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Cullompton (Devon) Has signed a three year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Cuper The Local Committee has decided to install an installation of 12 electric street lamps in the village of Ceres. The capital cost is estimated at £95, and the scheme will involve a 2¾d. rate. 1938 Journal
Dagenham Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Dagenham An example of the new gas installations includeds 8-light bijou double-way lamps spaced at about 160' with a mounting height of 16'. In the whole area some 1670 lamps are affected by the new contract. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Dagenham Have installed 400 of the new ARP gas conversion units manufactured by Sugg. 1944 Journal
Dalkeith Improvements are being carreid out in the gas lighting of Dalkeith. The agreement with the local gas undertaking has recently been renewed by the Burgh Council. 1939 Journal
Dalziel (Lanarkshire) The County Council of Lanarkshire have entered into a 6-year contract for public lighting by gas in Dalziel. Lamps are to be increased in number and other steps taken to improve the lighting. 1939 Journal
Darlington Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Darlington There are now 2,221 gas lamps in the streets under the control of the County Borough of Darlington. Each lamp is fitted with an automatic control device. 1937 Journal
Darlington Complying with the MOT Final Report requirements, an installation of mercury discharge lighting has recently been completed along Yarm Road, consisting of 54 250W horizontal burning mercury discharge lamps mounted on trolley bus poles, the route length being approximately 3000 yards. A spacing of approximately 120', staggered, is adhered to as nearly as possible, a mounting height of 25' being standardised, except at two low railway arches which are lighted by four 125W mercury lamps. Concurrent with the above installation, modern gas lighting was installed in Woodlands Grove, where 12-light lanterns were erected to provide similar lighting. Improvements are also being carried out in the lighting of a number of main roads and 177 gas lamps of a higher candle power have been substituted for existing lamps. 1939 Journal
Darlington A system of low-pressure gas lighting was installed prior to the war on busy roads in Darlington. It comprised 100 lamps to replace an existing gas lightign system. The gas lamps carry 12 mantles each and are of the suspension type. 1939 Journal
Darlington Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Darlington Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Darlington Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Darwen Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Darwen Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Darwen Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Davyhulme New gas lighting has been installed on the main Barton Road. A distance of 1474 yards is now illuminated by 12-mantle lamps. These are staggereed on either side of the road at intervals of 40' and are mounted on 23'9" columns with an overhang from the curb of 6'3". The installation has been carried out under a five-year contract between the Urmston U.D.C. and the Stretford and District Gas Board. The contract covers all 1,269 gas lamps. 1938 Journal
Deal Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Dechmont (West Lothian) Will have a public lighting installation for the first time. Gas has been chosen as the illuminant under a 10-year contract and three-mantle lamps have been installed. 1939 Journal
Denbigh Denbigh Town Council has renewed its contract for street lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Denby Dale, Yorks. Following a recent meeting of the Lighting Sub-Committee with the Electriciy Supply Co., the Council decided to accept a new quotation based on a lighting period of 1,250 hours per annum. The supply company will retain the ownership of brackets, lanterns, wiring etc., and the Council are to undertake the painting of all metal works and cleaning of lanterns. 1939 Journal
Denton The installation is specified by The United Kingdom Gas Corporation for the local gas undertaking. As per company policy, a demonstration installation of 25 lamps was erected in 1935. After three months, the contract for the whole of the lighting for the town was awarded for ten years. The installation was particularly satisfactory for the kerb line illumination and the light distribution. The permanent installation was erected later in 1935. The whole of the main traffic routes in the town, amounting to 4 miles of roadway, was lit by 130 low-pressure 12-light No.2 size mantle Sugg London gas lamps. They are fitted with constant pressure governors and Comet automatic ignition. The lamps were mounted on the projecting arms of existing tramway standards, by means of a simple bracket arm attachment supplied by Sugg. The service pipes were carried up the side of the column to the lamp through the Horstmann clock controller and Comet igniter, which are strapped to the side of the column. The mounting height was restricted to 23'6". Fortunately the columns were well spaced (130') and allowed a staggered formation to be adopted. Overhang was 3' and the width of the road was 30'. There were 4,300 lumens per 100'. 1938 Journal
1938 Paper
1938 Journal
Deptford Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. Over 100 G.E.C. Lewisham lanterns with 400W MA/V lamps were installed. 1935 Catalogue
Deptford There are 148 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 35 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Deptford A 15 year contract will provide for the complete electrification of Deptford street lighting. Mercury Discharge lamps are to be used throughout. The Council have introduced four classifications for roads in the Borough, according to importance. 400W, 250W, 125W and 80W lamps will be used on the various classes. Over 50 miles will be lit. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Deptford A new system of street lighting was inaugurated in Deptford on the 5th October when the Mayor peformed the switching-on ceremony in the Council Chambers at New Cross by pulling a switch which was in direct contact with the Generating Station in the Stowage, Greenwich. A model lamp in the road indicated when the lights came on and at the same time a lantern picture depicted Pomeroy Street with the old type of lighting changed over to the new. The lighting scheme, when completed, will be the largest street lighting installation of high pressure mercury vapour discharge lamps in the Metropolitan area. 2,000 lamps are in the process of being installed. These comprised 1,032 80W Osira lamps for 26 miles of streets (conforming to Class G, British Standards Specification), 565 125W for 14 miles (B.S.S., Class F), 225 250W for 6 miles of through traffic routes (B.S.S., Class E), and 172 400W units for 4 miles of main roads (B.S.S., Class D), the whole aggregating over fifty miles of streets. The installation was by the GEC using concrete columns (Stanton 1 and Stanton 6). The lanterns were the Fulham Di-Fractor type for the 250W and 400W lamps, and a smaller type of the same lantern, the Small Oxford, incorporating a specially designed inner dome refractor and outer bowl refractor for use with 80W and 125W lamps. The GEC in an advertisement claim that the whole of the borough of Deptford has been graded and relit and 1500 80W and 125W Osira H.P. Mercury Vapour Discharge Lamps were installed. Includes picture. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Deptford The borough has plans to have only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Derby Number of gas lamps increased by 689 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Derby Among 485 new electric lamps in the Borough, 98 Sodium Discharge lamps have been installed on the main roads. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Derby Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
Derby The whole of Derby's street lighting will shortly be electrical. There are 3,887 lamps in the Borough and 676 in the outer areas. 1937 Journal
Derby Approved war-time street lighting in the centre of the city and the major part of the area is now practically completed and the question of providing further lighting is under consideration. 1940 Journal
Devizes 27 units of WASK Up And Down Suspension Gear have been installed on gas lighting columns. 1933 Advert
Dewsbury The Dewsbury Gas Department is responsible for over 95% of street lighting in the town and over 300 modern 12-light gas lamps have now been erected on the main roads. 1938 Journal
Dewsbury A number of gas lighted traffic bollards have been installed by the Gas Department at various busy points in Dewsbury and more are being put in hand. Gas is also being used for street lighting on a new housing estate in the town. 1939 Journal
Dewsbury Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Dewsbury The County Borough of Dewsbury Gas Department has more than 1000 street lamps in use in war-time lighting schemes. 1941 Journal
Diss Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Doncaster War-time fittings which can be used to adapt existing street lamps are to be tried out, the Watch Committee having approved an experimental batch of 24 fittings. 1940 Journal
Doncaster Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Doncaster First installation of Frangible Joint Columns manufactured by Concrete Utilities installed along the A1. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Dorking An interesting installation of street lighting with equipment supplied by BTH has been completed. The stretch of road was illuminated by 200/300W lamps at a low mounting height. The new installation consists of 500W Madza gas-filled lamps in BTH County lanterns mounted at a height of 25' on new steel columns, erected by the Dorking And District Electric Supply Company for the Urban District Council. The route carries exceptionally heavy traffic. 1939 Journal
Douglas, Isle Of Man The erection of addition electric public lamps continues, as well as the improvement of existing standards by the substitution of higher wattage tungsten lamps in modern fittings or by gaseous discharge lamps. The promenade lighting has been improved by 12 double bracket lamps (2x300W) at a mounting height of 24' bringing the illumination to Class "D". Gas lamps within the supply area are converted to electricity as the network is extended. Control is by time switches and by the Oliverpell distant control system; in some areas a cable with an additional core being used to reduce the number of time switches required. 1937 Journal
Douglas, Isle Of Man Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Douglas, Isle Of Man Hard work by the very depleted staff of the Douglas Corporation Electricity Department has about 300 of the town's 671 electric lamps were switched on (to "Dim Out" standards). Probably the most welcome sight was the long string of lights along the Promenades. Side streets as well as the main thoroughfares were reasonably well lighted. 1944 Journal
Dover Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Draycott New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Draycott Draycott Parish Council (Debry) have renewed the contract for gas lighting in their area. 1939 Journal
Droitwich During the summer months, a £600 scheme for modernising the main sections of public lighting in the borough will be executed. This include the erection of new steel poles with Parkinson Maxill and Sugg Rochester lamps with Wask suspension gears and clock controllers with Comet igniters. In addition some 1,000 yards of new lighting with modern square lanterns have been installed on the main Worcester-Birmingham road. 1937 Journal
Dublin First public lighting in Dublin began around 1617 when city authorities ordered that the occupier of every fifth house in every street should erect a public lantern outside his house and light it at six o'clock. Candles were used. The order was only partially obeyed, for nearly 70 years afterwards in 1687, a similar one was issued. To make sure that the order would be obeyed a Committee of the Lord Mayor, two Aldermen and three Councillors was appointed to take the necessary steps. 1939 Journal
Dublin In the early years of the 18th century, it is recorded that the public lamps were supplied with oil made from Irish rapeseed. The same reference adds that it was found desirable to continue the lights for an hour beyond that "at first fixed for their extinguishment - as between it and dawn various offences had been committed." 1939 Journal
Dublin In 1825 gas was first used for public lighting. It was supplied by two companies which later became merged into one. 1939 Journal
Dublin Electric lighting apepared on the Dublin streets in 1892 after the Corporation built a generating station in Fleet Street. Three miles were illuminated that year, and its use spread further after the Pigeon House Station came into operation around 1909. 1939 Journal
Dublin Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
1938 Catalogue
Dublin A mile of Merrion Road has been lit experimentally to meet traffic conditions: very heavy, continuous and fast and includes buses and trams. The route is lined on each side by tramway standards and these have been used as lamp standards. The thoroughfare averages 64' wide and is comprised of a roadway 38'6" wide with a pathway 12'9" on each side. Brackets with a projection of 6' towards the centre of the roadway are mounted on the tops of the tram standards above the span wires. Each bracket is fitted with a four-way adjusting device which permits the mounting of lanterns truly vertical over the road surface irrespective of the setting of the standards in the ground. The lanterns are mounted opposite each other across the roadway and the average spacing is 121'. The average height of the light sources is 25'6". Each lantern is fitted with a 300W incandescent filament lamp. The lanterns cut off all light within 20° of the horizontal plane. They have a well ventilated canopy and body of sheet copper enclosing a single-piece silvered mirror dome reflector with refracting prisms on the outer and silvered surface of the glass. The lantern is open at the bottom and includes no glassware other than the reflector. Focussing is controlled by a single eternal thumbscrew and the lamp filament can be moved not only in a vertical plane but alos in a horizontal plane. The illumination on the road surface averages 1.0 F.C. under the lighting units and 0.33 F.C. at the test point, giving a diversity in illumination of 2.8 : 1. The diversity of brightness is greater than the diversity of illumination and is visible to the eye - this does not effect "visibility". More even brightness can be obtained by altering the focus of the lamps byt the introduction of a more high angle light inevitably increases the brightness of the units and gives rise to a complaint of glare. The concensus of public opinion is that adequate "visibility" is provided for all normal usage of the road and that the variations in road surface brightness are infinitely preferable to even the smallest degree of glare. 1937 Journal
Dublin Graceful lamp standards with a polished marble finish will be erected during the new few months. Over the past few weeks, E.S.B. workmen ahve been preparing the foundations of the new standards in O'Connell Street, Westmoreland Street, College Green, Lower Grafton Street and Dame Street. Bronze lanterns with panels of diffusing glass and specially desgined refractors will be used. The width of the thoroughfares provided a problem for the designers and they believe they have found the solution: the standards are to be erected on the kerbs on each side of the streets and will be directly opposite each other at intervals of approximately 40 yards. The lanterns on each bracket will be 8' apart and in O'Connell Street and College Green the light sources will mounted at 30'. In other streets the height will be 25'. The work is being carried out by the Electricity Supply Board for the Corporation. 1938 Journal
Dublin On behalf of the Dublin Corporation the Electricity Supply Board have begun far-reaching schemes for the improvements of the city's street lighting. The first sections to be relighted are O'Connell and Westmoreland Streets, College Green and Dame Street. Special bronze lanterns are being erected on distinctive standards with a terazzo finish. A total capital expenditure of £52,000 will be incurred in the three-year programme. The Electricity Supply Board, which supplies 247 areas, has added 1,583 street lamps to its mains in twelve months, bringing the total to 22,924. 1939 Journal
Dublin A new system of lighting installed along O'Connel Street, Westmoreland Street, College Green, Lower Grafton Streett and Dame Street will be amongst the best in the world. It comprises of 196 lanterns, all of which with the exception of four, are carried in pairs on 96 reinforced concrete columns. Four lanterns are carried by cast-iron brackets attached to the corners of the plinth of the Nelson Monument. All standards are erected in the kerb lines facing each other across the thoroughfare. In Upper and Lower O'Connell Sreet, on O'Connell bridge, and in College Green, the height of the light sources is 30'. In Westmoreland Street, Dame Street and Lower Grafton Street, the height to the light source is 25'. The concrete is unususal as its made from crushed natural marbles and not broken stone or gravel. Eight different marbles, all quarried in the Italian Alps, were blended, the colours varying from white through greys and greens to black. This was to blend the colour with the background on site. The surfaces are polished and have an appearance similar to terrazzo work of fine texture. The base contains a large cavity for housing of electrical apparatus, access to which is through a door made of concrete framed in non-ferrous metal. The only exposed metals on the standards are the door frames and the suspension points for the lanterns, and to avoid rusting, they are made of aluminium alloys, bronze or brass. The standards require no maintenance other than occasional washing or waxing. All lanterns are identical. All, with the exception of the four mounted on the Nelson Monument, are fitted internally with similar refractor glasses to control the distribution of light. The four mounted on the Nelson Monument are not fitted with any refracting glasses. All exterior metal parts of the lanterns are executed in bronze. A small number of internal metal parts are executed in steel and aluminium alloy, the remainder being made of bronze. An anti-condensaiton chamber is incorporated in the cast bronze head of the each lantern where it is suspending from the bracket. This case head is connected to a second bronze casting which carries the glazed framework by means of an inner spider of aluminium alloy and bronze. The space between the two castings is enclosed by a spun bronze dome. The entire glazed framework swings clear on a hinge to give access to the internal refracting glasses and lamps. The external framework is glazed with a specially selected diffusing glass of low absorption and high quality. The internal refracting units are comprised of three pieces of prismatic glassware, two of which are hermetically sealed together in the form of an inverted bowl with a cavity between its internal and external surfaces, together forming the upper member of the unit. The mouth of the bowl is couvered by the third glass which is shaped like a deep dish. These units form a casing approximating to spherical in shape around the light source or lamp. While practically the entire external surfaces of the refracting units is smooth, the internal surfaces are cut into a series of prism groups whic hrefract or bend the light emitted by the lamps and direct it over the road surface as required through the external diffusing glass panels of the lantern. All lanterns in Upper and Lower O'Connell Street, O'Connell Bridge and in College Green, are fitted with 1500W incandescent filament lamps. The lanterns in Westmoreland Street, Dame Street and Grafton Street are fitted with 1000W incandescent filament lamps. The four lanterns on the Nelson Monument are fitted with 500W lamps. The refracting glassware has been manufactured in special heat resisting glass.

The thoroughfares in which 1000W lamps are used at a mounting height of 25' have a roadway which varies from 35' to 79' in width. The average width is 16'6". The distances between standards along kerblines in these sections varies from 94' to 124', the average being 108'. These measurements necessitated the projection of beams of maximum intensity from the lanterns at the following angles: (a) vertical angle, or "angle of incidence", min 64°, max 71° average 67°; (b) horizontal angle, or "azimuth angle", min 16°, max 40°, average 26°. In general, the lanterns used had to be capable of producing their greatest intensity of light at an angle of 67° in the vertical plane and 26° from the kerblines in the horizontal plane.

The thoroughfares in which 1500W lamps are used at a mounting height of 30' have a roadway which varies from 101' to 121' in width. The average width is 147'6". The distances between standards along kerblines in these sections varies from 66' to 138', the average being 116'. These measurements necessitated the projection of beams of maximum intensity from the lanterns at the following angles: (a) vertical angle, or "angle of incidence", min 65½°, max 73½° average 69½°; (b) horizontal angle, or "azimuth angle", min 40°, max 67°, average 46½°. In general, the lanterns used had to be capable of producing their greatest intensity of light at an angle of 69½° in the vertical plane and 46½° from the kerblines in the horizontal plane.

1939 Journal
Dublin In August 1945, the first experimental installation in the British Isles, using tubular fluorescent lamps for public lighting. In Eglington Road, 6 switch start 5ft. 80W semi-trough fittings were centrally suspended on wires usings Siemens daylight lamps. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Dudley Seven REVO Dudley Decorative Cats Iron Standards and Dudley Lanterns have been erected around tne newly built Municipal Building which was formally opened on the 2nd December 1935. The columns are 20 ft. high, mounted at spacings of 70 ft., and the lanterns perform a two-fold purpose by both illuminating the thoroughfare and the buildings. Lanterns are of cast iron with brozne finish and house gas-filled lamps of 500W capacity. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Dudley Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Dufftown Previously lit by paraffin lamps, Dufftown will have an electric lighting scheme in operation by the autumn. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Dukinfield A ten-year agreement for gas lighting in Dukinfield has been entered into by the Corporation. The contract covers some 653 lamps and embodies various improvements in the lighting. 1939 Journal
Dumfries The Electrical Engineer has been asked by the Lighting Committee to prepare a scheme for the lighting of certain streets by sodium discharge lighting. 1938 Journal
Dunbarton Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Dungannon A new street lighting contract for a period of three years has been entered into by the Dungannon Urban Distrcit Council, specifying gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Dunstable Watling Street lit by equipment using GEC High Pressure Mercury Lamps. 1938 Advert
Dunster This Somerset area is to have gas lighting for the first time as a result of a new seven-year agreement under which gas will replace the existing installation. At the Parish Assembly which decided on the change-over, it was stated that the demonstration gas lamp gave 100% better lighting than an existing unit; in spite of the large increase in lighting, the annual increased charge will only be £3 10s. 1938 Journal
Dunster As a result of the new installation of gas lighting in DUnster, residents are claiming to ahve the best lighted village in West Somerset. The improvement is the result of a seven-year contract recently completed. 1939 Journal
Durham A start has been made to change the street lighting at Chester-le-Street from gas to electricity as a result of a ten-year agreement entered into by the Urban District Council. The annual cost will amount to £1834 which involves a saving on lighting expenditure of a 3d. rate. 1939 Journal
Ealing Have installed the new BTH Mercra H lantern in 1937. 1937 Advert
Ealing REVO have installed a mercury scheme on Greenford Road. 104 C9018 fittings with Philora 400W lamps have been installed on REVO Regent columns. Spacing is 150' with a mounting height of 25'. The roadway has an average width of 50'. 1937 Journal
East Challow, Wantage The Wessex Electricity Co. have secured a 10-year agreement with the parish council for the provision of street lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
East Dean East Dean Parish Council is to carry out improvements in street lighting under a renewal of its gas lighting contract for part of its area. 1938 Journal
East Grinstead Electric lighting has been in operation in the streets almost from the earliest months of the electricity undertaking. About 12 months ago it was felt that the higher standard was desirable and a new scheme was decided upon using 140W sodium lamps in BTH Sodra "H" lanterns. The installation consisting of 22 lanterns, each mounted at 25', with an average spacing of 140' was completed last autumn, and after its success, an exetension of another 20 lanterns will be erected soon (as soon as the present international situation permits i.e. war.) At one point the road is over 80' in width and therefore the BTH Sodra "H" lantern, which has a very wide beam spread, is particularly suitable. It is designed to give, at an angle of 84° representing a distance of 240' at the customary 25' mounting height an intensity of over 75% of the main beam thus ensuring a continious surface brightness as far as the road surface will permit. The two refractor panels diffuse the light and tend to eliminate glare, as well as redirecting downward a large amount of light which would otherwise be wasted. 1940 Journal
East Ham County Borough have accepted a tender for 269 Sieray electric discharge points in the borough. 126 of these points will be erected on traction standards on trolley bus routes and the remainder on new columns. The Borough Council have received sanction to borrow nearly £8000 for the installation of mercury discharge lighting on the main road. Later advertisement states that over 500 units of Sieray Type "H" Lamps in Bi-Way lanterns have been installed in East Ham and Barking. 1937 Journal
1937 Journal
1938 Advert
1945 Journal
East Ham It is proposed to install mercury discharge lighting in Barking Road at a cost of £1003. 1938 Journal
East Ham The Council proposes to improve the lighting of Romford Road by installing mercury discharge lamps at a cost of £1470. 1939 Journal
East Kilbride Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads and certain side roads by Lanark County Council. 1940 Journal
Eastbourne Organised street lighting commenced in 1852 with the introduction of gas lighting, which consisted of flat flame burners lit by a torch. Square-type gas lanterns were used. In a gale, the lights blew out as fast as they were lit, and the lighter had to climb each post and use matches. Each column housed a gas meter but was necessary due to the erratic consumption of the early gas burners. (The meters were housed in the bases of the columns). The meters were read by three representative officials who used a horse-and-trap as a conveyance. A horse-and-trap was also used by the local engineer to visit jobs; instructions were passed from the engineer to workers via a small boy who ran behind the horse-and-trap. The same small boy had to rise early every morning to go around knocking up all the lamp-lighters.

22 arc-lamps were installed in 1882. Eastbourne was the first town on the South Coast to supply electricity for public lighting from a central station. The lamps were connected in series across 1200 VDC through special mains from a machine known as a Brush Company's Arc Lighter. Each lamp had an automatic cut-out which short circuited the lamp if the carbons failed. The machine frequently gave trouble and on one occasion the armature burst causing considerable damage.

In 1898 Welsbach incandescent burners with mica chimneys were introduced for the gas lamps and the conversion took four years to complete. The burner cost 7s. 6d. and each mantle cost 2s. 3d. This burner was operated by means of chains dropped through a hole in the glass of the lantern, and in a wind it was a job to capture the small rings at the ends.

In 1902 the original arc-lamps were replaced by Gilbert arc-lamps which were run in series on 2,200V supplied from a constant current transformer. Later the number of Gilbert arc lamps was extended, the later ones being connected on 100V through a transformer and choke. The annual charge per "arc column" prior to 1902 was £30, in 1902 it was £25 and in 1904 it was £22.

In 1904 an Incandescent Gas Company burner was substituted in the gas lamps and was a considerable improvement. Lamp-lighters were paid 22s. per week and had one day off in three weeks.

The first short column electric lighting was commenced in 1905 as new roads were built. The fitting used was known as the Reason G type and carried two 30W lamps with saucer-shaped glass reflectors. Also around this time Nernst 16cp lamps; they were very efficient but gave constant trouble with the heater cut-outs, so they were abandoned in favour of metal filament lamps.

In 1908 further improvements took place with the adoption of inverted fittings and mantles for the gas lamps.

In 1913 the Gilbert arc-lamps were replaced. Trials took place with Oliver Magazine and Excello Flame arc-lamps but in the end enclosed German Sunshine arc-lamps were used.

All street lighting was extinguished during the First World War.

After the Armistice, the arc-lamps interiors were replaced by 300W GLS lamps. At this point, there were 1625 gas lamps and 243 electric lamps in the town.

In 1918 it was decided to convert gradually all gas lighting to electric lighting. This was carried out by fitting a 60W lamp with, first, a straight bracket and then a swan-neck bracket. These replaced the old square gas lanterns.

In 1921 the old converted arc-lamp fittings were placed by fittings carrying a glass refractor and outer globes, which was one of the first lanterns designed for GLS. The use of this fitting with tall cast iron columns was extended through all the main streets between 1921 and 1926.

In 1928 nearly all the short columns with square glazed gas lanterns had been converted to electric lighting. All new lamps had a short swan neck bracket and enamelled reflector.

In 1930 all side street wattages had been increased to 100W and all corners to 200W.

In 1932, the authority decided that full control of the street lighting department was transferred to the Borough Electrical Engineer from the Borough Surveyor.

1938 Paper
Eastbourne The period 1932 to 1936 was seen as a brief lull when only routine improvements took place.

All the old square glazed gas lanterns remaining (687) on short cast iron columns were removed and replaced by modern brackets giving a mounting height of 15'. (By coincidence this matched the forthcoming Interim and Final MOT Reports). The bracket was made in one length of seamless 1" steam barrel. In the past there had been rusting of the tubes near the mid-bracket foliation and the spigot cap, so it was arranged that these would made of iron and cast onto the barrel. An unusual and novel feature of the bracket was that it was designed to unobtrusively house a selenium bridge housing (see Radiovisor) for a light-sensitive switching housing if required. The bridge is housed in a special housing just above the lantern. However, in the vast majority of cases, they were not using light sensitive control apparatus and therefore the housing was fitted with a lead cap.

At one time the intensive use of light sensitive apparatus was considered and this led to the special design of the bracket as shown above, but:

  • About this time that the superimposed high-frequency remote control systems were becoming known.
  • It was difficult to get a group of individual light operated apparatus to operate together.
  • It could only be used for all-night lighting.
  • It prevented subsequent alteration of burning hours.
Therefore light sensitive apparatus was used for bollard and direction sign control when dusk-to-dawn is appropiate. (Also see County Court decision regarding bollard lighting).

Light sensitive control is used in the indication of daylight values and operation of signals in connection with a centralised control system.

Some of the lighting is by time switches, either by large capacity time switches, energising switch wires from sub-stations, or by individual time switches in lamp posts. The large capacity time switches gave little trouble. However, in the case of small individual post time-switches, considerable trouble was met:

  • The spindle of the high speed type wasn't lubricated in the jewelled bearings sufficiently.
  • Some spindles were too thin.
  • The spindles were not sufficiently hardened.
  • Jewels were insufficiently polished; polishing powder left in jewels; cracked jewels.
  • The switches were too weak.
  • The contacts were too small. (They did not appear to take into account that filament street lighting has a high initial current).
Switch wires were all under ground and took the form of an extra conductor in the distributor cables. Since the lighting was not reduced at midnight, no further action was necessary, but it was considered that distributor cables with two street lighting cores may have an advantage.

Overhead switch wires have not been used in the town area, but is used in rural areas.

A considerable part of the area is controlled by hand-switching methods, but this is being reduced by the extension of automatic control. The switching staff consists of one Inspector, one Assistant Inspector, 13 full-time lamp-lighters and 3 half-time lamp-lighters. The Inspectors patrol all the lamp-lighters' rounds each evening and arrange for reliefs when necessary. Each man has a starting and finishing lamp, and reports lamps that have failed at 8AM each morning. The full-time lamp-lighters are employed during the morning as cleaners, fitters and erectors. The half-time lamp-lighters are also employed by the Highways Department as road sweepers (but their role will be dispensed with as automatic control expands). Each round is restricted to an average of 100 lamps-per-man, for which he is allowed one-hour actual switching, finishing up at lighting-up time. The cost of switching is 16s. 0d. per column per annum. The introduction of automatic control was delayed as switch wires, or pilot cables, were not available in many streets. Small time switches were considered but owing to the troubles already experienced, and partly due to the high cost of a time switch, this was not proceeded with. Secondly, a large number of light-sensitive units was considered but rejected (although the standard bracket was designed for this purpose). Therefore an improved form of control using relays operated by a high-frequency impulse superimposed on the existing distribution system is being used. It was installed in a restricted area, and due to its success, has been considerably extended, and is replacing the hand-switched rounds.

It was decided to standardise on a suitable lantern for side-street lighting (to replace the old square glazed gas lamps). Various types of 100-200W GLS fittings using either reflectors or refractors were erected under identical conditions in a trial street. After inspection and completion of photometric and other tests, it was decided to standardise on a fitting with a non-axial asymmetric refractor. No outer globes were used as these absorb 10% of the light output and the difference in cleaning time is neglible. Reflector fittings, particularly those of the multi-facet type, are efficient and extensively used in rural areas, but as many of the fittings in the town were refractors, then this factor had a considerable influence on the final decision. When the fitting was decided upon, alternative combinations of cast-iron, copper and steel were considered for the body, but on the grounds of durability, it was decided to use copper. The lower reflector carries the refractor on special bronze springs, so designed as to facilitate easy removal for cleaning. The refractor is in one piece in which are formed lenticular prisms in two main directions, with vertical and annular prisms to give directional control to light emitted in the upper hemisphere. The asymmetric disposal of the main beams is each 12½ from the axis, and the beam width is broad enough to spread completely across the road. The fittings are mounted at 15', standard side street spacing of 120', and give 0.82f.c. under the lamp and 0.17f.c. a B.S.S test point i.e. almost to Class G standard. Illumination under the lamp is reduced to 0.66f.c. after 1000 hours burning but this does not affect appearance and the lumen output per 100' under average conditions is 717.

For road junctions, where lamp failure may be source of danger, a two-light fitting, which is two of the refractor lanterns in one, is fitted. The refractors are each the standard non-axial asymmetric, or symmetric, depending on the type of junction. It is realised that a certain amount of efficiency is lost due to the "blanketing" effect of two refractors in close proximity, but it was felt that the twin fitting should match closely in appearance the ordinary single fitting.

The majority of the Group B roads in Eastbourne are lighted as described with the exception that on all bus routes, which are not lit as Group A roads, 150W lamps (giving 0.25f.c. at the test point) are fixed instead of 100W. Also at all important junctions, Group B bus routes are illuminated by a 250W MA/V and three 100W GLS lamps mounted at 25', enclosed in a lantern of the dispersive type.

One of the most important annual features is the issuing of specification and obtaining tenders in connection with the supply of materials, especially lamps. Advertisements are issued in December, tenders asked for by January, allowing time for investigations and recommendations before April. Lamp tenders are required to supply a list of undertakings to whom they have supplied lamps in quantity in the past three years, and a certificate of test by the National Physical Laboratory or similar. Samples of lamps are also obtained from various manufacturers and are tested in the Test Room. Illumination values are recorded when new and after a certain length of life. Voltages are regulated and the life of each lamp recorded. These test results are invaluable when chosing a contract.

A number of columns and bollards are knocked down or damaged each year. The average is 20 per annum and the total value of the resultant claims is £60. However, insurance companies only offer to pay 50% of the damage, but pay the full amount in the end. This is influenced by the fact that if there is doubt as to responsibility, then no claim is made.

One advantage of hand switching is that the lamp-lighter is able to note any lamp failures on his round. These are presented on a form to the Inspector when reporting for his half-day's ordinary duties at 8AM. Lamps out in the automatically controlled areas are noted either by the Inspectors or by the Police. Each morning the Inspector visits the Police Station and receives a list of lamps reported as being out. In the case of the more important lamps any failures are replaced at once the sme evening by a man on duty for the purpose until 11PM - the Inspector arranges in the mornings the replacement of the other lamps. The identificaiton of posts is facilitated by the numbering which is carried out by means of a neat, thin zinc plate with stencilled numbering. This system is better than painting as they are more discernible at height and not obliterated when the column is repainted. For short columns, box tricycles are used, the lamps and cleaning materials being carried in the box and a short ladder fitted to carry along the box. For tall column work, three hand tower wagons and a motor tower wagon are available.

A form covering lamp failures is completed each morning by the Inspector. On this the life of each lamp is calculated. No difficulty is experienced in obtaining free replacements for lamps which have definitely failed prematurely and the average life of lamps is:

  • Sodium discharge: 3000 hours.
  • Mercury discharge: 2000 hours.
  • Tungsten filament: 1000 hours.
There is claimed to be a relation between lamp renewals and weather conditions. However, it is not believed there is a connection between rain, but there are a high number of lamp renewals after high winds or high humidity. General renewals also appear to be high when there is a continuous period of rain. Sodium lamps are broken up in a bucket with iron piping and water is applied from a distance.

Attention has to be given to appearance and preservation given the salt laden air and hot summer sun. One coat of paint is applied every two to three years by brush rather than spray gun. Spray guns were used but discarded because:

  • The round surface tends to cause excessive waste of paint.
  • The resultant coat is thin.
  • Time is wasted cleaning out the gun between columns.
  • Spray of paint may fall on a passer-by.
Experiments with a system of brush painting in which the paint is continuously fed to the brush pneumatically through the handle are on-going. Mid-green has been adopted for general use. Various paints have been tried, and a hard-gloss enamel paint has been adopted. Six tall columns per day are painted at an average cost of 9s.3d. per column, and 4s.10d. for short columns.

Cleaning of lamps is carried out in the morning by 10 of the light-lighters at an annual cost of £487, or 3s.8d. per column per annum. Each lamp is cleaned on an average of every five weeks, but some are cleaned every two weeks. (The accumulated dirt is such as to reduce the lumen output by 10%).

The records are much the same as those used by most street lighting authorities. One, which is invaluable, is a complete set of ordnance plans of 1/1,250 scale of the whole of the town. On these plans are plotted all lamp positions with the column number adjacent. The colour of the plot or ring indiciates the light source (red for filament; blue for mercury; amber for sodium) and the shape of the point indicates the type and make of fitting and wattage of lamp. All switch wires are indicated by red lines connecting these points and in addition the time switch or other control positions are clearly indicated.

The costs are met entirely from the General Rate, and for 1938, the figure is estimated at £18,310, representing 5.09d. in the pound. The costing of items (shown separately) are facilitated by the use of allocation numbers:

  • PL.1.A. : Switching etc.
  • PL.1.B. : Cleaning.
  • PL.2 : Sundries.
  • PL.3 : Transport.
  • PL.4.A : Repairs.
  • PL.4.B : New lamps.
  • PL.5 : Light sensitive apparatus.
  • PL.6 : High frequency impulse control.
  • PL.7 : Improvements (Class B Roads).
  • PL.8 : Parade decoration work.
  • PL.9 : Improvemetns (Class A roads).
A book is kept for chargeable work, each job being given a separate number. The total amount of chargeable work in 1938 amounted to £922.

The estimated consumption of electricity for 1938 was 1,412,000 units at 1.25d per unit, which is an average figure for towns the type and size of Eastbourne. The consumption of electricity is arrived at by meter readings. Meters are fixed in columns with lamps of different wattages, and from the readings of several of these meters, an average is taken. In some cases, where meters are difficult to fix, the reading is calculated from burning hours and the wattages.

1938 Paper
Eastbourne Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. The Avenue and Kings Drive have been lit with sodium lamps. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
1943 Journal
Eastbourne The period from 1934 to 1938 was marked by the introduction of the discharge lamp and the installation of the superimposed high-frequency control system.

In 1934, it was decided to improve the lighting of the main approach roads to the town and also the main shopping streets. This followed a trial of mercury discharge lamps on eight tall steel columns. It was immediately realised that the optical value and efficiency of discharge lighting as a road illuminant outweighed the objections as to colour. Therefore there was no question that discharge lighting in one form or other. Therefore Eastbourne was a pioneer installer of mercury vapour lamps (MA) in 1934 (as mentioned in GEC catalogue from 1935).

In 1937, the expenditure for main road lighting was £2,538 and for improvements on side roads it was £718. For 1938, these figures were £2,209 for main roads, and £617 for side roads. For 1939, it is estimated that these figures will be £4,310 for main roads (this includes the lighting of main roads in an area added to the County Borough) and £750 for side roads.

The layout for main roads could be separated into two types:

  • Motor approach roads lined principally by residences.
  • Shopping streets lined by fairly high buildings and shops.
It was decided to improve a certain number of each type of road in each of the aforementioned financial years until all the roads were relit. At the time, sodium discharge lighting was becoming better known, and considerable trial installations comprising of 40 fittings in 9 sections of both sodium and mercury discharge lighting were installed in various fittings. Photometer tests at B.S.S. test points were taken. All the results were set out in concise form so that every detail, including the prices and running costs etc., were available for the information of the visiting committee.

The decision was then arrived at to light the main approach roads by sodium discharge lighting and the shopping streets by mercury discharge blended with filament lighting. The success of this decision has been so obvious that the authorities have not had the slightest hesitation in continuing the principle in the following years.

There is much controversy on the question of sodium discharge lighting or mercury discharge lighting and non-cut-off fittings and cut-off fittings. However, when applied to sodium lighting, the question of non-cut-off and cut-off is exaggerated due to the low intrinsic brightness of sodium. Sodium is used as the light source for all approach roads: it is the most efficient light source (at 60 lumens per watt), chromatic aberration is eliminated and visual acuity is greater than with polychromatic sources, the instrinsic brightness is low (10 c.p. per sq. c.m., compared with 600-900 c.p. per sq. c.m. in a filament lamp and 100 c.p. per sq. cm. in a mercury lamp) so the risk of glare is low, the contrast of objects is on a road is very marked and the lamps are least affected as regards lumen output by voltage changes. Therefore the lamp was selected for motor roads where good visibility and clear distance perception are the most important requirements.

The lighter the road surface the better the visibility e.g. a near matt concrete surface is better than a rough stoned asphalte surface. However once the asphalte had developed a high degree of polish then the road surface showed a very high degree of specular reflection. Therefore it would appear that concrete roads present the best type of road surface for lighting, but concrete road surfaces are not considered to be permanent and are usually covered with a bituminous material. And asphalted roads with a dressing of stone chippings are the only surface considered best from an economy, non-skid, durability point of view. Therefore the Street Lighting Engineer, from a colour point of view, must not look for any assistance from the Road Engineer.

The type of fitting to be used with sodium lighting was the next thing to be decided. The three main types were:

  • Reflector fittings with controlled cut-off
  • Refractor fittings with controlled cut-off
  • Fittings with a definite cut-off at 75° from the vertical. However glare not considered a problem so fitting not considered.
Therefore the choice was made on (a) relative efficiency, (b) consideration of light distribution and (c) price. Therefore a fitting was chosen with the light source located horizontally, and providing high efficiency with a system of silvered glass mirror reflectors. In addition to utilising the light emitted upwards by projecting it downwards in two wide asymmetric beams, the lower reflectors can be adjusted independently entirely to screen the source in either or both directions if this is required. With the horizontal source and the type of reflectors, the two main asymmetric beams are very wide and therefore illuminate the area adjacent to the thoroughfare itself. This is essential, from the point of view of motorists, as it forms part of the necessary backgorund and should be well lighted to lessen the danger due to emerging objects. In this way the feeling of being in a tunnel is avoided.

The output of the lanterns is 6,600 lumens, or 4,400 per 100' at 150' staggered spacing which conforms to the MOT Recommendation. The B.S.S. test point illumination is 0.15f.c. which is equivalent to B.S. Class E. Where 120' staggered spacing is adopted the lumens per 100' is 5,500 giving a B.S.S. test point illumination of 0.31f.c. which is Class D. After 2,800 hours, the initial output in lumens of 9,600 has fallen to 6,900 and the foot-candle test under the lantern from 1.3 to 0.97. The lighting shows little worsening in appearance and does not fall below Class E.

The main shopping streets required different treatment from the approach roads. The illumination should be the same as the approach roads but other considerations were taken into account: where most of the "life" of the town concentrates, the appearance by night must be considered important; the buildings and foot walks lining the street must have a good aspect; the colour of the light must be considered, principally becuase the ratio or pedestrian traffic to road traffic is high; and the shop window displays are lit by the street lighting when the shop window lighting is extinguished but before pedestrian traffic has finished. The apperance of the installation must be in keeping with the importance of the thoroughfare and therefore highly scientific fittings may be out-of-place and unsightly. The light must be as close to daylight as possible; therefore both filament and mercury discharge lamps were used. It was decided in the main thoroughfares to house one 400W mercury discharge lamp with three 100W filament lamps in each fitting, giving an efficiency of 30.9 lumens per watt; and in the secondary thoroughfares one 250W mercury discharge with three 75W filament lamps, giving 24.1 lumens per watt. The use of this blended mercury lamp restricts the choice of lantern. A lantern was found in which the light sources are entirely enclosed. The distribution of light is symmetrical, substantially in the lower hemisphere, and the panels are constructed of a special low absorption diffusing glass which mixes the radiations from the two types of sources. The fittings are mounted at 25' and spaced at 120'. The output of the larger wattage lanterns is 10,240 lumens or 8,530 lumens per 100' at 120' staggered spacing, giving a test point illumination of Class D. The output of the smaller wattage lanterns is 5620 lumens, or 4683 lumens per 100' at 120' staggered spacing, giving test point illumination Class E.

The whole principle of the lighting of a shopping street, where congestion of road and pedestrian traffic must be taken care of, is completely different from that of a motor road where road and kerb illumination is almost the only consideration. The generally accepted standard of high road brightness and visibility by silhouette, which is apparently correct for traffic routes, does not apply so much to shopping streets where it is important that people see, or are seen, by direct vision. Silhouette vision does apply to a certain extent, of course, where the shopping street is not congested, but is of secondary importance. Therefore the only way to illuminate them satisfactory is by direct illumination. This is the case of a point duty policeman: silhouette vision would be useless and dangerous, whilst direct illumination is hardly sufficient. After experiements, it was found necessary, completely independent of the street lighting, to have a special cut-off fitting, of a distribution giving no spread directly above the policeman.

To obtain public opinion on discharge lighting, a questionaire was distributed to local bus drivers, policemen and a number of residents. It could be seen that sodium discharge illumination was preferred for general road visibility. Of the residents, 100% considered the discharge lighting a considerable improvement on filament lighting, and 56% preferred the blended mercury to the sodium lighting.

In the case of shopping streets, before the improvements, there were already cast iron columns with heavy round arm ornamental brackets supporting high wattage filament lamps at a height of 19'. When the first improvement took place, it was decided to remove the heavy round arm and substitute a steel extension piece with new round arm bracket so that the mounting height was 25'. The steel extension was spigoted into the top and a steel tube ran from the bracket through the centre of the cast iron column where a steel "spider" was threaded on the tube and, on being tightened up into the top of the base, held the extension piece in vertical compression on the top of the column. This was carried out in one street only but there were disadvantages: the erratic positioning of the old columns was not well suited to modern standards; the cast iron bases would not withstand an impact to the same extent as a steel column; the steel spider required periodic tightening; and the cost was no less than the alternative of scrapping the columns and setting out a properly planned installation of modern steel columns.

The general use of steel columns of modern slender design was then decided upon for both shopping streets and the main approach roads.

In one section of an approach road there were some tramway columns with mounting height of the existing filament lamps of 19'. Since these are steel it was not as conclusive as the cast iron, although they had disadvantages as no base for gear accommodation and a too low mounting ehight. As an experiment, one of the tramway brackets has been altered to give the new mounting height of 25' (with an upward sloping bracket).

The new columns are constructed of fluted tubular steel of high tensile strength and pleasing appearance. The base portion is a large diameter tube, part of which is cut away to house discharge lighting gear, and is provided with a hinged door. This removes the necessity for an old boxed out base or the unslightly alternative of fixing the gear externally to the tube high up the column. Steel columns are much lighter in weight and can be more roughly handled than cast iron or concrete, and this shows in transport and erection costs. A foreman and five labourers can erect an average of three columns per day at 26s.3d. per column. After four days of "setting", one fitter and two other men erect the arms, scrollwork and lantern by means of the motor tower wagon. They further fit the equipment in the base and carry out the wiring. Two columns per day are compelted by this fitter and the cost is 26s.1d.: therefore total labour cost, apart from servicing, per column is £3 6s. 1d. One further advantage of steel is that when underground obstructions are met, special roots such as cranked offset or flanged root can be used.

With brackets, the modern tendency for straight lines is preferred instead of the former round arm ornamental brackts and the overhang is regulated to suit the width of the road and the light distribution of the fitting. To avoid trees and obstructions, 10' overhang from the kerb are necessary. This is considered preferable to suspension lighting. This long overhang does not interfere with the kerb and footwalk illumination, this being due to a fitting with a broad beam spread in the case of sodium lighting, and the use of a lantern with symmetrical distribution in the case of the mercury lighting.

The disadvantages of a centrally suspended systems are obvious: low kerb visibility and the tendency of drivers to drive along the lane of light on the crown of this road (although this does not necessarily apply in the case of specially designed short spaced cut-off installations).

Also considered is the daylight apperance of the installation: overhead wires are not things of beauty, particularly those for central suspension systems. Span wires do not find favour with the Fire Brigade Services either.

The initial cost per column of sodium installations, including erection, jointing and reinstatement averages £25 10s, and at 150' staggered spacing, this averages £897 per mile. The running cost per column per annum for lighting and maintaining one 150W sodium discharge lamp on all-night lighting (3905 hours) amounts to £6 6s, which is £223 per mile. The practice in Eastbourne is to reduce the lighting by approximately half at midnight on main roads and so the running cost is £162 per annum per mile.

The initial cost per column of blended-mercury, including erection, jointing and reinstatement, averages £28 and at 150' staggered spacing averages £985 per mile, and for 120' staggered spacing, £1231 per mile. The running cost per annum of lighting and maintaining one 400W mercury and 300W filament lamps on all-night lighting amounts to £18 8s. The practice is to extinguish the filament lamps at midnight and therefore the running cost is £14 13s per column per annum.

The initial cost per column for the 15' Group B installation is £8 16s, complete with service, reinstatement and one 100W filament lamp. The running cost of this per annum assuming all-night lighting is £2 5s 8d per column.

In 1934 it was seen that the necessity would arise from some system of automatic control to replace hand switching. Around this time a form of remote control system which did not require the existance of pilot wires was introduced, and it was decided to install an initial installation confined to the equivalent of one hand-switched round i.e. approximately 100 lamps. This installation was one of the first in the country, and after a certain amount of teething trouble, has operated since very satisfactorily. This installation consisted of a high frequency transmitter situated in a sub-station and from thsi the impulse signal was superimposed on the distribution network. The impulse operates the relays fitted in the column bases, which will either turn on or extingush the lamps. The local transmitter, each of which operates up to 200 relays, is a spark gap high-frequency generator with an output frequency of 4000 cycles. For each switching operation this high frequency impulse is superimposed for a period of four sections between the neutral bus-bar and the earth connection in the substation and the relays in the individual lamp columns are operated by this impulse. The local transmitter is set to emit three impulses per twenty-four hours, and relays react accordingly (at dusk, midnight and dawn). For two years, the initial installation was operated without extension in order to give the system a proper trial. There were teething troubles (a) paused by some old services not being lead covered and having poor earth return and (b) the occasional erratic operation of the spark gap which operated some relays and not others (this disappeared after adjustment and improvement of the spark gap design). After two years trial, it was decided to put down two further installations, and these gave a similar experience to the initial trial area. Until very recently, each of the three transmitters was operated by an astronomical dial time switch with three arms set for the three impulse operations. In April 1938, this was replaced by a central control: this consists of a master transmitter of the valve type which superimposes a high frequency impulse of 1900 cycles on the nearest low tension network via blocking condensers. This impulse potential is stepped up to the high voltage network via the existing supply transformers, and is available if required for use at every sub-station on the high voltage network. This master impulse is received at the local transmitters by means of sensitive maisn relays employing a Thermionic value in duplicated for reliability. This receiving relay closes the contactor circuit of the local transmitter for the four seconds required. The master impulse was controlled by a time switchm but as an eningeer was always on duty at the power station it was decided he should operate the transmitter depending on weather conditions. To give the engineer the necessary indication, light senstivie bridges are fitted on the roof of the control room, and these opearte relays which operate signal bells. (A time switch operates another signal and the difference in times between the time switch and actual switch on was noted). The local transmitters cost £50, the master transmitter cost £100 and the relays were 50s each.

1935 Catalogue
1938 Paper
Eastbourne In a 1938 Paper, the future developments of Eastbourne's street lighting were outlined. It isn't known if these were implemented.

There is still a great deal to be done, before the whole town can be said to be well and efficienty lighted to the standards suggested by the MOT.

Main Road Lighting: There will be no deviation of the policy of sodium discharge lamps for the approach roads and blended mercury for shopping streets and town centres. In Germany and Holland, exactly the same policy is followed. Blending filament lamps are extinguished after midnight and this is also the custom in Eastbourne. At first the mercury lamps were extinguished at midnight, leaving the filament lamps for all-night lighting. But it was found at B.S.S. test points:

  • Both illuminated: Class E: 7880 lumens per 100'.
  • Filament only: Class G: 1330 lumens per 100'.
  • Mercury discharge only: Class F: 6550 lumens per 100'.
One advantage of the blended lighting is that it is flexible and the blending can be varied.

Experiments were tried with filament-and-sodium-discharge and sodium-and-mercury-discharge lamps in the same lantern, but this did not result in the blending of the light, but the superimposition of one on the other.

The luminescent mercury discharge lamp was tried but the initial cost of the lamp is rather high compared with its rather limited colour correction value and reduced efficiency. There were also general doubts as whether the colour corrections will continue at the same value through the lamp's life.

Side Road Lighting: Considerable work is required before these could be considered as illuminated to MOT standards. The standard of lighting of the side roads generally is higher than most towns, and headlights are not necessary in most roads. Most of the new roards and roads on housing estates are already to Group B standards. In some of the older districts, erratic spacing, varied mounting heights and shading by trees are common.

Graded Lighting: Experiments are being carried out with the grading of certain secondary roads at the point where they meet main approach roads (sodium) or shopping streets (blended mercury). The MOT Report does advise grading. The policy is of erecting low wattage sodium lamps between a sodium lit road and a filament lit side road; and low wattage mercury lamps are erected between a mercury lit road and a filament lit side road. Two 65W sodium lamps used for grading but 50W and 100W soidum will be tried as the auxiliary apparatus for these three sizes is the same. In the case of mercury, one 125W and one 80W mercury intervene.

  • Sodium grading: 6600 lumens (main road), 2835 lumens (grading), 860 lumens (side road).
  • Mercury grading: 10240 lumens (main road), 3240 lumens (grading), 860 lumens (side road).

Statistics show that 38% of the accidents occur in side roads i.e. almost a proportion of two to every three on main roads.

1938 Paper
Eastbourne In South Street, the County Borough of Eastbourne was the first authority to install wall mounted tubular fluorescent lanterns fixed horizontally in a public thoroughfare, so their light source was parallel to the road. [Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974]


Eccles Will be spending £1000 on electric lighting in 1937. 1937 Advert
Eccles Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Eccles Approved war-time street lighting will sonn be operating on main bus routes. 1940 Journal
Eccles Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Eccleston Is installing modified war-time gas street lighting. 1941 Journal
Eckington (York) Improvements are to be carried out in the lighting under a new two-year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Edenbridge Have signed a 3-year agreement for gas street lightin. 1937 Journal
Edmonton ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Edinburgh Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Edinburgh The city trialled the Humpreys system of gas lighting from the USA. This required gas lamps to be fitted with electric fans to improve the light intensity. 1937 Paper
Edinburgh The Public Utilities Committee of the Edinburgh Corporation recommend that the gas department should allow a rebate of £2000 to the lighting department on gas used for current lighting. The money is to be used exclusively for the improvement of lighting in gas-lighted streets. 1936 Journal
Edinburgh Number of gas lamps increased by 546 from 1935 to 1936. The street lighting will cost the Corporation this year £15,000, an increase of £4,500 on last year's estimate. The reason for the increase is the rapid extension of the city's boundaries. Edinburgh now has 379 miles of lighted streets, of which gas lights 251 miles. 1937 Journal
Edinburgh By 1937, 153 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1937 Advert
Edinburgh The Town Council of Edinburgh has voted the sum of £36,000 to be spent on lighting improvements over a period of three years. During this current year, £12,000 will be spent. Includes street plan and night photograph. Over four miles of Fairmilehead Tram Route is lit by 250W Mercury Vapour Lamps. Chokes and condensers are mounted in a special pole top box of pleasing design, a departure from the usual letter-box type. The box also houses the high frequency relay, as the whole scheme is controlled from two sub-stations. Lamps are placed on the outside of bends, and the far corner of road junctions are lit on the traffic side. On main routes, 40 yard spacings are aimed at, and in side streets, 50 yard spacings are used. In Sighthill Housing Scheme, the 150W filament lamps are spaced at 40-50 yards apart. Edinburgh has still 15,000 gas lamps, which are mostly in side streets, but where roads have become more important through the introduction of bus routes, additional lamps and multiple burners have been fitted. Willowbrae Road, which carries the bulk of south-going traffic, is lit by four-mantle lamps, mounted at 13', and spaced at 20 yards apart. On one stetch of this roadway, lamps of the high pressure type are mounted at 25' and spaced at 40 yards apart. The installation, comprising seven lamps, is purely experimental, low pressure gas being used in conjunction with a fan and electric motor. 1937 Journal
Edinburgh A new system of ornamental street lighting by Decorative Lanterns and 400W Osira Lamps of a new type have recently been installed in George Street, Edinburgh. The steel columns, carry twin bracket arms with decorative scroll work. From these are suspended dustproof lanterns. The lanterns are constructed of heavy guage copper with ornamental dome-shaped top. Below this top is an octagonal shaped projecting body, carrying eight rectangular flashed white opal glass panels relieved with etching. On the underside of this projecting bodywork an iron ring carries a prismatic bowl refractor designed to produce the maximum of road brightness with minimum of glare. The units are installed at 25' and are spaced 150' apart. The improved Osira Lamps emit an almost white light. 1938 Journal
Edinburgh Concrete Utilities columns have been installed. 1938 Catalogue
Edinburgh From September 12th until April 10th, East Meadows playground is to be floodlit between dusk and 9PM. If the experiment is successful, other playgrounds in the city will be floodlit. The intention is to provide hundreds of school children with winter playing facilities. 1938 Journal
Edinburgh The mileage of lighted streets in Edinburgh is approximately 397 miles of which 256 miles are by gas lamps and 141 by electric lamps. The restricted lighting periods during the summer was this year reduced, for the first time for a number of years, from seven to five weeks, and operated from June 1st to July 5th inclusive. For all types of lamps the lighting hours are: all-night lamps, 4008 hours; part-night lamps, 1750 hours. Certain lamps on safety islands are turned on by the police when they consider this to be necessary in the event of dull or foggy weather. Further installations of mercury vapour lamps have been made in Lanark Road, Calder Road, Longstone Road and Queensferry Road, amounting in all to 81 lamps. Progress continues to be made in the direction of additional installation for automatically controlling sections of street lamps and stairlights, five of these having been brought into service during the year. There are at present 15 of these operated from various electricity substations. 1939 Journal
Edinburgh Three years ago, the Edinburgh Town Council spent £36,000 for a general improvement in the lighting of the main streets in the city. This scheme is almost complete. Tram routes have been responsible for a large proportion of this sum, the lighting of which originally consisted of brackets clamped to tram poles carrying lanterns of cast-iron construction with totally enclosed asymmetric refractor bowls; housing 300W lamps. The installation was staggered, the spacing being 80 yards, the mounting height 24', and the lighting was patchy and inclinded to cause glare. The city's bus routes have been improved and cast iron or steel pillars giving a mounting height of 25' have been installed. Mercury vapour lighting continues to be extended, particularly on main roads leading to the city, and there are 340 250W and 74 400W lamps extending over ten miles. In addition, the installation of 14 400W fluorescent lamps in George Street, a shopping centre, has been very satisfactory. The centralised control of electric lamps, inaugurated in 1935 now covers 18 sub-station areas, where new housing developments are in progress. The improvement to the tram routes was effected by reducing the spacing to 40 yards, increasing the wattage of the lamps to 500W and using copper lanterns with dome refractors giving more light below the lamps. The beams from the refractors have been raised to give a maximum intensity of 85° from the vertical, thus ensuring a high degree of road brightness. Approximately 40 miles of tram routes have been improved. 1939 Journal
Edinburgh Street lighting was entirely suspended since the outbreak of hostilities, resumed in September, after a trial demonstration after the permitted illumination had been approved by the Streets and Buildings Committee. There was no central control so it used the 0.02 f.c. standard with 25' columns and 15W lamps screened above the horizontal. Considerable shading of the gas lamps and low-mounted electric lamps was necessary to get the correct results. The present installation is confined to 25' pillars covering all tram routes and about 75% of bus routes and, where there are gas lamps, attention is being centred on bus routes and dangerous corners. When the installation is completed there will be 3500 electric lamps and 3000 gas lamps in operation and of these 2134 electric and 361 gas lamps are now functioning. The public have warmly welcomed the resumption of lighting. 1944 Journal
Egham Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Egham The Council has informed the Electricity Company that while public lighting continues to be restricted, the Council is not liable under existing agreements. Without prejudice to its position, it has offered to meet representatives of the company to discuss the matter. The company, also without prejudice, has offered to aintain the lamps at the following minimum prices: Mercury electric dicharge, £6 1s. per lamp per annum; tungsten filament 15s. per lamp. 1940 Journal
Ellesmere The Ellesmere Port Urban District Council have approved a 10-year agreement for gas lighting in Ellesmere. About 550 lamps are covered by tthe new contract. 1939 Journal
Ellesmere Port A 10-year contract for gas lgihting has recently been concluded by the Ellesmere Port Urban District Council. The 550 lamps vary for 2-6 mantles. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Enfield Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed.

1938 Catalogue
Epsom The Borough Council have decided to light the main road from North Cheam to Leatherhead boundary by sodium discharge lamps at a cost of £6,200. The scheme will include a section of the Ewell by-pass road which is at present unlighted. 1939 Journal
Epsom Ruxley Lane lit by Holophane Lineal lanterns mounted on Concrete Utilities Avenue columns with lattice brackets. Specified by Norman Auty A.M.Inst.C.E., the Borough Engineer. 1939 Advert
Erith Lower Road has Class D lighting with 500-watt OSRAM lamps in large "Oxford" lanterns mounted on existing tramway poles. 1937 Catalogue
Eston, Yorkshire. ELECO Arterial lantern. 1936 Advert
Failsworth A recent meeting of the Council confirmed a previous resolution to the effect that at the expiration of the contract with the Oldham Gas Department, electric lighting is to be substituted on Oldham Road. 1939 Journal
Falkirk ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Falkirk Main Street has been relit with 21 250W Osira type mercury vapour lanterns mounted on steel poles at 25' mounting height and staggered at 40 yard spacing. Rated mean test point on the carriageway measurements show that the installation is Class E to BSS 307. The whole scheme is hand controlled, lamps on one side of the roadway being switched off at midnight. 1937 Journal
Falkirk Of 44 miles of lighted streets in the town, 33 are lit by the Falkirk Gas Department. Gas lamps total 1,133 an the annual consumption of gas is in the region of 15,600,000 cubic feet. 1937 Journal
Falkirk Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
Falkirk Modernisation of main road lightign is being carried out. Existing 500W lamps at 90 yards spacing are being replaced by 250W mercury discharge lamps at 40-50 yards spacing. All main roads are being converted to mercury discharge lighting. 1938 Journal
Falkirk The first installation in Great Britain of Rythmatic Control has been placed in service in Falkirk, Scotland. It is designed to enable numerous public services to be controlled from a central point by means of push buttons. Up to 24 different switching operations are possible. Of primary importance is the control of street lamps. At Falkirk, some 400 lamps are controlled and can be switched "on" at dusk; "off" except for pilot lamps at midnight; and completley "off" at dawn. The equipment consists essentially of a control panel carrying the push buttons and a red indicator for each facility. Associated with the operating button is the injector equipment, which sends out audio frequencies as a train of timed impulses according to the signal code. The system uses four audio frequencies and six different impulse timings. The equipment is normally located in the power station. Mounted in the street lamps or other individual items to be controlled is a special relay which has two principle components: (1) A tuned circuit which responds to one of the four audio frequencies and (2) Two swinging armatures with natural periodicities corresponding respectivley to two of the six impulse timings, but which can only be fully deflected by repeated impulses at the correct periodicity. The relay is fitted with 15A contacts and operates at a very low voltage. Rythmatic Control operates over existing power networks and it does not matter whether the supply is AC or DC. The Falkirk installation was hatened into service so it could be used in connection with the important Eastern Scotland "black-out" which commenced an hour or two after the Rythmatic Control equipment was put into service. 1939 Journal
Falmouth Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Farnborough The South Suburban Gas Company have installed new gas lighting on the main Hastings Road. 1937 Journal
Farnborough Since 1940, all highways in Farnborough U.D. area, 36 miles, converted to "star-light" lighting. Since recent relaxation of restrictions, permission was granted by the Police Authorities for an increase in street lighting. The permission was received on the 3rd October 1944. By 15th October, the whole of the lighting in the area was converted to "dim out". 1944 Journal
Farnham Have signed a ten year contract with the local gas undertaking, subject to review after seven years. It covers 580 lamps. 1938 Journal
Farnham Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Farnhill Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Farnhill More gas lamps are to be used on Farnhill's public lighting system as a result of a 7-year contract in force. 1939 Journal
Featherstone (Yorks) Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Felling-On-Tyne The Felling-On-Tyne Urban District Council have accepted the offer of the Newcastle and Gateshead Gas Company to complete the lighting of South Shields Road at £256. 1937 Journal
Feltham The Feltham Urban District Council have recently approved a scheme for better lighting at Hayes and Harlington which is an extention of the improved lighting installed by the Gas Light And Coke Company. 1939 Journal
Feltham The main Staines-Feltham Road was lit by 2-mantle square gas lamps on short columns, spaced 300' apart. When the local authority entered into a new 15-year agreement for street lighting by gas in November 1937, improvements covering approximately 400 tall column lamps were made. The lamps are 6-mantle suspension lamps with Holophane band and dish prismatic refractors and are played 140' apart. 1939 Journal
Fife A three-year agreement for gas lighting has been entered into by the Thorpe St. Andrews Parish Council; while the Fife County Council has agreed upon a five-year contract for the lighting of Lumphinnans, gas being used. 1938 Journal
Finchley Tests are being carried out with sodium and mercury electric discharge lighting in order to ascertain which may be considered the most suitable for main road lighting. 1938 Journal
Finchley At a recent meeting of the Finchley Council considerable time was occupied in a discussion of the recommendation of the Highways Committee to install mercury discharge lighting on the Great North Road, and on the High Road. Argument centred mainly on the colour of the light to be provided, and was finally decided in favour of mercury becuase of the possibility of colour correction in the future. 1938 Journal
Finchley 250W horizontal type mercury lamps are to be installed for the lighting of Finchley High Road and Great North Road. 1938 Journal
Finchley Has installed Concrete Utilities columns and brackets. 1938 Catalogue
Finchley BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Finsbury Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Finsbury 400 war-time street lighting fittings are being provided on main roads in the borough. Well over 200 have already been installed, the total cost of the scheme being estimated at £480. 1940 Journal
Finsbury Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Fleetwood The Council is to apply for a loan of £12,500 for street lighting improvements. Additional lighting would be by electricity. 1938 Journal
Fleetwood 200 fittings are being provided on traffic routes, and the number will be increased next winter if the Council is satisfied with the results of the first section installed. 1940 Journal
Folkestone Arc lamps by Johnson And Phillips were installed along the Leas by Thos. G. Bransford betweem 1894 - 1900. "I was sent to adapt lamps supplied to the conditions prevailing. The Chief Electrical Engineer, Mr. Hesketh, was keen on a successful installation. 'The whole of the lighting was to run ten successive nights without a failure before I could expect to return home.' After nine successful nights I had great hopes of getting away - on the tenth night, in a blinding snowstorm, one lamp failed. I received the worst electric shock in my experience! Soaked to the skin I climbed the columnn on the Leas and put matters right. I went home - that failure was, very fortunately, observed by myself alone.' 1938 Journal
Folkestone The original BTH Merca "H" Lantern is installed along Dover Road and Cheriton Road. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Journal
Folkestone Hosts the 1937 APLE Conference where some streets are lit by trial installations. This includes a road lit with a new experimental cut-off gas lamp by Sugg which became known as the Folkestone. 1937 Conference
1941 Journal
Folkestone Have installed the new BTH Mercra H lantern in 1937. 1937 Advert
Folkestone Electric discharge lamps are to be provided in a number of roads at Folkestone. 1938 Journal
Folkestone BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Fordingbridge The street lighting contract has been renewed for a further three years, and improvements will be made to the equipment, which at present consists of 74 filament lamps. 1939 Journal
Framlingham Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Framlingham The Framlingham Parish Council, under a recent agreement, increased the term of its street lighting contract for one year to five years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Frimley and Camberley About 248 gas lamps lamps are affected bt a recent 7-year street lighting contract agreemetn for the urban district of Frimley and Camberley. 1937 Journal
Fraserburgh The Town Council has decided to await the decision of the Convention of Burghs in regard to street lightign before taking action on its own behalf. An account for £224 has been rendered by the Electricity Supply Company for the last four months of 1939, although no electricity was used in that period. The town clerk stated that some local authority would probably have to fight a test case, in whcih event he thought that other authorities with similar agreemetns would be willing to help. 1940 Journal
Frodsham (Lancs) New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Fulham, London When decision to re-light the main road made, the Borough Council decided to conduct a series of experiments and various systems of lighting were installed on a main through road. Results were judged on visibility, and experiments were carried out with the definite object of finding out which type of illuminant and fitting provided the highest and most uniform brightness of road surfce with the minimum of glare. Test installation in Harewood Road by the GEC selected (includes photograph.) The whole of the main roads were planned around the new principle of high and uniform road brightness against which vehicles and pedestrians would stand out sharply. Each fitting lights its own area of road. Consequently the spacing of the poles is not regular, and although the basic layout assumes the use of a staggered formation of poles 50 yards apart, this spacing is considerably reduced on bends, and in many cases several adjacent fittings are placed on the same side of the road. Generally the layout follows the recommendations in the MOT's Interim Report but the standard of illumination provided is at least three times the value laid down in this report for the lighting of main traffic routes, and the installation is claimed to be one of the finest of its type in the world. Illumination made possible by use of the Osira mercury vapour discharge lamp housed in a special version of the GEC's Di-fractor lantern. In all roads a novel design in concrete post has been used. This was selected on account of its great mechanical strength and low maintenance costs together with its very pleasing appearance. 400W Osira lamps used with the concrete standards and one road used 250W owing to the closer spacing of the trolley bus poles which have been used for mounting brackets. 310 400W lamps and 150 250W lamps were installed. Borough Electrical Engineer was W. C. Parker. Inaugurated in February 1937. Concrete columns were sold by the GEC but the columns and brackets were made by Concrete Utilities and featured in adverts. By 1937, 452 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
1937 Advert
1937 Advert
1937 Catalogue
Fulham The borough is almost only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Fulham A comprehensive scheme of war-time street lighting is being applied to the borough. 1940 Journal
Gainsborough As a result of experiments carried out by installing a trial installation of street lighting the Council has now decided to use electricity on the main roads through the town. 1938 Journal
Gainsborough Electricity is replacing gas throughout the main street of Gainsborough. The scheme will consist of 124 100W sodium discharge lamps at a mounting height of 25'. Spacing will vary from 108' to 138'. The scheme complies as fas as possible with the recommendations of the Final Report for Group A lighting. It has been necessary in places to adopt single side lighting and longer bracket arms in these sections are being used. 1939 Journal
Galashiels A ten-year contract for up-to-date lighting by gas has been signed. 600 lamps were in commission at the outbreak of the war. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Galston The installation was specified by The United Kingdom Gas Corporation for the local gas undertaking. Late in 1937, efforts were made to retain the street lighting. Demonstration lamps were erected as follows: four 12-light No.2 London lamps at 25'; 4-light No. 2 Sugg 8000 lamps at 15'; and four existing columns were respaced, mounting height increased to 13'9", and fitted with 3-light No. 1 burners in line. The Galston Town Council has accepted all the demonstration lamps and ordered twelve more 12-light lamps and five more 3-light No. 2 lamps. London lamps were used in the final installation and erected according to the MOT Report. Representatives from gas undertakings, county councils and burgh councils have inspected the lamps and expressed amazement at the good results obtained by the 12-light lamps. The local authority was so impressed with the results that it is now giving serious consideration to the utilisation of gas for bye-road lighting. 1938 Journal
1938 Paper
Galton The Burgh of Galton have entered into a 10-year agreement for public lighting by gas after seeing a demonstration of modern lamps. The lighting of the town has already been greatly improved. 1939 Journal
Galston, Ayrshire The main streets are to be lighted by 20 mercury discharge lamps at a cost of £492. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Garforth The Garforth Urban District Council has entered into a ten-year agreement for an extension of the street lighting system by gas. 1939 Journal
Garforth Garforth Urban District Council entered into a ten-year agreement for the lighting of Kippax and Allerton Bywater. The contract specified a number of improvements in the existing lighting units, the number of lamps involved being 312. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Gateshead Kingsway North and South roads in the Team Valley Trading Estate, Gateshead, lit by 360 Metropolitan Vickers Kingsway lanterns burning 400W Metrovick mercury vapour lamps. Referred to by Sir Cyril Hurcomb (Chairman Of The Electricity Commission) as the "most modern in England." 1938 Advert
Gateshead The Corporation has instructed the North-Eastern Electric Supply Co. Ltd. to provide 34 150W sodium discharge lamps on Saltwell Road from Bensham Bank to South Dene Towers, a section of road not previously lighted by electricity. The installation is to be extended at a later date when a further section of the road is to be reconstructed. Electric street lighting is also provided on Gatehead's new housing estates. 1939 Journal
Gellygaer ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Gellygaer A number of roads in the area of the Urban District are being lighted. 1940 Journal
Girvan The new £1,400 electric lighting scheme was officially inaugurated during the later part of March. Main thoroughfares are lighted by mercury discharge lamps. 1938 Journal
Glasgow An Act To Regulate The Police And Statute Labour Of The City Of Glasgow And For Other Purposes, 23rd July, 1866 presents rules for the creation of an Inspector of Lighting, who can appoint officers and employees, for creation and maintenance of public lighting by gas within the city. This also includes common stairs and landings; and also clock faces. 1939 Paper
1945 Paper
Glasgow The Glasgow Corporation Order Confirmation Act, 1914 modifies and updates the 1866 act with clarification of stair lighting rules. Also a selection of illuminants are permitted including gas and electricity. 1939 Paper
Glasgow Description and history of lighting department 1934 Paper
Glasgow Of the 1400 new street lighting points were erected in 1936-1937, more than a third were fitted with 200W filament lamps, 300W, 150W and 500W following. Only a few 60W and 100W lamps were erected, mostly in lanes. Three sodium lamps lmaps were placed in a lane to replace three 60W filament lamps. As of 1937, there were 5858 100W lamps, 2684 150W lamps, 2022 200W lamps, 5439 300W lamps and 1782 500W lamps. The most important improvements were of Clarkson Road, Cumernauld Road and Springburn Road; these were extensions on tramway standards staggered at 120' spacing and giving a mounting height of 27'6". Side streets were also converted from low-mounted gas lamps and connected to the main road for switching. Each span carried two open reflectors, each of which housed a 150W lamp. The last section of the old flame-arc installation north of the Clyde was removed and 500W filament lamps were erected at higher mounting and closer spacing. There were still 103 arcs in the city. The improvement of retained gas lighting continued by substitution of 3- and 4-mantle for single-mantle burners. As of 1937, there were 3228 3-light and 4612 4-light lamps. There was a steady extension of the distant control of electric street and stair lamps by relay contactors. In two divisions, all the electric street lamps were being lit and extinguished from the division station. 1937 Journal
Glasgow Lighting has been improved for the approaches to The Empire Exhibition of 1938. The main approach Paisley Road was given "big lamps" some years ago: this strech saw 500W and 1000W GLS replacing flame-arcs, and the existing 300W lamps in other portions of the road were replaced with 500W. In other roads around the three sides of the Exhibition, short pillars with 4-mantle gas lamps and 100W GLS lamps were replaced with 300W and 500W lamps mounted at 25'. In all these schemes the spacing is 120' or less and the diffusing envelopes have been used to soften the sources. Along another route to the Exhibition, there had been lamps of a modest power and low height. Now there are 150W sodium lamps with refractor plates, mounted at 25', spaced at 120', staggered in the straighter stretches and set on the outer sides of the bends. Tramways and lighting standards have been made shining guides, by day and by night, along the main way to the City centre to the Exhibition, by new uniforms of silver and royal blue. 1938 Journal
Glasgow Glasgow Corporation gas department have installed improved lighting at a busy traffic roundabout with sixteen new 18-foot lamp standards carrying 6-light gas lamps. 1939 Journal
Glasgow Description and history of lighting department 1939 Paper
Glasgow A plan of the City's lighting was submitted: within the City there were 20,000 lights which could be lit in four seconds and could be extinguished in the same time. Glasgow was of the opinion that there should be a modified system of lighting in the public streets. The Corporation was ready to fit up a main street in Glasgow to prove to the Home Office that something could be done. The biggest part of the population of Glasgow lived in tenements, and the people had almost rebelled to secure the lighting of the stair-heads. Out of 95,000 stair-heads, 63,000 had been lit. 1940 Journal
Glasgow Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Glasgow A considerable mileage of war-time street lighting is already in commission. 1940 Journal
Glasgow Street lighting during fog. The corporation has been informed by the Ministry of Home Security that while there would be no objection to the use of ordinary street lighting in the case of fog in the day time, such lighting at night during fog could not be permitted. Rapid and steady progress is beign made with the installation of lighting on all roads in the area. 1940 Journal
Glasgow Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Glasgow Have developed a method of converting old square panel gas lanterns (of the Windsor pattern) into ARP Signs. This involves fitting a swan-neck mantle, enclosing it with a slotted cylinder, which allows limited illumination of a pane with information. 1941 Journal
Glasgow The first modified lighting fittings were installed in the principle streets of Glasgow in February 1940. Today there are 28,700 lamps lit. Of this 10,700 are gas and the remaining 18,000 are electric. It was unfortunate that it took the war to provide an opportunity to overhaul every street lantern in the city. For gas fittings, the modified fitting is housed in the standard gas lantern, and work to convert was comparatively simple as most were pre-war 3-mantle or 4-mantle roof-type burners. The gas supply was led by a 3/8" o/d copper tube on the line of the estragal. For ease of maintenance the copper tube has a brass union fitted where the tube bent from the perpendicular. On the lower section of the tube the pressure governon was fitted. To fit the modified unit it was only necessary to uncouple the bottom section of the tube, the upper section being quite clear of the position of the A.R.P. fitting. No governor was found necessary. For electric fittings, the modified electric fittings were of three types: (1) this was for 19' mounting height and was fitted easily in the Glasgow standard lantern. The globe ring of the lantern provided a convenient seating for the disc of the fitting and a Goliath Screw adaptor with connecting flex to a B.C. holder made the quickest of all change-overs: (2) for mountings over 15' and under 19' had the St. Mungo Reflector fitting for a housing. The Edison Screw adaptor screwed into the existing lampholder, but it was found necessary to have some form of anchorage, as wind action tended to unscrew the fitting; (3) for fitting to swan-neck bracket which Glasgow has many thousands. The fitting was pre-war, set at an angle to the vertical, and to rectify this entailed a little more difficulty in fitting than was foudn in the other two types. 1941 Journal
Glasgow A total of 17,500 electric ARP street lighting fittings of all types have been installed. They are to found in all areas, embracing industrial, commerical and residential districts. 1942 Journal
Glasgow There are 90,000 lamps in stairs and 28,000 lamps in streets which have been converted to A.R.P. lighting. In addition 4,000 lamps in stairs and 7,000 in streets have not been lit since before the war. 12 miles of new streets with occupied houses where no poles have yet been erected will require new installations after the war. Also 870 cast-iron pillars have been knocked down and 31 steel poles have been damaged by vehicles since the war began. 1943 Journal
Glasgow The policy is essentially to provide high mounting. It was by reason of this and of the accompanying overhead wiring and central control that Glasgow was allowed the full relaxation to 0.2 f.c. at 17th September 1944 for some 18,000 lamps. 1945 Paper
Glasgow Back in the late 1880s there was practically nothing but old gas flat flame burners. There were very few of the old type of electric arc lamps that were tried in the last century, such as the Jablochkoff candle, which was a most elaborate mechanism and not a highly efficient illumination engine. The flat flame burner passed through various improvements until the Welsbach gas mantle and then the tungsten filament lamp. Since then, there had been enormous developments in lamps and fittings. 1945 Journal
Glasgow Description and history of lighting department 1945 Paper
Glastonbury Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Glossop Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Gloucester Following on from an experimental installation in Estcourt Road, sodium lighting has been adopted as a general policy for trunk and by-pass roads in the locailty. Up to two miles have been installed. In Barnwood Road, poles are mounted in the centre of refuges with double arms and carry two 150W lamps mounted at 21'6" over the centre of the carriageway. (Includes night picture). 1937 Journal
Gloucester The recent 10 year gas lighting contract will affect certain main roads in the suburban areas of the city. It is intended to improve the lighting to a point where illumination is provided to allow motorists to drive in safety up to 30MPH without headlights. 4 light gas lamps with directional reflectors of the latest type will be installed at 15' height in a staggered formation with a spacing of not more than 50 yards. The number of lamps (164) may be considerably increased since the Hucclecote Parish Council approved the extension of the area of lighting. 1937 Journal
Gloucester Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Gloucester The Gloucester Corporation has entered into a ten year contract with the Gloucester Gas Light Company for the lighting of several miles of roads in the City. After tests, it was proposed to use gas fittings. It is hoped that the work will not be long delayed. There will be over 500 gas lamps of a modern type, installed with regard to the Ministry Of Transport's Committee's recommendation for the lighting of Group 'B' roads. The roads to be re-lighted has been divided into two classes. Both will be lighted by 4-mantle lamps, but those lamps to be installed in Class 2 roads are provided with larger mantles to give a greater lumen output than is needed for Class 1. A mounting height of 15' will be achieved by utilising the existing 9½' columns, suitably resited, with 5½' extensions. Automatic controls, including hand extingushing control for ARP, are provided. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Goring-On-Thames A three year aggremetn for gas lighting has been arranged for Goring-On-Thames. When necessary, the candle power of existing lamps is to be increased. 1939 Journal
Gosport The Borough Council have decided that electric street lighting shall be used in the town for the next 15 years and have accepted the tender of the Portsmouth Electricy Department. The annual cost will amount to £7,272. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Grantham Granham Town Council has issued instructions to install 211 gas "starlight" units in the local streets, in addition to the 25 directional lamps that have been in use since the war.. 1940 Journal
Grantham Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Gravesend, Rochester Road The road surface, which has been designed by the road engineer from considerations of wear and non-skid properties, is the background which the Lighting Engineer has to illuminate. It frequently happens that the more "non-skid" the surfaces are, the greater the difficulty to illuminate the surface uniformly. The designs of corners and cross roads together with their backgrounds, the correct positioning of the units and their mounting heights, the reflective properties of the buildings flanking the street and the design of the lanterns and lamps loom large in this complex problem. The road to be lit is the westernmost section of Rochester Road: it has a length of 3000', a carriageway width of 40', an overall width of 100' with a 25' building line. The road has five "T" junctions, a "staggered" crossing and a curve compounded of two radii 295' and 410' respectively. Except for 800' on the western side, the road is flanked by houses and has a group of shops in the central portion; it is heavily used both by vehicles and pedestrians. The road was previously lighted by 75W GLS lamps in directional fittings all situated on the southern side of the road and spaced 190' feet apart with 12'6" mounting height. In view of the unsatisfactory nature of the original lighting and the prevalence of accidents on this road, the Council took the matter of efficent lighting in January 1938. They decided on BTH Mercra H" lanterns equipped with horizontally burning Mercra electric discharge lamps. The installation comprises 23 units mounted on steel columns in staggered formation, except on the bend, and are provided with bracket arms giving a distance of 30' between the two rows of lanterns. The lanterns are mounted 25' from the road surface and at 150' intervals except on the bend where the spacing has been reduced by consideration of the angular separation between the units. The chokes, condensers and fuses are fitted in the bases of the columns and are readily accessible. The design and planning of the installation was carried out by the Borough Engineer and his staff, and the equipment was provided by BTH. 1938 Journal
Gravesend BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Gravesend CU Avenue 4D Columns with Arc 1 Brackets have been installed.

1939 Advert
Grayshott Improvements are to be carried out in the lighting of Grayshott, Hants, as the result of a three-year contract for gas lighting by the Parish Council. 1939 Journal
Great Cornard (Suffolk) Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Great Yarmouth Automatic control of street lighting, to be applied to 250 lamps, has been sanctioned by the Electricity Committee at a cost of £200. If the trial is successful the Town Council will be asked to consider the introduction of a complete scheme of street lightign control for the whole town. 1939 Journal
Greenock A new contract into low pressure gas lighting has been entered into by Greenock Corporation. This is for public lighting on the Strone Farm Housing Estate for which 77 lamps are to be provided. 1936 Journal
Greenock Pressure-wave controllers light and extinguish 1,686 gas lamps, the remaining 241 have clocks. All electric lamps have time switches. There is a mixture of all-night and half-night lighting. Portions of the central area of the town and one main thoroughfare are to be lighted by electric discharge lamps. The British Standards Specification (BS 307:1931) is used for new installations or improvements. 1937 Journal
Greenock Improvements are being carried out where the Parish Council have entered into an agreement for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Greenock At a cost of £1155, Nelson Street is to be relighted by electricity; 48 sodium discharge lamps will be used. 1939 Journal
Greenock The transformers and condensers of sodium lamps which had been left in the streets were going to be taken into stores for protection. In most cases, the trouble was that the condensers had broken down. The transformers would be stoved to dry out the coils. 1943 Journal
Greenwich Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Greenwich There are 253 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 77 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Greenwich GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
Greenwich An excellent installation of high pressure gas lighting has now been completed in some Greenwhich roads crossing Blackheath. The lamps used Supervia mantles invented by the South Metropolitan Gas Company and which by reason of their shape are particularly suitable for street lighting. These mantles, which are rectangular in shape, develop a candle power in the direction along the road two and a half tiems as great as that emitted from a cylindrical mantle with the same gas consumption. The installation being on roads near Greenwich Observatory was specially devised by the company to meet the wishes of the Astronomer Royal that there should be no illumination above the horizontal at 25' above the road level. Lamps are spaced at intervals of 150' apart and overhang the roadway 6'. 1937 Journal
Grimsby During 1937, 79 lamps were put into use in new streets, 157 additional lamps were erected, 193 steel standards substituted for cast iron, 449 modern fittings substituted for cast iron and vitreous enamelled reflectors and 37 gas lamps were replaced by electric. The 2557 lamps include 181 500W, 232 300W, 110 200W, 13 150W, 2017 100W and 4 60W. There are 397 units controlled by clock switches, and 1232 units on fifth core controlled by contactors operated by clock switches. Lamps were alight from dusk to dawn throughout this year. Outside the borough there are 63 60W and 4 100W lamps in use in the village of Immingham, and 17 60W and 1 100W lamp in use in the village of Laceby. 1937 Journal
Grimsby It has been reported to the Grimsby Corporation Electricity Committee that a system of centralised control of street lighting was being devised by which it was hoped to be possible to switch all public lamps on and off from the power station. 1939 Journal
Guernsey The use of gas for street lighting has been decided on by the Parish Councils of St. Peter Port, St. Sampson, Vale and St. Andrew for the following year. The States of Guernsey have also renewed the gas lighting contract cover the harbours. 1939 Journal
Guildford A new installation of 12 250W mercury discharge lamps is now in commission on the Woodbridge Road where dual carriageways are under construction. The lighting equipment is erected on concrete standards and road users have been impressed with the visibility. The Council proposed to install similar lighting along London Road from Burpham towards the town, which will use 400W lamps. 1938 Journal
Guildford Guildford is likely to have its street lighting improved. The Highways Committee are to review the lighting of all the roads and are considering the illumination of three main streets in the centre of the town in a manner similar to the lighting of the Woodbridge Road dual carriageway. In view of the inadequate lighting now existing, the borough electrical engineer has been instructed to prepare and submit a scheme for lighting certain roads in accordance with the Departmental COmmittee's Report on street Lighting for Main Traffic Routes, similar to the lighting recently installed in the new section of Woodbridge Road. 1939 Journal
Gunnislake, Cornwall At the Parish Council tenders of the East Cornwall Electricity Company and the Gunnislake Gas Company were considered. The Electricity Company's tender included additional lights and an extension of the lighting period until the end of May. It was decided to adopt electric street lighting. 1938 Journal
Hackney Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Hackney By 1937, 750 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1937 Advert
Hackney The Metropolitan Borough of Hackney is the first to install Osira luminescent lamps (MAF). Immediately these new lamps became available on 1st December 1937, an order was placed with the GEC for 36 400W lamps for the lighting of Rectory Road, Hackney and Stoke Newington Common. These are in process of immediate errection under the direction of Mr. Percival Holt. They are housed in GEC Difractor Lanterns at 150' spaceing and a mounting height of 25' and are arranged in staggered formation at teh same time complying with the MOT requirements as to the lighting of curves and bends. 1937 Journal
Hackney The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Hackney It is estimated that the cost of providing war-time street lighting throughout the borough will be some £4,000. Experiments are being made on certain roads in the meantime. 1940 Journal
Hadleigh The Urban District Council has entered into a five-year agreement to light Hadleigh by gas. The number of lamps is to be extended. 1938 Journal
Hailsham, Sussex 120 electric street lamps are to be provided at Willingdon according to a recommendation approved by the Hailsham Rural District Council. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Halifax ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Halifax On November 30th Alderman R. Strik. J.P., Chairman of the Corporation Lighting Committee, formally switched on a new installation of 250W electric discharge lamps in Keighley Road. The lamps are placed at 120' and are 25' high, replacing a gas lighting system. The light output is 450,000 lumens agains 82,000 lumens before electricity and the annual running cost is £294 compared with £173 previously. Alderman Mrs Lightowler asserted "that a well-lighted road not only inspired confidence but kept the district decent." Over 50 miles of streets will be lit by electric lighting in 1937. 1936 Journal
1937 Advert
Halifax Number of gas lamps increased by 563 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Halifax The town decided to have a permanent record of the Coronation by improving the lighting in King's Cross Lane by the addition of 34 400W Mercury Discharge lamps. 1937 Journal
Halifax An addition 31 mercury discharge lamps have appeared on important Halifax streets during the past 12 months. The Corporation is careful to ensure that residential streets and housing scheme lighting is also improved from time to time in keeping with the important traffic thoroughfares. During the 12 months 160 100W, 32 150W and 15 200W lamps have also been installed in various parts of the town. 1939 Journal
Halifax Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Halifax Not having central control, the town was concerned with the lower standard of the maximum of 0.02 f.c. on the ground. On receipt of Home Security Circular No 108 1944, on the 9th September, Halifax immediately started to improve the lighting: (a) In the case of suspension lamps - gas and electric - the masks were removed from the Starlight fittings; (b) in the case of square gas lanterns, the removal of the lower masked portion of the Starlight fittings and treatign the lower panes of the lantern with a light art-blue wash up to a level which would give an unscreened source of light between the angles of 15° below the horizontal and 45° below the horizontal. The work was completed on existing Starlighting and by Sunday, 17th September, 1250 gas lamps and 350 electric lamps were converted. The public reaction to this was the lights from the square lanterns were very pleasing, but the light from the suspension lamps did not appear (from the public's point of view) to be giving more light. The Department then improved the suspension lamps by removing the Starlight fitting entirely and: (a) to gas suspension lamps the globe was blacked down to the level of the bottom of the mantle - dummy nozzles being fitted in the leaving one No. 2 mantle for the source of light; (b) in the case of electric lamps, the Department making up E.S. and B.C. adaptors, and a metal mask to prevent light above the horizontal, and a 15W lamp was fitted. When the globes were clear, the whole of the globe was treated with a light art-blue wash and where the globe was semi-opaque no further action was taken. The effect was pleasing. The Committee then gave instructions for the whole of the Borough to be lighted to the new standard where labour and material were available. Up to 3000 lamps have been lighted to the standard. The public reaction is that the work is not proceeding fast enough. The whole work has to be done with reduced staff. Driving at night in comfort at 20 miles per hour without headlights is possible but in the case of gas lighting in square lanterns, that discomfort glare from the unscreened source of light was experienced, so a light tint was carried up to the line of the black so that the whole of the lantern was semi-opaque and there was no unscreened source of light. 1944 Journal
Hamilton Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Hamilton Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads through the town. 1940 Journal
Hamilton Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Hamilton The Town Council has approved the recommendations of its Street Lighting Committee to extend street lighting in the town by teh installation of 150 emergency fittings of lamps at cross roads. At present 293 gas lamps, chiefly on main roads and omnibus routes, have been converted. 1941 Journal
Hammersmith, London 76 400W mercury vapour lamps have been installed in Goldhawk Road and Shepherd's Bush Green. The lamps are spaced at 120' and the mounting height is 25'. The installation is 1.6 miles long. 1936 Journal
Hammersmith, London Westway, the centre of the recent speed limit controversy, will now have Mercury Discharge lighting. Standards will be 125' apart with a mounting height of 25'. The scheme will cost £1204. 1937 Journal
Hammersmith, London The lightign of the main thoroughfares of the borough, following the successful initial installation of mercury discharge lamps in Goldhawk Road and Westway, is to be carried out on similar lines. The new installation has just been commenced and will eventually consist of some 550 units utilising 400W lamps in the most important roads and 250W in some of the secondary roads. The scheme is based on the recommendations of the MOT Final Report, and will cover 8 to 10 miles of road, so that when complete there will be a continuous stretch of mercury discharge lighting to Putney Bridge, past Hammersmith Broadway and beyond Westway as far as Harrow Road. Street refuges on the Shepherd's Bush Road are being provided with 125W discharge lamps in opal bowls at a mounting height of 16" in accordance with the MOT recommendations. 1939 Journal
Hammersmith The borough is almost only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Hampstead Bromford Tube columns are being installed in the district. Different types of roots were photographed. 1939 Journal
Hampstead The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Hampstead There are more than 100 units incorporating 750W Osram Tungsten lamps in large GEC Oxford lanterns. The wattage of the lamp is 50% greater than normally employed but the increased efficiency is justified by the importance of the road concerned. The columns are steel and are of the "shepherd's crook" type, the bracket projecting about 6'. The contract was carried out to the requirements of the Hampstead Borough Electrical Engineer and Manager, Mr. H. Brierley, A.M.I.E.E. 1939 Journal
1941 Journal
Harlow New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Harlow Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Harrow Several of the main streets of Harrow relit by gas using the Sugg London lamp. The installation is particuarly noteworthy in view of the fact that the lamps were adopted after most searching tests. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Harrow Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Hartlepool The Gas and Water Company have remodelled the lighting on the London and North-Eastern Railway's Fish Quay at Hartlepool. The new lighting consists of 19 six-light and 9 four-light suspension gas lamps. 1937 Journal
Harwich Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Harwich, Upper Dovercourt Harwich Vigilance Committee appealed for improved lighting but the Electrical Engineer replied that it was a matter over which the Council had absolute control. A serious accident had occurred there and it was blamed on bad lighting; and the Minister of Transport had also stated that a number of accidents was due to poor lighting. The Committee were writign to the Town Council again. 1936 Journal
Haslemere A 10-year contract for gas lighting has recently been entered into by the Urban District Council. A number of electric lamps are being displaced by gas under this agreement. 1938 Journal
Hawick The Harwick Town Council has entered into a ten-year contract for the public lighting on the Greenheads Housing Estate. The illuminant used is gas. 1938 Journal
Hawick The Town Council has asked the electricity and gas companies to provide quotations for installing the new lighting in their respective areas. 1940 Journal
Hatfield Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Hatfield Councillor W. Clarke, J.P., chairman of the Hatfield R.D.C., has expressed his approval of the system of gas lighting recently installed. The Council inspected installations all over Hertfordshire and in parts of Middlesex before deciding on the illuminant to be used. 1937 Journal
Havant A five year contract for gas lighting affects some 700 lamps in the Havant and Waterloo districts. On main roads, 10- and 6-light suspension lamps, with a mounting height of 18-20', will bring the lighting into conformity with Classes D, E and F of the British Standard Specificaiton. 1937 Journal
Hawick Gas street lighting has been installed on a new housing estate erected by the Hawick Town Council. 1939 Journal
Hawkhurst By a recent decision of the Parish Council, Hawkhurst street lighting is to be all electric. By the new contract, the price per lamp will be reduced from £3 1s 0d per annum to £2 16s 0d. Under the new agreement the mounting height of 44 of the existing lamps will be increased to 18' and new reflectors will be fitted. The total number of lamps under the new scheme will be 67, all provided with 100W lamps. 1939 Journal
Hayes And Harlington 44 Concrete Utilities Avenue 4Ds installed along Bath Road, in a mile long section just west of Cranford Bridge to Harlington Corner. The road is a three-track road, de-restricted; the carriageway is 43'6" wide, bounded on each side by a kerb, grass verge and footway. In view of the importance of the Bath Road and the heavy traffic it carries, the Engineer and Surveyor, Mr. F. J. N. Polkinhorne, and the Highways Committee of the Hayes and Harlington Urban District Council, decided that sodium would be most economical. The concrete columns are equipped with ELECO Golden Ray refractor plate fittings and 150W Philora Philips sodium lamps, each controlled by a time switch. Average spacing is 132', mounting height 25' and bracket projection 5'. The installation is planned by ELECO in conjunction with Egham And Staines Electricity Co. Ltd. ELECO carried out the erection work. The lighting intenstiy is in excess of Class "D" at the B.S.S. test point. It is the first scheme planned to the MOT Final Report to be installed on the Bath Road. It gives results better than the figures laid down by the MOT. 1938 Advert
1938 Journal
1939 Journal
1941 Journal
Hayfield Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Hazel Grove Centralised remote control of street lighting has been approved by the Urban District Council. The Council have also decided to provide 125 additional street lamps in the Woodford area at a cost of £1,500. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Hebburn-On-Tyne For several years the lighting has been all-electric. Some weeks ago, the Council decided the town's lighting was in need of improvement and it was rather prematurely reported in certain quarters that the Council had decided to revert to gas. It can now be stated that this is not the case - the decision is still to be made. 1938 Journal
Hebburn-On-Tyne The Urban District Council has decided to enter into a ten years' street lighting agreement with the North-Eastern Electric Supply Co., Ltd. 1939 Journal
Hebburn-On-Tyne New schemes have been installed. Four miles of main roads and twenty miles of secondary roads are now lit by Osira lamps. 1939 Journal
Hebburn-On-Tyne The four miles of main roads and twenty miles of secondary roads lit by Osira lamps were inaugurated just before the war. A novel ceremony was held with councillors, officials and guests at the Royal Station Hotel, Newcastle, where a map of Hebburn showing the new lighting was lit with Osira black lamps (ultraviolet lamps) which showed up the streets on a map display in blue and orange. 1940 Journal
Hebden Bridge After careful consideration of tenders and the inspection of trial installations the Urban District Council has decided to install 30 100W sodium lamps in the main road at Hebden Bridge. The lighting season is to be 1800 hours per annum and the capital cost will be spread over 10 years. Class D lighting will be provided. 1936 Journal
Hebden Royd The Urban District Council is to install sodium lighting in the main road from West End to Whiteley Arches. 1938 Journal
Heckmondwike Mercury discharge street lighting on the main roads is to be extended at a cost of £2000. 1939 Journal
Hellifiend Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Helsby (Lancs) New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Hemel Hempstead Sodium discharge ligthing at 25' mounting height is to be provided in Marlowes and High Street. The existing standards displaced by the new scheme are to be erected in other positions. 1939 Journal
Hendon 359 units of WASK Up And Down Suspension Gear have been installed on gas lighting columns. 1933 Advert
Hendon Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. Installed WASK Up And Down Patent Lamp Suspenders. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Hendon The Gas Light And Coke Company report that 10 miles of arterial and main roads were lighted to a generous Class F. Some 360 6-light lamps with band and dish refractors were fixed on bracket arm columns giving a mounting height of 22' and the Company have guaranteed a test point illumination of 0.07 foot candle with maximum depreciation allowance of 20%. Clock controllers with solar compensating dials are used. 1937 Journal
Hendon About 2,250 gas lamps are coverd by the recent contract made by the Hendon Borough Council. Over 300 lamps have been replaced by more modern types and improvements in the lighting of the second-class roads are being considered. 1937 Journal
Hendon The Minister Of Transport has signified his preliminary approval of a scheme for the improvement of street lighting in Edgware Road, Hendon (London-Holyhead Road, A5). The section extends for half-a-mile and extends from Kingsbury Road to Sheveshill Avenue. The existing single carriage-way is to be converted into a double track road, and a greatly improved gas street lighting system is to be installed. The present lighting is by means of 20 six-mantle lamps mounted 22' above the roadway. All these lamps are to be removed and the columns and lamps converted and refixed in new positions. The modern gas lightign equipment to be provided will consists of 49 twelve-mantle lamps and mounted 25' above the roadway. The scheme has been prepared by Mr. A. O. Knight, M.C., M.Inst.C.E. the Hendon Borough Engineer and Surveyor, and the lamps will be installed and maintained by Gas Light And Coke Company under a 15-year contract. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Hendon In 1966, the GEC install the first UK installation of High Mast lighting using low pressure sodium lamplanterns at the Brent Cross Flyover, Hendon, London. They install 30 metre masts with lanterns housing 180W SOX lamps. Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Henley Has entered into a 7-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Henley Street lighting has averaged £802 14s. 8ds. per annum during the past three years. The Council has now decided to provide further electric lighting by the provision of 200W suspension type lamps in various streets bringing the annual cost to £853 per annnum. This will be reduced in 18 months to £704 when the existing installation has been paided for. 1938 Journal
Henley-In-Arden Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Hereford Hereford is now entirely lit by gas. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Hereford A ten year plan for the improvement of public lighting has been approved by the Town Council. It is estimated that the scheme will cost £6,000 or more. The town is entirely gas lit. 1937 Journal
Hereford Mr G. H. Davies, District and Lighting Superintendent, has carried forward a further portion of the ten-year plan, for the Hereford Corporation. This includes low-pressure high-powered suspension lamps and high-pressure gas lighting. One street has been lit with Sugg's new Folkestone lamp. Also there are 60 2-light square lanterns on 11' columns with clock controls on a new housing estate and 20 similar lamps on smaller estates. The increased mounting height brings problems of maintenance as the modern lamp requires much more skilled attention than the old square lantern. 1939 Journal
Hereford The centre of the City of Hereford is lit with high pressure gas lighting which can be controlled from the Gas works, making it possible to extinguish the lighting in the event of a lights warning. On Sunday, the main lights in the city were lighted to practically pre-war lighting standard, Class D of B.S.S. of Street Lighting, and all other streets had partial lighting. It was on from 8PM until midnight and at key points the lamps were alight until dawn. Both high and low pressure are clock controlled. The lamps had been brought into store early in the war and as occasion offered, they were overhauled and repaired in readiness. When the first intimation of possible lighting was received, we at once commenced fixing High Pressure and Low Pressure suspension lamps, and later all available fitters were fitting lanterns with conversion sets. It brought crowds of citizens out into the streets, including many young citizens who had not previous seen the streets lighted. 1944 Journal
Herne Bay The Urban District Council has extended its contract for gas lighting in the town until November 30th, 1940. 1938 Journal
Hertford 130 Concrete Utilities Concrete Lamp Columns are being installed in Herford. The Broadway design has been selected with a height of 25'6" from the ground level and with a 3'6" projection. The installation was carried out by the North Metropolitan Electric Supply Company to the specification of the Hertford Borough Surveyor. 1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Catalogue
Hertford By 1937, 113 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1937 Advert
Hereford The mounting heights are: Class D: 18', 20', 22'; other lighting: 11', 12', 15' and 18', with 135' spacing for Class D, and for other lighting 180' to 200'. There has just been completed a three months' trial of lighting junction lamps all night, but no decision has been made by the Lighting Committee in the matter. 1937 Journal
Heskin, Lancs The ratepayers have authorised the Parish Council to enter into an agreement with the Lancashire Electric Power Company for the provision of 27 electric street lamps, the total cost of which, including maintenance and renewals, amounts to 173s 5s per annum. Application is to be made for a loan redeemable over 10 years. 1939 Journal
Heston and Isleworth Street lighting in Staines Road between Barrack Road and the borough boundary is to be improved 27 lamp columns will be required and tenders have been invited. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
High Bentham A three-year contract for gas lighting of High Bentham has been entered into by the Parish Council. 1938 Journal
High Ongar New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
High Ongar Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
High Wycombe The Wycombe (Borough) Electric Light and Power Company Limited have recently installed 400W Osira electric discharge lamps housed in GEC Di-fractor lanterns for the lighting of Oxford Road. 1937 Journal
Hinckley Residents of Barwell resent the Council's decision to change their system of street lighting. They feel that their existing lighing is perfectly good. 1937 Journal
Hinckley Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Hinckley Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Hinckley Prior to the introduction of the Dim Out, no lighting whatever was enjoyed in Hinckley. Star Lighting had been installed throughout the district but not operated. Some 250 lamps were ready for the starting date. The policy adopted was to light all lamps at junctions and bends in roads so looking from one lamp, the next lamp in either direction could be seen. The results have been very helpful and the public pull of praise. Additional lamps are being lighted as and when the restricted labour available. 1944 Journal
Hitchin Lit by 150W sodium discharge lamps at 25' mounting height. 1943 Journal
Holbeach By a renewed contract with the Boston and District Electric Supply Company covering a peroid of 5 years, the wattage of lamps in the main streets is to be considerably increased and the company is to provide public lighting at Holbeach Hurn, Holbeach St. Marks, while a number of additional lamps are to be provided in the prviously lighted portion of the Council's area. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Holborn, London Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Holborn, London A street lighting installation of exceptional interest has been erected for Holborn Borough Council in Woburn Place, London, W.C., by The Gas Light And Coke Company. The installation was erected to the specification and plans of Mr. J. E. Parr, A.M.Inst.C.E., the Borough Engineer and Surveyor. The lamps are Keith Blackman Magnalux types which were first exhibited at the A.P.L.E. Conference at Folkestone in September 1937. The installation comprises seven four-mantle lamps on bracket arm columns giving 25' height to light source, while three double-arm columns each carrying two three-mantle lamps have been fixed on refuges. The columns were supplied by the Bromford Tube Co., Ltd. and the lamsp are carried on Keith Blackman raising and lowering gear. Ignition is by means of Horstmann Comet igniters. The lamps are spaced approximately 90' apart, the road width being 48'. The lamps are fixed on 8' bracket arms giving 6' outreach beyond the kerb and central sources are placed on the refuges. The output per 100' length of road exceeds 15,000 lumens and the test point illumination averages slighty below .5 foot candles, the installation falling in class "C" of the B.S.I. specification. 1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1939 Journal
Holborn, London The Woburn Place installation (see above) has now been extended around three sides of Russell Square. It was erected by The Gas Light And Coke Company to the order of Holborn Metropolitan Borough Council. It consists of twenty-five 4-mantle lamps approximately 75-80' apart on a road over 40' wide. The columns are the same type as those in Woburn Place and the minimum illumination is 0.4 foot candles. It is claimed that Russell Square is now the best lighted square in London, the luminous output being in excess of 15,000 lumens per 100 linear. 1939 Journal
Hornby All main roads in the area are being lighted. 1940 Journal
Hornchurch and Thurrock The Urban Councils of Hornchurch and Thurrock have each entered into a contract for public lighting by gas. under these agreements, clock controllers will be fitted to each lamp. 1937 Journal
Hornsea The GEC has received an order for 138 concrete columns, brackets and lighting units from the South-East Yorkshire Light And Power Company. 1939 Journal
Hornsea One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Hornsey Proposals for complete electrification of street lighting costing £40,000 cover 61 miles of streets not previously lighted by electricity. The principle roads will conform to the MOT's Interim Report and to the British Standards Specification Classes D and E. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Hornsey Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1938 Journal
Hornsey The Minister Of Health has sanctioned the Corporation's application to borrow £35,000 for street lighting improvements; which involves the complete electrification of all street lighting in the Borough. 1937 Journal
Hornsey The largest single order yet placed in Great Britain has been placed with ELECO to light 19 miles of roads with 697 Golden Ray fittings. Includes a picture of Muswell Hill Road. 1938 Journal
1938 Journal
Hornsey Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Hoston and Isleworth War-time street lighting is to be installed on all main roads and through district roads in the Borough. On the Great West Road and Great South-West Road, the modified lighting will be installed at road junctions. The decision to carry out this programme was made by the Council on the recommendation of the Works Committee. Estimaed cost for one year is £4,154. 1940 Journal
Houghton-le-Spring 520 lamps are covered by a renewal of the contract for gas lighting. 1937 Journal
Houghton-le-Spring About 500 gas lamps are involved by a renewal of the street lighting contract for Houghton-le-Spring. 1939 Journal
Houghton-le-String Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. 509 lamps are affected. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Houghton-le-Spring The Urban District Council has received an offer from the North-Eastern Electric Supply Co. Ltd. t o reduce the charge for street lighting from January 1st from 50%, the specified war-time proportion, to 25% on the normal charges for energy, subject to the Council agreeing on the continuation of the existing agreement with the company for a period after the normal resumption of street lighting equal to that during which the reduction has been in force. 1940 Journal
Hove Hangleton Road is being widened to 64', comprising two 20' carriageways, 4' wide central island and two 10' wide footpaths. The lighting was put into service on the 19th February 1937 and comprised 86 150W horizontal burning sodium lamps. These are mounted on double-arm brackets mounted on 43 steel poles in central island. The lamps are spaced at 110', mounted at 26' and have an overhang of 8'6". The whole system is divided into two sections and controlled from a switch pillar midway between each section. The columns and brackets are used for the first Unidirectional Lighting experiments by Holophane who use a specially modified Panel Refractor Lantern before the BLEECO lanterns were installed. BLEECO No. 1075 lanterns were used in the final installation and the installation was carried out by BLEECO. The refractor plates were designed by Holophane. The steel poles were supplied by the Newport and South Wales Tube Company Limited. Alternative lamps on adjacent columns are extinguished at 11PM. (The road is mistakenly called the Worthing Bypass, Hove in a Philips advert).

1937 Journal
1938 Advert
Hove Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Hove Hove Corporation placed an order with the GEC for a large quantity of fairyland strip, togetehr with 2,400 15W Osram lamps for promenade and pier lighting. 1939 Journal
Hoylake BTH Crown lanterns have been fitted to telegraph poles along Meols Drive, Hoylake. 300W and 500W Mazda gas-filled lamps have been used at a mounting height of 25' with a 6' overhang. The spacing ranges from 120' to 140', the majority being 125' apart. This spacing was decided upon by the Hoylake engineer, as many gateways and other openings prohibited a uniform arrangement. The total number of units is 260 and the work was carried out under the supervision of Mr. S. S. Forster, A.M.I.E.E., chief engineer to Hoylake Council. 1939 Journal
1943 Journal
Huddersfield During the year the mounting height of about 100 lamps has been increased by 3'. This, along with the addition of multi-ray reflectors placed under the back feed alignment burners of the 3-light No. 1 type, which has replaced circular burners, which has increased the illumination in the road and given a more even distribution. About 400 controllers have been fixed, some of them with Comet ignition and soem with the ordinary bye-pass with Nubloor tip. These Comet devices have proved very satisfactory. On a road 40' wide, a little over a mile in length, there have been substituted 6-light B/2 London Lamps and Maxill lamps suspended from trolley arms, with 5' overhang in the road, fixed on opposite sides of the road. These have replaced twin 4-light Rochesters fixed on alternate poles in staggered formation. The mounting height has been increased by 6'. 1937 Journal
Huddersfield Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Huddersfield War-time street lighting on a limited scale is to be provided for the coming winter, and the necessary number of fittings will be installed. 1940 Journal
Huddersfield In 1968, the GEC install the first UK installation of High Mast lighting using high pressure sodium lamp lanterns using 25 metre masts and 400W HPS lamps. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Hull Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Hull The new lighting on the Boulevard is by 26 250W mercury vapour lamps. The lamps are in staggered formation, and spaced at 160'-180' and the mounting height is 23'6". 1936 Journal
Hull Kingston-Upon-Hull was not permitted to maintain its public installation during the war by means of "star-lighting". When the city received the authority (for "Dim Out") the position was (1) The introduction of permitted temporary illumination for the whole City involved an expenditure of several thousand pounds; (2) It appeared this was the last black-out winter of the war; (3) Work done in a temporary way obviously slowed the complete re-introduction of post-war lighting; (4) To complete the whole City with temporary lighting would've taken 3 months by which time full post-war lighting could've been authorised. On the other hand there was the uncertainy of the period for which temporary lighting would be required. So it was decided only a limited number of lamps would be equipped with the new temporary lighting - approximately one in three. As far as the Department was concerned, it was necessary for the job to be tackled from the position created by air raid damage and four years of non-maintenance. Additionally the condition that all direct light must be kept below the horizontal meant the provision of a special fitting for every lamp and modification of the lampholders. However, by improvision, over 1000 lamps had been brought into commission by September 17th - only six days after receiving the authority. Tody there are 2000 lamps in commission and it's anticipated this will be increased to 3000. Instructions will be given for all of the lamps to be lit on the public transport routes. The improvision consided of a small tin shade encasing the lamp area. The main traffic routes are lit to 0.2 foot candles being under master control with the side streets limited to 0.02 foot candles. The public have welcomed the change from total black-out condition and it has created an atmosphere of cheerfulness and optimism. 1944 Journal
Huntingdon The Huntington (Staffs) Parish Council have entered into a 3-year contract for gas lighting in the streets under their control. 1939 Journal
Huntingdon There are about 160 gas lamps in Huntingdon where the Borough Council have renewed the contract for gas lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Hyde Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Hyde Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Ilford The Corporation has decided to proceed with the erection of a number of A.R.P. street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
Ilfracombe Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Ilkeston In 1932, the Corporation of Ilkeston had 735 gas lamps for street lighting; of these 350 were of the one-mantle type. During 1937 the total number of lamps had increased to 944 and only 180 one-light lamps are still in existence. A further 6 lamsp have been added during 1937-8 and it is hoped to raise the candle power of the smaller lamps in the near future. 1937 Journal
Ilkley Ilkley Urban District council have renewed their contract for gas lighting in Menston. 1939 Journal
Ilminster The Council have accepted the Lighting Committee's recommendations to enter into an agreement for 85 electric lamps. The whole town will be lit by electric street lighting by 1937. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Inverkeithing New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Ipswich Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Ipswich A five-year scheme for improving the lighting on the most important highways in the Borough at a cost of £20,000 has been inaugurated by the Counci's approval of the first installment of the work at a cost of £4,000 which will include about 6¾ miles. 1938 Journal
Irish Free State All the lamps, with the exception of 6,529, were the property of the Electricity Supply Board, were were lighted, maintained and operated by the Board at inclusive charges under contracts with the local authorities concerned. The 6,529 lamps referred to are in the central area of Dublin, are supplied with electricity by the Board, but are maintained and operated by the Dublin Corporation. 21,341 lamps were in operation. All Board-owned lamps, and a large number in Dublin, are automatically lighted and extingushed by time switches. No electric discharge lamps were operated by the Board. 1937 Journal
Islington "Between 1900 and 1903, rectified and alternating current prevailed and lamps of both types were run in series on a mains voltage of 2000V. Apart from these, parallel lighting was in vogue in the outlying districts. This lighting caused considerable anxiety. In the base of the standards was a transformer whereby the voltage was reduced to 40V. The transformers had a habit of burning out at about midnight. Then the whole of an area would be in darkness and a member of staff would turn out and travese many weary miles in all weathers to determine the culprit." 1938 Journal
Islington ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Islington £2000 is being spent on further improvements to the Borough's street lighting. This includes 240 new lamps. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Isle Of Man Considerable improvements are being carried out in the lighting of Castletown as a result of a five-year agreement for gas lighting which has been entered into by the Castleton Commissioners. Reflectors are now being fitted to all lamps and the candle power of lighting units is being raised. 1939 Journal
Jarrow After considerable delay, agreement has been reached between the Ministry of Health and the Council on a proposal to install sodium discharge lamps in York Avenue. The cost will amount to £1,332. With a view to improving the lighting in the centre of the town, the Council has recently erected four mercury discharge lamps in Ellison Street. 1938 Journal
Jarrow A new lighting installation has recently been installed in York Avenue. Thirty-nine sodium lamps have been erected by the North-East Coast Electric Supply Co., Ltd., at a cost of £1,332. 1939 Journal
Jarrow The Corporation has now decided to install electric street lightign for the first time on their new housing scheme, while a substantial section of the shopping centre is to lighted by 400W mercury discharge lamps. 1939 Journal
Jarrow York Avenue, which is a dual carriageway, each road 24' wide, grass centre 22' wide, has been lit by 250W sodium lamps mounted on 25' REVO steel columns with 13' overhang. They are spaced 180' apart, stagged to give effect of 90' spacing. 1939 Journal
Jersey Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Jersey The Parish of St. Martin's, Jersey, is now lighted by gas. The contract is for 10 years. 1937 Journal
Johnstone About 384 street lamps are involved in a renewed contract for gas lighting made by the Johnstone Corporation. 1936 Journal
Johnstone Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads through the town. 1940 Journal
Keighley A new gas installation has been installed at Keighley. The main roads passing through the centre of the town are lighted with large electic lamps whilst the Gas Department retains the light of the remainder of the main roads within the "built up" area with the original low-mounted square lanterns. Mr. F. N. Booth, Engineer and Manager of the Keighley Gas Department, with the aid of Wask Patent "Up And Down" Lamp Suspenders" by Walter Slingsby And Co. Ltd. (also of Keighley) have relit the Keighley-Kendal main road to Class F standard. The light is provided by Rochester suspension lamps fitted with Holophane dish refractors and K type wing reflectors on the kerb side, mounted 18', projecting 6', and spaced 126' apart in staggered formation. The Wask gear has been supplied with specially curved supply pipes to conform with suitable ornamental scrollwork. The maintenance cost is now little more than that of the old installation, whilst the danger to the maintenance man due to heavy traffic is elimated. 1937 Journal
Keighley A new scheme of road lighting on the portion of the Keighley-Bingley main road from Stockbridge to the Keighley borough boundary near Morton Lane is being carried out by the Keighley Corporation, the first portion of which has been completed. 1939 Journal
Keighley Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Kendal The main A6 road, is equipped with gas lighting consisting of 4-light and 6-light Rochester suspension lamps, erected on steel columns with a mounting height of 18' in staggered formation in intervals of approximately 120'. The council decided to equip this section of road with modified lighting units and a section comprising 8 lamps has already been completed to BS/ARP 37. Approval has been given to convert 61 lamps as soon as possible. In view of the few lamps to be put in lighting, it has been decided to keep them burning 24 hours per day. The total cost of the units will be £37 18s 0d and the estimated running costs for gas nine months in the year, 24 hours per day is £143 12s 6. The conversion unit has been found easy to fit in situ. Mr. Thomas Crowdy, Gas engineer of the Borough of Kendal, states "The Council and public here are so delighted with the low intensity lighting that I have to fit another 100 lamps in various sections of the town." 1940 Journal
Kendal Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Kenilworth Improved lighting in the main thoroughfare through Kenilworth has brought the standard up to that laid down by the Ministry of Transport Departmental Committee. The lamps are 28 6-light gas lamps fitted with reflectors; mounting height is 15 feet. The City of Coventry Gas Department are repsonsible for the installation. 1939 Journal
Kensington Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Kensington The GEC install the first UK installation of 5 ft. fluorescent tubes lanterns along Brompton Road in 1946. Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Kelty After a number of year-to-year contracts, the Fife County Council have entered into a 10-year contract for gas lighting.

1937 Journal
Kettering Kettering street lighting has been all-electric for a considerable number of years, but the Electricity Department has not confined its interest to the Borough area, a considerable number of parishes in the electricity supply area having adopted electric street lighting. Corby, a modern town of 12,000 people, has secured a new contract. The original 100W filament lamps have been superceded throughout the main streets by mercury discharge lighting. 1939 Journal
Kettering The Council has decided to obtain 400 additional war-time street lighting fittings if the manufacturers are able to supply then, at an estimated cost of £300. 1940 Journal
Keynsham, Bristol The Urban District Council propose to install sodium street lightign on the trunk road between Broadmead and the Glen at a cost of £2,268. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Kidwelly Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Kilbarchan (Renfrewshire) New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Killamarsh (Yorks) Has entered into a three-year contract for gas street lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Kingsbridge (Devon) Has signed a four year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Kingsbury Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Kingston Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Kingston, London, Bypass Changes being co-ordinated by the M.O.T. with Surrey County Council, Kingston Council, Surbiton Council, Malden Council and Wimbledon Council to make the Kingston by-pass safer. Plan is to convert the 30' road to a twin-track road of 40'. Malden Council have supplied for a grant to light their 3-mile section for £4,000. Lighting suggestion follows several crashes in the dark. The lack of lighting on the road has frequently been criticised. M.O.T. is now considering if the whole road should be illuminated. The road currently carried 16,000 motor vehicles a day. 1936 Journal
Kingston-On-Thames BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns and Diron Lanterns have been installed along Richmond Road.

1939 Advert
Kingston-Upon-Hull 125W mercury discharge lamps have been erected on two secondary roads, which are part of a bus route. The lamps are housed in silvered mirror reflectors of both directional and inverted bowl types, which are attached to cross-arms giving a projection over the roadway of 3'6", the mounting height being 18'6" and road width 24'. Cross-arms and overhead lines are carried on light tubular steel poles, with the exception of terminal positions, at which stouter poles are used, at a spacing of 116'. All chokes and condensers are housed in lead-coated steel sheet boxes which are clamped to the poles just below the cross-arms, the lamps being fed through line fues. The user of insultated conductor was necessary on account of the number of telephone lines. At approximately the midpoint of the overhead run a supply from the underground L.T. network is terminated in a cast-iron box of the department's own design. Switching is controlled by a contactor operated by a time switch, all being mounted in the box. The road surface (granite chippings) gives no assistance to visibility. Bus drivers comment very favourably upon the results. The MOT recommendation for this class of road (Group "B") is well exceeded, and the B.S.S. classification is "E", the test point figure being 0.14f.c. and the diversity 6. 1939 Journal
Kingston, London, Hook Underpass AEI lighting has been installed. 1960 Catalogue
Kingswood Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Kilmarnock There was pressure-wave control of the gas lighting while all electric lamps were controlled from the Police Station.. 1943 Journal
Kilmarnock Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Kirby-In-Ashfield The Urban District Council have renewed their contract for gas ligthing in all the streets under their control. About 326, all clock controlled, are affected. 1937 Journal
Kirby-In-Ashfield Extensive improvements are being carried out in the lighting of Kirby-In-Ashfield, where the Urban District Council has renewed its contract for gas lighting; the lighting is being extended by the Gas Department. 1939 Journal
Kirbymoorside Kirbymoorside (Yorks) Parish Council have entered into a 5-year contract for gas lightign in the streets under their control. 1939 Journal
Kirkburton Holmfirth Electricity Department has recently obtained a contract for supply of street lighting in the Thurstonland area of Kirkburton Urban District Council which is contiguous with Holmfirth. 81 150W filament lamps are being erected. When this scheme is completed, the Electricity Department will be giving supplied to 1,500 street lamps, which includes the whole of Holmfirth, New Hill and Honley, where street lighting is all electric. 1939 Journal
Kirkintilloch About 1160 lamps are covered by a renewal of the street lighting agreement by the Burgh of Kirkintilloch. Gas is the illuminant used. 1939 Journal
Kirkintilloch Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Knutsford Improvements to the lighting which is by gas are to start as a result of a new agreement between the Council and the local gas undertaking. 1937 Journal
Knutsford About 300 lamps are covered by the renewal of its agreement for gas lighting by the Knutsford Urban District Council. Improvements are to be carried out. 1938 Journal
Ladybank Burgh, Leslie Have schemes controlled by Henley Sharborn Remote Control Relays. 1939 Journal
Lambeth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Lambeth, London GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. By 1937, 1450 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1937 Advert
Lambeth, London The South Metropolitan Gas Company have secured a seven years contract for the relighting of 78 miles of streets. The Supervia directional lantern will be used with high pressure gas used for principle thoroughfares and low pressure gas for the others. The company will also continue to light 14 miles of main road already lit by high pressure gas. Of the 117 miles of streets lying within the Company's area of supply, 92½ will be lit by gas. This will also include the Vauxhall Cross improvement scheme. 1937 Advert
Lambeth, London The Metropolitan Borough of Lambeth provides a typical instance where both forms of illuminant have a share in road lighting. A 7 year contract for lighting 78 streets in the borough has been secured by the South Metropolitan Gas Company - the company's Supervia directional lamp will be used, with high-pressure gas for main thoroughfares and low-pressure gas for other roads. High-pressure gas will continue in use on about 14 miles of main roads. Of the 117 miles of streets, 92½ will be lighted by gas. The Borough Council has also accepted a contract with the South London Electricity Supply Corporation for lighting 34½ miles of streets in South Lambeth with Osira electric discharge lamps in GEC Di-fractor lanterns. Over 1000 lamps of 400W and 250W will be installed. 1937 Journal
Lambeth, London Lambeth has recently installed some 35½ miles of electric discharge lighting in the main traffic ways and also in the secondary thoroughfares, including passages and alleyways. This new lighting embraces all classes of road. It is the first time small alleyways and passages in a London Borough has been so illuminated, promoting the well-being of its citizens and their property lying off the beaten track. The lighting was inaugurated on April 7th by Alderman F. W. Mills, Mayor Of Lambeth. 1040 new units are to be installed: 900 new columns have been erected at the rate of 30 to 40 per day. In the main thoroughfares 400W and 250W Osira discharge lmaps are used, mounted at 25' about the roadway, and 6'6" on projection arms. In the secondary streets, passages and alleyway, 250W lamps at similar mounting heights are used. The lamps are housed in GEC Di-fractor lanterns, arranged in a staggered formation, and which direct the light in accordance with modern street lighting practice (presumably the Interim MOT Report.) Knights Hill, Norwood Road, Herne Hill, Brockwell Park, Denmark Hill and 25 miles of side streets have been relit. (Includes night photograph.) The scheme cost 23,000. The standards used were specially designed for the district and are known in the electrical industry as "Lambeth Posts". These are now being used by other local authorities. The installation is being carried out by the South London Electric Supply Corporation under a 15 years contract. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
1937 Catalogue
Lambeth, London The borough believe that with their two alternative sources of lighting, without the inherent bias inevitably associated with ownership of one or other of the supplies, they are able to judge the systems on their merits alone which is in the best interests of the rateplaers. Gas has been selected for this extensive programme of street lighting improvements, involving an additional 8¾ mile of high pressure lighting in which over 300 Supervia lamps will be required. The new lighting has been desgined and laid out to comply with BSS 307:1931 - principle roads illuminated to Class E Specification and remaining roads to CLass F. Previous high-pressure gas lighting consisted of 537 lamps and all these are being replaced by Supervia fittings. A further 304 lamps are being installed, mounted at 25', with an overhang of 6' and spaced at 180'. Three district compressing stations serve to compress the gas and all the high-pressure lamps in the area light up instantaneously. The side street lighting which is now being replaced by 70 miles of low-pressure Supervia lamps was installed in 1929 when the inverted pre-heated pattern burner was substituted for the upright type. Automatic clock controllers were introduced at the same time. When the new lighting is installed, the number of low-pressure lamps will number 3,500. These are mounted on special Eddystone columns, with swan necks, giving a height of 14½' to the mantle and staggered at 110' intervals.The mayor mentioned that they had not reached the stage where it could be definitely stated that gas or electricity was better for street lighting; and therefore the borough intended to maintain this healty rivalry between the two. Lambeth was the first borough south of the Thames to adpot high-pressure gas lighting. All work was carried out by the South Metropolitan Gas Company. (Includes night photographs.) 1937 Journal
Lambeth, London There are 899 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 899 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Lambeth, London Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed. These appear to be part of the gas scheme.

1937 Advert
Lambeth Electric street lighting has an important foothold. 1939 Journal
Lanark Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Lanarkshire Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
Lanarkshire The Sixth District Council has approved a report submitted by the County Engineer to convert from gas to electricity the lighting of a number of streets at Holytown and Newarthill. The changes involved will cost approximately £4,500. Between Holytown Cross and Clydesdale Street filament and mercury discharge lighting will be erected for comparative purposes. 1938 Journal
Lanarkshire BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Lancaster Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Leamington Sir Charles Bressey, at A.P.L.E. luncheon at the Savoy, expressed hope that in post-war days, that baskets of growing flowers would be accommodated on street-lamp columns. This idea was developed in Leamington Spa. The idea was introduced to the town by Mr. R. S. Salt, when Chairman of the Chamber of Trade some twenty years ago, and the custom has been maintained. 1944 Journal
Leamington £1350 to be expended by the Town Council on improvements of lighting in the town. All public lighting is gas. 1937 Journal
Leamington The lighting of the Upper Parade and Bath Street is to be improved. Leamington Priors Gas Company are providing and fixing steel columns down the centre of the Upper Parade, each carrying a pair of Keith high-pressure lamps, 10' apart across the Parade and 25' above the carriageway. The line of columns down the centre of the Parade is to correspond with the arrangement in a greater length of Parade and the increasing mounting height is to comply with the Ministry Of Transport Report. New high-pressure lamps are also to be installed in improved positions in Bath Street, which is an extension of the Parade. There will also be in both the Parade and Bath Street a number of Sugg's Rochester lamps with reduced lighting control for positions where the lamps are alight all night. Details of the 1939 scheme and before (lamps at 12' mounting height on the kerbs) and after (lamps at 25' mounting height down the centre) pictures were published in 1944. 1939 Journal
1944 Journal
Leamington The Leamington Corporation are continuing their experiments with low-intensity lighting, and have placed an order for a further 100 units to be fixed in selected main and side streets. 1940 Journal
Leamington Spa The Leamington Priors Gas Company carried out the improved installation of lighting, changing over from "Star Lighting" to "Moon Lighting." The results have been worth the trouble and the people are Leamington Spa have expressed their satisfaction. 1944 Journal
Leatherhead The Urban District Council has made a 10-year agreement for the lighting of the Ashtead and Bookham wards by gas. Before arriving at its decision the Council considered alternative illuminants. Under the new agreement considerable improvements will eb carreid out in the lighting, which involves 458 lamps. About 333 lamps are being increased in candle power and the mounting height is also being increased. Reflectors are fitted to all lamps. 1938 Journal
Leatherhead Under a new agreement all new street lighting in Leatherhead Urban District erected in the next ten years will be electric. The agreement also renews the existing contract for electric street lighting. Arrangements are in hand for new lighting in Eastwick Park Drive and other roads to be in accordance with "Final Report" recommendations for "Group B" roads. The main road through Bookham is to be provided with "Group A" lighting by filament lamps at 25' mounting height. Ten year contracts have been signed between the Leatherhead Urban District Council and the Joint Electricity Authority and between the Council and the Wandsworth And District Gas Company, which results in the following allocation of new and existing lighting: Ashtead Ward, all existing and new lamps to be gas lighted; Leatherhead Ward, all existing new lamps to be electrically lighted; Fetcham and Bookham Wards, all existing lamps gas lighted, all new lamps electric. At the time the contract was signed there were 478 gas lamps and 275 electric lamps in the Council area, and since that date 33 new gas lamps and approximately 70 new electric lamps have been erected. 1939 Journal
1939 Journal
Ledbury Has entered into a five-year gas contract. 103 gas lamps are in commision. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Leeds Leeds Gas Department is experimenting with a new light device for public lighting. The light is concentrated on the footpaths and the road is left in darkness, thereby decreasing dazzle and giving motorists a better view of pedestrians stepping into the roadway. 1936 Journal
Leeds Number of gas lamps increased by 382 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Leeds 644 miles of streets are lit by gas and 25 miles are lit by electricity. There are 20,158 gas lamps and 1,309 electric lamps. The annual expenditure is £15,803. 1937 Journal
Leeds Additional work in 1937 has been the lighting of new residential streets. Attention has again been paid to the improvement of main road lighting by the introduction of higher-powered lanterns and directional reflectors. All lamps are automatically controlled. 1937 Journal
Leeds Members of the Corporation Gas Committee recently inspected some experimental street lighting installations in various parts of Leeds. Lanterns in Duke Street, Regent Street and Roseville Roads are fitted with special bowl refractors and 500W filament lamps, the narrow portion of Rosevill Road where it joins Roundhay Road, and some lanterns in St. Peter's Street, near the junction with York Street, carry 300W lamps. In North Street, 500W lamps at 18' mounting height with an overhang of 3'6" have been erected. The reason for not adopting the 25' mounting height recommended by the MOT Final Report is that existing poles have been used for the experimental installation. A short installation of 400W direct discharge lamps has been erected in Cookridge Street. The mounting height in this case is 25' spacing varying from 120' to 150'. The lighting in City Square was inspected, as also was the new system of lighting ine East Parade, equipped with special bowl refractors which could be converted at any time for electric discharge lighting. 1938 Journal
Leeds Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Leeds Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Leeds The Yorkshire Post reported on the new street lighting to be installed in the city on the 3rd October 1940. Two points mentioned were that the illumination is only 0.00025 foot candle-power on the ground and that it will be available over 24 hours. The Ministry Of Home Security urging that a system of low-intensity street lighting should be installed had been written to the council. The system had been tried out in one part of the city, had been installed there and was found to be very satisfactory. The system would cost £25,000. 1940 Journal
Leeds The Yorkshire Post reported that the subdued street lighting provided by the approved star-light equipment will come into operation again. Since last winter the Gas Department's plans for equipping all the main thoroughfares in the city with star-light fittings has been completed. The subdued lighting was very much appreciated. Alderman A. R. Bretherick, chairman of Leeds gas Committee, stated that "It is important that everybody should appreciate that the equipment conforms in every way to the Home Office specification, which has been approved by the Air Ministry after actual tests from the air. We were later in Leeds than most places in putting this lighting into operation, because we wanted to be entirely satisfied that there was no risk of it being seen from the air. Last year some of the lamps suffered considerable damage from people who were afraid of the subdued lighting could be seen from the air. Once they are lighted, the lamps will remain burning throughout the 24 hours of each day." The Chief Constable stated that steps would be taken against any person found interfering in an way with this illumination. 1941 Journal
Leek Haywood Street is lit by eight-light Maxill Lamps mounted on a special sectional steel column. The staggered spacing is 160' with a mounting height of 25' with a 6' foot overhang. 1936 Paper
Leicester Earliest efforts of street lighting consisted of three-wick oil-lamps which needed trimming every hour. The first street lamps were lit in 1821. 1939 Journal
Leicester Description and history of lighting department. It was one of the first towns in England to have a separate lighting department. As of 1936, there is a population of 262,000 and 8,954 gas and electric lamps to illuminate its 260 miles of streets. 1936 Journal
Leicester After a successful twelve-month trial of mercury discharge lamps, this type of lighting is to be used in two new schemes. Lighting will be by two lamps on double-arm brackets, mounted at 25' and spaced 120' apart in the centre islands. There will be 73 units along Melton Road and 132 units along Loughborough Road. Refractor lanterns with a non-axial asymmetric distribution will be used. 50% of the lighting will be extingushed at midnight. Details of the new department are also given. 1937 Journal
Leicester There are 5,772 public gas lamps in Leicester. During the last year, 68 additional lamps were erected in housing estates. 1937 Journal
Leicester During 1937, 68 additional gas lamps were erected in housing estates. As a result of the electrification of tram routes, 100 gas lamps were discontinued. The lighting of Great Central Street, Groby Road and Fosse Road, was converted from gas to electricity, the scheme comprising 110 200W lamps in open type non-axial reflectors. The scheme will also be controlled from the head office. The conversion of 142 lamps in side streets from gas to electricity was also completed. The lighting of Blackbird Road was improved during the year, the 42 150W lamps on ordinary columns being replaced by 74 300W lamps mounted on double arm brackets along the centre island. The tramway departmetn co-operated in that the new lighting brackets also carry the trolley wires. Excessive filament breakage was experienced but is gradually disappearing by the use of a form of anti-vibrator. An experimental installation of sodium discharge lighting was erected in Clarendon Park Road, the scheme comprising 19 90W units in mirror reflectors. The units are mounted on tramway standards at a height of 20', and spaced at approximately 40 yards. A traffic roundabout was constructed at Loughborough Road and Red Hill, the general lighting effected by 400W mercury discharge lamps in open type fittings mounted on a double arm bracket 24' high. 1937 Journal
Leicester The new Loughborough Road and Abbey Lane are to be lighted by 250W mercury discharge lamps. The lanterns are to be mounted in pairs on steel poles at 125' spacing. The poles are to be erected on islands in the middle of the road. 1937 Journal
Leicester Under the guidance of lighting engineer Wilkie, black-out experiments take place in the city early in 1938. The arrangements made and the lessons learned from the experiment are outlined in Wilkie's later paper. The experiment took place from 1AM to 3AM on 28th January 1938. There was no moon and during the first hour the weather was dry, but at about 2AM rain commenced to fall. The rain proved of value since it gave two complete sets of conditions. Certain streets in the city were chosen for the actual driving exercise and 200 special constables diverted all traffic from the pre-arranged routes. The time taken to darken Leicester for the experiment was between 1¼ and 1½ hours.

1938 Paper
Leicester Taken from a survey of street lightign by Mr. Thomas Wilkie, Public Lighting Engineer, to members of the Leicester local Association of Engineers. The annual cost at the present time was approximately £47000, nearly twice as much as in 1924, the annual cost per lamp had been reduced. Thre were nearly 300 miles of lamplit streets and roads in the city: 156 miles have gas for their 5,500 lamps; whilst the rest are 4000 electric lamps. The area of lamp glass cleaned in twelve months totalled 270 acres. The failure rate was 1% nightly. The policy was to replace gradually the gas lamps with electric lamps. At the moment they had 75 employees and the wage bill was £12000. An interesting peep into the future was a lamp which was half the size of a cigareete which, when tethered to a balloon at a height of 1000', would illuminate a city the size of Leicester. 1939 Journal
Leicester The Leicester Watch Committee have decided on the complete electricifcation of the city street lighting. The Committee also considered that complete electrification was vital to the City's ARP plans as all electric street lighting can be extingushed at a moment's notice. 1939 Journal
Leicester Stanton columns and brackets were used to light a new dual-carriageway scheme. 1939 Journal
1939 Journal
Leicester In accordance with the resolution of the City Council, conversions from gas to electricity are proceeding apace. So far 17 roads have been converted, comprising 302 lamps in place of the existing 213 gas lamps. Mounting height and spacing is in accordance with the MOT Recommendations for Group B roads, 150 lamps being used. The roads being dealt with first are secondary main roads. Afterwards, purely side steets will be dealt with by district. The installation at Groby Road is strictly in accordance with the MOT Recommendations. Mounting height is 25' to source using 150W sodium lamps on concrete poles made by Stanton. Further schemes for main road lighting are under consideration including the first portion of the new inner-by-pass road and a considerable portion of the main Leicester-Coventry road. 1939 Journal
Leicester Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Leicester Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 241 miles of "starlight" lighting has been installed, numbering 8750 lanterns. 1940 Journal
Leicester In about five weeks, the whole of Leicester was changed to the 0.02 f.c. standard (Dim-Out). For various reasons the 0.2 f.c. standard was not adopted although a master switch is available. Main Roads: The pre-war electric fitting was never disturbed and the "starlighting" was supplied by means of an additional bracket at lower mounting height. The latter units have been converted to 0.02 f.c. by means of a special shade made locally. Side Streets: The "starlight" fittings were removed and the pre-war lanterns were fitted with 15W lamps, slightly blackened. Gas Lighting: The only alteration was to remove the slotted screen. Progress is now being made in stepping up to 0.02 f.c. by removing the entire screen and pain washing a certain portion of each lamp pane. The general public is well satisfied with the relaxations. 1944 Journal
Leicester AEI Amberline lighting has been installed. 1960 Catalogue
Letchworth Conversion to sodium electric discharge lamps is to take place on Hitchin Road and Baldock Road. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Leven Electric street lighting is to be provided in the main streets at a capital cost of £1600. Annual running costs for the improved lighting will be £165, compared with £393 for the previous ligthing, which was not electric. 1939 Journal
Lewisham Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. About 300 400W Osira lamps in Lewisham lanterns have been used to light the main thoroughfares. 1935 Catalogue
1937 Catalogue
Lewisham GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. By 1937, 159 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1937 Advert
Lewisham There are 177 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 29 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Lewisham As soon as discharge lamps had proved their value, Lewisham converted all main road lighting from gas to electricity, and was one of the first authorities to adopt mercury discharge lighting on a large scale. The Council now feels that the time is ripe for the improvement of side street lighting, in accordance with the recommendations of the MOT Final Report. In the first instance, an additional annual maintenance and running charge of approximately £10,565 is contemplated, to be reduced in 10 years, when the major portion of the capital cost of £42,440 has been amortised, by some £5,135. The spacing of the existing gas standards is considerably in excess of that required, and 1,620 new standards will be necessary, at an approximate cost of £7,000. The minimum mounting height for all side road columns will be 15' and the hours of lighting will be increased to 4,100 per annum. It was estimated that an equivalent gas lighting scheme would involve an additional capital expenditure of £45,540 compared with £42,440 of the electricity scheme, and additional annual charges of £13,100 against £10,656 of the electricity scheme. On completion of this scheme, Lewisham's lighting will be completely electric. 1938 Journal
Lewisham The Minister Of Health has sanction the borrowing by the Lewisham Metropolitan Borough Council of £42,440 for better street lighting installation. 1939 Journal
Lewisham The Borough Engineer has called attention to the lighting of the Stanstead Road and suggested a revision of the lighting. Lighting in this road was improved a few years ago by the provision of 400W gaseous discharge electric lamps, but these lamps were installed in the early days of improved street lighting, and the present pinciples and standards recognised by lighting engineers had not then been adopted. The Works And Highways Committee recommended that the existing spacing of the standards, which is approximately 180', should be reduced, the lighting on the curves of the road modernised and some additional lamps erected. With the reduction in the spacing of the standards the wattage of the lamps can be reduced from 400W to 250W. In connection with this proposal the Committee also considered a report in relation to the lighting of Torridon Road. Directions were recently given for the lighting in a portion of Torridon Road t o be revised by the substitution of 250W gaseous discharge lamps for 400W lamps. The Borough Engineer now suggests that the lighting in this part of Torridon Road should be revised to accord with the filament lighting recently provided in another portion of the road i.e. by the erection of standards spaced approximately 100' apart and fitted with 200W filament lamps. The Borough Council's scheme to improve the lighting of side streets is making good progress, 636 electric lamps having now been brought into use, displacing 329 gas lamps and standards. 1939 Journal
Lewisham Electric street lighting has an important foothold. 1939 Journal
Layland At the last meeting of the Council, it was decided to make the application to the Ministry Of Health to borrow £1,250 for the installation of 150W mercury discharge lamps from Old Cross to the boundary at Farington. 1938 Journal
Leigh (Lancs) Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Leighton Buzzard A ten year agreement for the lighting of Leighton Buzzard by gas has been entered into by the Urban District Council. Various improvements are being carried out. High Street and Market Square are to be lit to Group "A" standard as recommended by the MOT by means of fifteen 12-light gas lamps mounted at 25' and spaced 150' apart; clock controllers and automatic igniters will be fitted. Twenty-two similar lamps will light two other busy thoroughfares. Four subsidiary roads will have lighting which will comply with Group "B" standard. Here 6-light and 4-light lamps fitted with clock controllers and automatic igniters will be used, mounted at 15' and spaced at 120'. Nineteen 6-light and twenty-six 4-light lamps will be installed. On a number of subsidiary roads 3-light lamps will replace those of lower candle power and the mounting height of existing lamps will be increased. 204 lamps are used for subsidiary lighting. 1939 Journal
Leyton A quotation of £493 has been accepted by Leyton Borough Council from the Automatic Telephone and Electric Company for the installation of centralised street lighting control. 1937 Journal
Leyton Lea Bridge Road lit by mercury discharge lighting. 1937 Advert
Leyton With the introduction of mercury discharge lamps in the main road, the contrast between the main road and side road lighting is very marked. The Council has now decided to classify as major side roads some 35 of the principle thoroughfares in the Borough. 35 of these roads are being fitted with 315 125W quartz type mercury discharge lamps at a total cost of over £4000. 1937 Journal
Leyton BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Lichfield 24 lamps are being provided with war-time street lighting fittings as an initial experiment. 1940 Journal
Limerick, Ireland Sarsfield Bridge and O'Connell Street relit by Mr. Frank Algar of Dublin. Installations cariied out by the Electricity Supply Board of Dublin for the Corporation of Limerick City. On Sarsfield Bridge, 16 standards have been installed, each carrying a pair of 300W lamps in refractor fittings. The length of the bridge is 560' and the width is 40'. The O'Connell Street installation includes 1000W lamps in decorated lanterns suspended on span wires centrally over the carriageway with heights ranging from 21'6" to 24'6". All street lighting in Limerick, is maintained in operation from a half-hour after sunset until a half-hour before sunrise. (Includes night pictures). 1936 Journal
Lincoln Following on their recent installation of modern gas lamps on the Newark Road, the Lincoln City Council has now decided to extend this form of lighting. A further 59 lamps of the same type are to be installed on additional stretches of main roads. About 26 high pressure gas lamps of another type are to be used to modernise the lightng on two other roads in the district. 1938 Journal
Lincoln The Council has given sanction to the Electrical Engineer to experiment with apparatus suitable for the control of street lighting in case of emergency. Ripple control is contemplated. As a further experiment, colour-corrected mercury lamps are to be installed in Silver Street and Guildhall Street. 1938 Journal
Lincoln BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Lincoln New gas lighting has been installed along an important thoroughfare by the Lincoln Corporation Gas Department. Lamps of 1,500 candle powere are used at an average spacing of 105'. The mounting heights of the lamps is 25'. 1939 Journal
Lincoln After successful experiments with low-power street lighting, it has been decided to extend the system of the whole of the City's main thoroughfares. Most of the 400 lamps will be gas-lighted. 1940 Journal
Linlithgow Have entered into a 3 year contract for street lighting. 1938 Journal
Linwood, Renfrew The Council has recommended that £760 should be spent on adapting lighting standards in Linwood for electricity and for the erection of 38 new standards on one of the housing estates. 1939 Journal
Lisburn Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Lisburn Lisburn District Council is considering the installation of gas "starlights" in the streets. 1940 Journal
Littlethorpe Have signed a three year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Liverpool First lighting authority to install reinforced concrete columns in 1931. They were made by Concrete Utilities Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Liverpool Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Liverpool 940 miles are lit: 597 by gas, 343 by electricity and 1/44th of a mile by oil. The number of mantles used during the year was 80,000. Of the 16,189 electric lamps, 757 were sodium and the rest gas-filled, the number of gas lamps being 15,799. The sodium system, inaugurated the previous year (1936), has been considerably extended, 597 lamps having been installed or converted in 7.2 miles of streets. The system of superimposing a high frequency impulse on the electric mains has been further extended during the year by the inclusion of 1,713 lamps. The total number of lamps now operated by this system from 23 control points is 4,342 of which 3,189 are operated by individual units and 1,153 by 78 group units. The net mileage of gas-lighted streets has decreased by 17¾ miles, with 480 fewer lamps, this is said to be the policy of substituting electricity for gas when carrying out improvement schemes, and also as opportunity occurs. The policy has been extended of maintaining the same standard of uniformity of surface illumination after midnight by fixing or substituting fittings with two units in each (one in each being extinguished at 11:30PM) in lieu of fittings with one unit in each and alternative lamps extinguished at 11:30PM. The principle of raising the mounting height of the ordinary lamp columns, also affecting the uniformity of surface illumination, has steadily progressed. In order to eliminate glare and to secure improved visibility, 960 lamps in 24.1 miles of streets have been fitted with special lamps, both electric and gas, desgined for this purpose. The number of reinforced concrete lamp columns and lighting poles now totals 2690 and 603 respectively. 1937 Journal
Liverpool Wardle Liverpool lanterns have been erected along Queen's Drive. 1937 Advert
Liverpool Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1938 Journal
Liverpool An interesting new street lighting shceme has been placed in operation in Hillfoot Avenue, the new by-pass at Hunts Cross. Hillfoot Avenue is a four carriageway road, comprising service carriageways at each side, and two through traffic carriageways in the centre. It is lighted by 100W sodium lamps in cut-off fittings mounted at 26' and spaced 90' in staggered formation. 1938 Journal
Liverpool Sodium lighting has been installed at the junciton of Menlove Avenue and Allerton Road, Mossley Hill and at cromptons Lane Corner, Calderstones. Additional improvements will include sodium discharge lighting along Queens Drive. This activity forms part of a vast coordinated scheme and when complete it will be possible to drive four miles and a half on evenly lighted main roads from Knotty Ash to Sefton Park. A further 8 miles of similar lighting is to be started by a sodium discharge installation at Booker Avenue. 1938 Journal
Liverpool P. J. Robinson, M.Eng.M.I., Mech.E., M.I.E.E. is the City Electrical Engineer. It was the first authority to take up concrete lamp columns. They have used concrete for all side street columns. 1938 Catalogue
1939 Journal
Liverpool Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Liverpool Mr. R. E. Rogers retires from the position of Deputy City Lighting Engineer in Liverpool. Rogers had taken part of the share of modernising the street lighting of Liverpool, including the introduction of Sodium lamps, and his unique solution to the difficulty of the lighting of the roads abutting Speke Aerodrome. 1939 Journal
Llandovery The Town Council have decided in favour of gas for the public lighting of the borough, and a contract for seven years has been entered into with the local gas company for the purpose. 1939 Journal
Llandovery An 8-year contract entered into by the Llandovery Borough Council provides for improved gas lighting in the streets under the Council's control. 1939 Journal
Llandrindod Wells 72 starlite war-time fittings have been installed. 1940 Journal
London Gas became the primary lighting medium in London's streets in the 1890s. The gas burners used were Bray or Fishtail. 1938 Journal
London Number of gas lamps in 1935 was 48,748 and in 1936 was 51,477, an increase of 2,729 lamps. 1937 Journal
London Including the City and the Metropolitan Boroughs there are 29 lighting authorities in London administering approximately 93,600 street lamps, of which the majority are electric. These exceed others by over 27%. Street lighting is all-electric in the boroughs of Battersea, Hackney, Hampsteaed, St. Marylebone, Shoreditch and Stepney; and virtually so in Bethnal Green, Fulham, Hammersmith and Poplar in which boroughs the aggregate number of gas lamps amounts to only 168. The most outstanding developments in recent years are the improvement schemes carried out at Camberwell and Deptford where the whole of the lighting is being converted to electricity, while at Lambeth and Lewisham electricity has gained a very important foothold. 1939 Journal
London, Aspey Gate Outside Aspey Gate (entrance into Hyde Park at Hyde Park Corner) stand six very fine cast-iron columns and inside stand two more. They are the only columns of their type in London. They were erected in 1827, in the reign of George IV. They have been used as gas lamps for 114 years. The Royal crests have almost disappeared and the dates have crumbled off all but one. 1941 Journal
London, Blackfriars Road Lit by a double-row of Supervia high-pressure gas lamps. It is one of the "show" streets in London as far as lighting is concerned. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
London, Chatham House This still has two of the linkboys' torch extinguishers, one each side of the front door, and also the framework which used to contain the candle lamp of the type which all residents of houses were compelled to hang out at certain times of the year when nights were long. 1941 Journal
London, City Gulcher and Brush type arc lamps were installed. The carbons were vertically opposed to one another and were non-focusing, whereby the arc point descended and the show of the base of the lantern was increased thereby. Brush lamps were in vogue for many years. 1938 Journal
London, Cornwall Terrace The columns were designed by Decimus Burton. The lamps, of which only 10 remain, were erected for flat-flame burners and afterwards converted to incandescent burners. They now carry electric lamps. They belong to the Crown Estates and when one is damaged they are pieced together with iron straps, beause it is impossible to replace them. These lamps go back to the days of the Regency when Regent's Park was built. 1941 Journal
London, Gower Street Lit with Simenes Sieray Discharge Lamps. (Includes night picture). Illuminated with 400W Metrovick S18 Refractor Bowl lanterns. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1939 Advert
London, Lambeth Road Osira lighting (MA/H) has just been installed. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
London, London Bridge The columns which carry the lamps on the parapet of London Bridge were cast from guns captured in the Peninsula Wars. 1941 Journal
London, North Circular Road Survey of street lighting installations in the London area. In the case of the North Circular Road, over a distance of 13 miles, there were 27 changes of lighting system e.g. 13' to 30' mounting heights, and all manner of types and sizes of equipment. 1936 Journal
London, North Circular Road Part of the North Circular Road in the Totttenham district has been lit by 6-light gas lamps, fitted with refractors and stainless-steel wing reflectors on concrete columns. It is an excellent example of a dual carriageway installation resulting in glare-free lighting and good visibility. 1938 Journal
London, Pall Mall One hundred years of gas lighting. Erected by Winsor, the founder of The Gas Light And Coke Company. 1938 Advert
1941 Journal
London, Prince Consort Road This street was famous for the close spacing of its lamp-posts, despite being little traffic. A yong man was killed in this road after being run over by a horse vehicle. The verdict wa that the accident was caused by the bad lighting. When his mother died, she bequeathed £3000 to the Parish, the interest devoted to the better lighting of the road. 1941 Journal
London, The Mall The first two columns of either side of the Admirality Arch inside the Mall are cast in bronze whilst the rest are cast iron. 1941 Journal
London, Trafalgar Square Two of the lamp columns with cherubs at base supporting three gas lanterns were cast in 1878. On the four corners are four wll-proportioned dwarf columns fixed to the top of the corner granite piers on which there are four peculiarly shaped lanterns, the two on the National Gallery side being smaller than those on the Whitehall side. Two of them have 32 panes of glasss and the lamp attendants are paid extra money for cleaning them. It is said they were some of the original oil lamps from Nelson's flagship, but other information is that they were made from the bronze guns from Nelson's ship. The dwarf columns are pure bronze and the authorities used to have the columns burnished. 1941 Journal
London, Trafalgar Square Two lamp columns stand in Trafalgar Square at the top of Northumberland Avenue. They were cast in 1878 and each column carries three high-pressure gas lamps. They were designed by George Vulliamy and erected in 1883. 1941 Journal
London, Worburn Place Sieray (Siemens) lighting. 1936 Advert
Loughborough Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Ludlow A further five year contract has been settled for lighting the streets of the Borough of Ludlow by gas. Under the present contract reflectors are to be fitted to all lamps as they are renewed. 1938 Journal
Lurgan About 308 lamps are affected by a renewal of the contract for gas lightingin force in the area covered by the Lurgan Urban District Council. 1939 Journal
Luton After experimenting with tungsten, mercury and sodium lamps, the Luton authority have decided in favour of sodium, on the grounds of low running costs and exceptionally good visibility. The lighting of Park Road is the first section to be put into service. This is the main thoroughfare from the Vauxhall Motor Works and at certain times it carries an exceptionally high volume of traffic. As no underground service was available, and no load other than street lighting could be expected, then overhead wiring was used, as being the most economical scheme. The standards are mounted on one side of the road, spaced 40' apart, with a mounting height of 25'. Thirty-five points are used comprising ELECO Golden Ray refractor lanterns with Philips Philora 140W lamps. (A picture of the installation is included in another part of the journal). 1939 Journal
Lymington In the High Street, by the Parish Church, stands a unique monument in the shape of a lamp column. It has a large square base with inscriptions on each side, surmounted by a fluted shaft, on which is installed a Sugg 6-mantle Rochester lamp. On the base of the colum it stated on a cast iron plate: "This town was first lighted by gas on the 20th September 1832." The town is still lighted by gas. The momument shows the gifts to the town from 1667 to 1833 and contains details of monies bequethed for dividing amongst the poor, for the erection of schools and the eduction of poor children, for building almshouses, the presentation of a clock, payments to the curates of the Church, and on the last page is an account of the year 1831: "It having become desirable to introduce public lamps into the streets and thoroughfares of the town, the parish was, by a resolution of the inhabitants in vestry, placed under the Act II, George IV, cap. 27, (called the Lighting Watching Act), on the 30th of December 1831 and the accomplishment of this object was greatly facilitated by: Sir Harry Burrard Neal's Gift in 1832 to the parish of all the iron gas pillars and brackets, at an expense of about £200; George Burrard, Esq (MP for the Borough) for a gift of £100 for the purchase of lamps and fittings; and the lighting was extended into the Chruch by means of a gift by John Stewart, Esq. in 1833 (MP for the Borough) who presented the Parish with the gas fittings, fixing etc. at an expense of £170". The inscriptions on the remaining sides of the plinth are :"The whole of the Public Lamps were presented to his Town by George Burrard, Esquire." and "Erected by Subscription as a Tribute of Respect and Gratitude to Admiral St Harry Neale, Bt. G.C.B. for his munificent Gift of the Iron Columns for the Publc Lamps in this town. 1832". 1939 Journal
Lymm Gas used for public lighting in Lymm amounted to 2,003,300 cubic feet compared with 1,896,700 the previous year, 1,638,700 in 1934. The number of street lamps has increased from 199 in 1934 to 219. 1937 Journal
Lyndhurst The Parish Council have determined on a 10 year agreement for gas lighting in their area. Improvements in the lighting are to be carried out. 1939 Journal
Lytham St. Annes Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Mablethrope And Sutton The Marblethrope and Sutton Urban District Council have recently concluded a further six-year contract for public lighting by gas. 1937 Journal
Maidenhead ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Maidstone The street lighting of Maidstone was switched on from a centralised control panel by Mr J. M. Kennedy, O.B.E. in 1937. The Actadis ripple control system was used, the first time it was used in the UK. 1937 Journal
Maidstone The lighting engineer for Maidstone reported that he was having trouble making his local gas and electricity undertakings install installations which adhered to the MOT Report. Their arguments were simply that the MOT Report was a recommendation and not a specification e.g. it was not mandatory. The argument that the MOT Report was the basis for a future specification fell on deaf ears. 1938 Journal
Maidstone BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Maidstone Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Maidstone Cited as a town which could turn off all its lighting in the event of an air raid. This was put to C. W. Johnson (Under-Secretary Of State at the Home Office) during the APLE's London meeting in November 1939 to discuss the "black-out" 1940 Journal
Maldens and Coombe, London Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Malton Malton U.D.C. have entered into a five year gas contract. New lamps are to replace those of an older type. The lighting of the clocks on the Town Hall and parish church will also be carried out by gas. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Malton Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Malton Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Malvern A number of modern gas lamps of a higher candle power have been substituted for the existing lamps in certain roads in Malvern and similar improvements are planned in other areas of the town. The Corporation Gas Department is responsible for the lighting of the town, in which some 1,350 lamps are used. 1938 Journal
Manchester GEC lighting was installed in the early 1920s. 1920 Catalogue
Manchester Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Manchester They have installed mercury vapour lamps in Bury but will welcome colour-corrected versions. The colour had been a handicap in Bury - for two years Mr. W. E. Greenhalgh (Street Lighting Superintendent) had been telling his committee that "it was better to appear dead than to feel dead!" 1936 Journal
Manchester Trials have been taking place one of the outlying districts of injecting trains of high-frequency impulses between the distribution system and earth. Relays tuned to this frequency will respond to the impulses and switch lamps on or off. 1937 Journal
Manchester New electric lighting fittings to the tune of £5,000 are to be provided by the Electricity Department. 1937 Journal
Manchester During 1937, 699 additional electric lamps were erected, 118 replacing gas lamps; 72 new gas lamps were erected. On other roads, 82 gas lamps were removed owing to re-spacing, slum clearance, etc. An additional 14 miles of roads and passages were lighting. During the year 3280 automatic controllers were fitted to gas lamps, making a total of 8492; 956 lamps had the mounting height increased by extension pieces, etc., and directive equipment was installed in all of these. The number of gaseous discharge lamps was increased by 56 to a total of 166, all these being of the 250W size. The system of centralised control by high frequency impulse has proved satisfactory and is now being extended to other areas. New lighting is planned in conformity with BS 307:1931. 1937 Journal
Manchester The Chief Constable has applied or the floodlighting of 52 police point-duty posts in different parts of Manchester after the successful trial in London Road. The Highways Committeee has approved the scheme subject to the Watch Committee paying a porportion of the cost. 1937 Journal
Manchester The Corporation Electricity Department is introducing a system of centralised street lighting control, and when this is completed, it will be possible to operate the whole of the electric street lighting system from one point at the City centre. The system will enable full control of street lighting for normal lighting and extinguishing, and during overcast periods in day-time; it will also give instantaneous control in case of air raids. 1938 Journal
Manchester The installation in Manchester Road, Bury is the "best lighted in the country" has been made by Mr. W. E. Greenhalgh, A.M.I.Fire.E, Chief Officer, Bury. He supports his claim with the following statement:

Type of Road: Residential
Fittings: Silvered Mirror Reflector
Lamps: Sodium Vapour
Light Source: Central Suspension
Mounting Height: 23'
Spacing: 120'
Width of Road: 35'
Illumination: Class D (nearly Class C)
Average Illumination: 0.56 foot candles
Diversity Ratio: 2.24 to 1
Consumption: 150W per point

A motorist travelling along this roadway can see an obstruction 300 yards distance. No fatal accident has occurred on the roadway since the installation. Mr Greenhalgh states: "I think I am right in saying that the averaging of foot candles on a given length of roadway is retrograde in application since one could have a shocking example of street lighting which, measured under this system, could have excellent results on paper. I think our Association of Public Lighting Engineers should insist on the diversity factor in all computation and comparisons."

1939 Journal
Manchester Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Manchester Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
Manchester Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Manchester The fixing of clockwork and by-pass controllers to Manchester gas "starlight" street lamps during the last few months will result in substantial saving of gas during the winter. Before the war these controllers were working on all gas street lamps. When street lighting ceased they were dismantled, with the result that when the department began to feel the shortage of staff the "starlight" had to be left on all day. During the double summert-time period the extra use of gas had been offset by a reduction in the number of lights in use. Now these are being restored and the controllers will eliminate any waste. There's no intention of reducing the number of electric starlights. lanterns. 1942 Journal
Manchester Has installed "Dim Out" lighting and has just decided to light the side streets as well as the main streets. 1944 Journal
Mansfield Mansfield Gas Department sent out 32,729,000 cubic feet of gas during February, an increase of 5,073,000 cubic feet over February 1939. The re-lighting of the street lamps accounts for part of the increase. 1940 Journal
Marden (Kent) The Parish Council has entered into contracts for a term of five years for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Margate Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Margate Public lighting engineer H. V. Emptage and he has authority over the streets and promenades of Margate and the surrounding towns (including Westgate-On-Sea and Birchington). Gas is the main illuminant except for one short promenade which is lit by electricity. Lanterns range from Sugg Windsor square lanterns fitted with two Bijou mantles and multi-ray reflectors (at 11'6") to 15-light Sugg Upright Littleton lamps (at 17'8"). Lighting of main sea front road (Marine Terrace, Marine Drive and Parade) is by 5- (12'8") and 9-light (14'8") Upright Littleton Lamps fitted with No. 2 mantles spaced at 23 to 32 yards apart, staggered. To improve the lighting at points where the road is wide, the installation is augmented by high columns with 3-way ornamental pediments and three 5-light Littleton Suspension Lamps. There are also four 9-light Littleton Suspension Lamps around the Clock Tower. The illumination of this road comes within Class "E" of the British Standards Specification (1931). The other promenades are provided with 5-light Upright Littleton Lamps at 12'8", spaced at 30-38 yards, and augmented at wide spots by high columns with 3-way fitments, each carrying three 5-light Littleton Suspension Lamps. The Rendezvous Promenade is lighting by means of 9-light Upright Littleton Lamps mounted at 14'8". The promenade along which the lighting medium is electricity has 150W lamps 20 yards apart, but have to be shaded due to the Coastguard look-out on the Promenade above. 1936 Journal
Margate For many years Margate has been noted for the progressive outlook of its Council. In pursuing this policy, the Public Lighting Superintendent, Mr. H. V. Emptage, felt that electric street lighting could provide better and more attractively lighting streets by night, with the resultant increase in safety, but would also improve the daylight appearance of the town. Therefore, in 1936, the Public Lighting Committee adopted a Mercra discharge lighting scheme for a stretch of the Canterbury Road, which is the main traffic outlet for the town. The equipment was supplied by BTH and was erected, serviced and maintained by the Isle Of Thanet Electricity Supply Company in contract to the Margate Corporation. So successful was the lighting on this short stretch that its popularity justified immediately the work which has been undertaken and several further schemes were under consideration, both for new roads and for conversation from the existing gas lighting. The electricity supply in the old Borough of Margate is direct current, which ruled out Mercra lighting for this central area, so further schemes had to be considered for using Tungsten filament lighting. Several installations were tried with different types of fittings and it was finally decided to standardise upon the BTH Diron for high wattage Mercra lighting, with the BTH Ranger for main roads where tungsten filament lighting was necessary, and the BTH County Junior for the less imporant thoroughfares. The decision was reached with a view to obtaining equipment which would give good and consistent daytime appearance in addition to a high standard of safe road lighting by night. Elecrtic lighting has now been installed through the main shopping thoroughfares and along the sea front and promenades. There is now a continious line of electric lighting from the eastern end of the sea front and Canterbury Road to the old Westgate boundary, a length of 3.3 miles. This re-lighting has resulted in a remarkable improvement: there are no shadows on the road, absence of glare, uniformity of lighting throughout and a considerable saving in costs per annum. It is proposed to carry this lighting along the Canterbury Road to Birchington Square as soon as the road widening has been completed, another 2¼ miles. The progressive nature of the relighting programme in Margate can be judged from the fact that in 1936 there were only 32 electric light points in the borough, 22 of them being low wattage, whilst less than three years later thsi number has grown to over 550, distributed over 11 miles of roadway. Along most of the main traffic routes in Margate the gas lighting has been replaced by modern electric lighting. The objective has been to provide a standard at least equally as good to that previously existing (when referring to the old BSS classification) and gratifying to note that the increase to 25' mounting height has materially improved the appearance of the roadway and the effectiveness of the lighting. On average, the distance between units is 120'. The columns and lanterns are painted silver/aluminium paint. 296 BTH Ranger have been used, mounted on tubular steel columns at 25', with 300W Mazda lamps, the lighting within Class E of the BSS. The roads coverered by these lanterns are: All Saints Avenue, Canterbury Road, Northdown Road, Eastern Esplanade, Palm Bay Avenue, Ethelbert Cresent, The Terrace, Cliff Terrace, Fort Cresent, The Parade, Marine Drive and Marine Terrace. In addition there are 15 BTH Diron lanterns fitted with 400W Mercra lamps which give Class D on Canterbury Road. These installations fall within Group A of the MOT Final Report. Some less important roads have received new lighting: these are new roads which will be developed and have heavier traffic; and tree-lined roads where the fittings had to be projected well over the carriageway. Accordingly 100W Madza lamps were used and the following roads were lighted by BTH County Junior lanterns mounted at 25' above the ground with appreciable projection of bracket arm: Gordon Road, Northdown Park Road, Northumberland Avenue, Dalmeny Avenue and Royal Esplanade. This treatment has proved remarkably successful, the surface brightness being exceptionally uniform, especially on narrow carriageways. A similar treatment with 200W Mazda lamps in BTH County Junior or Crown lanterns have been used in Northumberland Avenue, Northdown Estate, Athelstan Road and Northdown Park Road with 125W Mercra lamps in Station Road, Birchington. This method of lighting, although successful, does not meet with the full approval of the MOT Report, and other Group B roads use a more conventional lay-out, using County Junior lanterns on cast-iron columns at 15' mounting height and spaced at 115'. 1939 Journal
Market Weighton New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Markyate, Herts Markyate will be gas-lighting this year as a consequence of the renewal of the lighting contract by the local authority. 1939 Journal
Marlowe Sanction to borrow £1,760 for the electrification of Marlowe street lighting has now been received from the Minister Of Health. The whole town is lit by electric street lighting by 1937. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Matlock 570 gas lamps are affected by a new street lighting contract which covers Matlock and the surrounding district. 1937 Journal
Merton BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Mexborough Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Mexborough Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Middlesborough Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Middlesborough The Town Council have sanctioned the expenditure of £11,250 on the erection of an "electricity showroom" at Linthorpe Road. 1937 Journal
Middlesbrough During the past year, 134 gas lamps were erected and 46 displaced, making an additional number of 88. The gradual conversion of bus routes to suspension lighting was responsible for 36 of these displaced lamps. Slum clearance schemes were responsible for the remaining 10 lamps. The 72 2-light (square type lanterns) were installed on new housing estates; mounting height 14'.The increase in the mileage of roads during the year was 2½ miles, making a total of 107½ miles (gas 105½ and electric 2). Improved lighting was obtained on four sections of bus routes by installing 40 suspension lamps fitted with Holophane refractors. Mounting heights 17'6" to 20'. 25 of these were 5-light, 12 6-light and 3 10-light. The minimum and maximum mounting height of all new installations is 14' and 20'. 1937 Journal
Middlesbrough In connection with the Final Report of the Departmental Committee of the Ministry of Transport on Street Lighting, Middlesbrough Corporation Lighting Committee on the recommendation of the Superintendent of Street Lighting shall be planned to conform with the recommendations both for Group A and Group B. 1938 Journal
Middlesbrough Public Lighting Engineer, John Pallister, advocated the use of gas for public lighting. "As Public Lighting Engineer to my Corporation with control of 3400 gas lamps to 53 electric lamps, gas can compete with electricity both economically and on technical grounds. Improvements will take place with both. There is a need for a gas lamp of higher lumen of lighting. I have drawn up plans for improved lighting with complete new installations for eight miles of main roads for submission to my Council after the war." 1944 Journal
Middleton About 1,030 lamps are covered by an agreement for street lighting by gas entered into by the Middleton Corporation recently. The Corporation has also decided to use gas for public lighting on three new housing estates. 1938 Journal
Middleton Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Midsomer Norton A seven-year agreement for gas lighting covers the district of Midsomer Norton. The Norton-Radstock Urban Distrcit Council, who are in control of the lighting, have arranged for clock controls and automatic ignition to be fitted to all lamps. 1938 Journal
Milford (Surrey) The local authority has entered into a contract for the lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Milford Haven The Urban District Council has installed "Starlight" war-time lighting throughout the town as from the 1st August 1940. 1940 Journal
Millport Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Mirfield The Urban District Council has recently entered into two contracts for gas lighting in its area. One is for a period of 10 years and is in respect of a trunk road which is lighted by an installation of 55 12-light lamps. The second agreement covers the remainder of the Council's area and is for a term of 5 years. 1938 Journal
Mirfield "The Mirfield Urban District Council recently entered into contracts for gas lighting in their area. One is for a period of 10 years and is in respect of a trunk road which is to be illuminated by an installation of 55 12-light lamps which will replace an existing gas installation. The second argreement, which is for a period of five years covers the lamps previously lit by gas with the exception of those situate on the trunk road referred to and those in the Huddersfield-Dewsbury Road. The later road, 2½ miles in length, have previously had both gas and electric lighting, bu the Council have decided to change over to electricity on the entire length. The lighting of the portion of the road running through the centre of the shopping district of Mirfield will be by mercury dischage lamps and the remainder by ordinary gasfilled lamps. The Council have made arrangements with the Electricity Department for the continuance of all the existing electric lighting in all the new streets created under their own housing programmes." 1939 Journal
Mirfield This is a gas street lighting scheme for trunk road lighting which has qualified for an MOT grant. It will be carried out on 1½ miles of the Huddersfield-Leeds road. It lies in the area of the Mirfield Urban District Council and the installation will be installed and maintained by the Mirfield Gas Company. The new installation which will remain in commission for 10 years, consists of 56 gas lamps with 10 mantles each. The lighting units will be mounted on 25' steel columns with overhangs varying to 6' according to the width of the roadway, and will be spaced in staggered positions at intervals, giving an average spacing of 127.5'. Automatic lighting and extingushing devices, as well as manually operated controls for ARP, are to be fitted. The contribution of the Ministry Of Transport is 50% towards capital charges and annual maintenance and supervision costs. The Mirfield Gas Company is also carrying out for the Council a number of improvements in the rest of the town's street lighting. Many of the secondary roads in the Urban area, which had previously lighted by 2-light lanterns, are to be given 4-light units with refractor and reflector. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Moffat At a recent meeting of the Moffat Town Council, the Lighting Committee reported on the advisability of installing 125W mercury discharge lamps in the High street. It was shown that the installation cost would be £7 17s. per lamp and the estimated annual saving over 300W filament lamps would be £1 10s per lamp per annum. The Council approved the recommendation. 1938 Journal
Mitcham, London Installations conform to to Class F of the B.S. Specification 307. The lighting consists of 8-light, No. 2 Rochester Lamps fitted with double 12-facet wing reflectors, centrally suspended above tramway trolley wire at 25'. A spacing of 150' was adopted. Includes night photograph. 1936 Paper
Monks Fryston Under a ten-year agreemment, the Monk Fryston Parish Council are replacing the existing oil lamps in the Yorkshire village by a modern installation of gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Morden, London BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns installed along St. Helier Avenue. Advertised as the most up-to-date example of street lighting in the country and the first dual-carriage way in the greater London area to be lighted in this way. Installed by the Merton and Morden U.D.C. and completed by the County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd. It conforms with the MOT regulations. The lanterns are arranged in a double staggered formation with 400W Mercra lamps. The new mercury electric discharge street lighting installation on st. Helier Avenue, Morden, was inaugurated on the evening of Wednesday, January 19th by Councillor A. H. Gray, Chairman of the Highways Committee of Merton and Morden Urban District Council. The Chairman of the council stated that the authority had for some time felt the necessity for improving the existing lighting on St. Helier Avenue, a doulbe carriageway thoroughfare approximately one mile long extending from the Rosehill Corner at the north end of the Sutton Bypass to the roundabout at the corner of Morden Hall Road. The council waiting for the Final Report from the MOT before going ahead. The installation had been carried out by the County Of London Electric Supply Co., Ltd., in association with BTH. 47 lamp standards were provided in three rows, at each kerb side, with an overhang of 4'6" and in the centre reservation by a single row of light sources mounted in cradle type brackets. The average spacing on each carriageway is 150' and there is a mounting height of 25'. This arrangement has resulted in each carriageway being lighted independently, providing a staggered arrangement. On the bend in the road approaching Morden Hall Road, there are no lamps on the inside of the curve, two rows of lamps only being used. All the lamps are controlled by time switches and the lanterns are BTH Mercra H provided with 400W mercury electric discharge lamps burning horizontally, magnetic reflection is incorporated in the lantern. Mr. W. P. Robinson, Surveyor to Surrey County Council, commended the Merton and Morden for its enterprise in lighting this double carriageway in an efficient manner. 1938 Advert
1938 Journal
1938 Advert
1939 Advert
1944 Journal
Morden Centralised control has been installed. On Friday, July 28th at 10PM, the ceremonial inauguration of Rythmatic Control for Electric Street Lighting and National Defence Facilities took place over the network of part of the south-west area of the County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd. The equipment was installed by Automatic Telephone And Electric Company Limited and performs several very important functions. It conrols the electric street lamps along one mile of St. Helier Avenue, Morden, and enables them to be instantaneously switched "on" and "off." It is valuable in peace time, but has particular application in war time, when a swift and effective "blackout" is necessary at any momemnt. It is also linked up to several National Defence facilities, including the Fire Brigade, the notifcation of first-aid posts, and the issuing of alarm calls to council offices and air raid wardens by means of special portable units capable of being attached to any plug point. These National Defence Schemes are effective throughout Mitcham and Beddington. Control of these services and the switching of the street lamps is effected by the simple act of pressing a button. Mr. T. A. Eades (Managing Director of ATE) paid tribute to those who had made possible this first installation of equipment so vitally necessary in the defence of the nation. The system was officially inaugurated by turning on the lamps along St. Helier Avenue and which also called our units of the ARP and First Aid Services from Morden, Mitcham and Beddington, whose arrival in full "fighting kit" a minute or two later provided a dramatic finale to the evening's procedings. 1939 Journal
Morecambe And Heysham About 1,204 gas lamps are involved in a renewal of its contract for gas lighting by the Morecambe and Heysham Borough Council. Various improvemetns are specified in the new agreement. 1938 Journal
Morcambe and Hyesham Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Morecambe and Heysham Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Morecambe One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Morecombe The promenade at Morecambe is lit by 75 GEC lanterns fitted with 500W Osram lamps. These are suspended from ornamental concrete columns and brackets manufactured by Concrete Utilities. This is the famous "swan" bracket installation by Concrete Utilities. 1938 Journal
Moretonhamstead (Devon) Has signed a five year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Morley The installation was specified by The United Kingdom Gas Corporation for the local gas undertaking. A trial installation of 12 lamps was erected in 1938. It included 10-light No. 2 size mantle Alpha lamps by Foster And Pullen. The lamps were mounted on steel poles, fitted with an internal service, havd Wask raising and lowering gear, and were fitted with constant pressure governors and automatic Comet igniters. Mounting height was 25', spacing (staggered) was 140', overhang from kerb was 3'0, and the width of the road was 35'. Local opinion is extremely favourable. 1938 Paper
Morley Morley Corporation have entered into a 10-year agreement for the lighting by gas of the Old borough. About 722 lamps are in commission and schemes of new and improved lighting are being put in hand. 1939 Journal
Mosborough (York) Improvements are to be carried out in the lighting under a new two-year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
Motherwell Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed. 1939 Advert
Motherwell and Wishaw The Town Council have always carried out a progressive street lighting policy. All-night electric lighting was introduced in 1903. Just before the war, rapid progress was being made with the introduction of discharge lighting. The Town Council was one of the first authorities to introduce "Star Lighting" and now with the "Dim Out" is in the position of being able to take full advantage of the permitted relaxation, rythmatically controlled from a single point. Every main thoroughfare in the supply area was lit to the limits allowed on the first evening of the new regulations i.e. 17th September 1944. When the lights went up a considerable body of our douce, phlegmatic townspeople, who were gathered for the occasion at Motherwell Cross, actually raised a cheer. The restoration of side street lighting was tackled and the whole area was completed in less than two weeks. The number of main street lamps is 427 and side streets 3000. So marked was the effect, that the magistrates and street lighting officials had the amazing, but gratifying, experience of receiving nothing but bouquets instead of the ususal admixture containing a fair percentage of brick. 1944 Journal
Mountsorrel 254 lamps are covered by a renewal of the contract for gas lighting. 1937 Journal
Muirkirk, Ayrshire The new lighting scheme of 70 lamps recently completed comprises 19 250W mercury discharge lamps, 41 100W evening lamps and 10 100W all-night lamps. 1939 Journal
Nantwich About 252 lamps are covered by the new contract for street lighting by gas made by the Nantwich U.D.C. The term is 8-years and provision is made for improvements. 1937 Journal
Natyglo and Blaina A 5-year contract has been entered into by the Nantyglo and Blaina Urban District Council specifying gas lighting in their area. About 340 lamsp are at present in commission. 1939 Journal
Narborough Have signed a three year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Neath Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Neath Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Neath BS/ARP 37 fittings have been fitted to 18 existing columns. 1940 Journal
Neath Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Nelson Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Nelson The Street Lighting Committee has approved a scheme for extension of a modified street lighting system. About 540 gas lamps are to be converted. 1941 Journal
Netherton (Lanarkshire) The County Council of Lanarkshire have entered into a 6-year contract for public lighting by gas in Dalziel. Lamps are to be increased in number and other steps taken to improve the lighting. 1939 Journal
New Alresford New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
New Brighton, Marine Promenade REVO 1936 Advert
New Romney and Greatstoke Improvements are being carreid out under the recent 3-year agreement with the local gas undertaking. None of the 88 lamps have less than 3 mantles and directional reflectors are fitted to all lamps. 1937 Journal
Newbury The Highways Committee of the Corporation have recommended the provision of gas-illuminated bollards and overhead lamps on three street islands in the town. 1937 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne New schemes were inaugurated at Walker in the city on the 5th November which includes seven miles of main thoroughfares and fifteen miles of residential roads. 250W and 400W Osira lamps were used. GEC equipment was used with Venner time switches. The scheme replaced lanterns using 60W and 100W filament lamps. Shields Road, 40' wide: spacing 120', mounting height 24', 400W lamps, existing traction poles used. Welbeck Road and Walker Road: 400W lamps. Scrogg Road, 30' wide: spacing 150', mounting height 25', 250W lamps, new street lighting poles with 5' projection. 1936 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Number of gas lamps increased by 917 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne The Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Corporation have been conducting experiments in the night lighting of Belisa Beacons. A special gas device has been constructed by the Newcastle-Upon-Tyne And Gateshead Gas Company and some are being tested. An electric version is also being tested. Local gas undertakings have presented 30 ornamental gas standards - to light up one of the main streets - as a permanent gift to commemorate the Coronation. During the past year, 402 extra gas lamps have been installed. The total number of gas lamps in use in now 27,230. 1937 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Electric lighting appartus will been installed in all the Belisha Beacons (totalling 170). The cost is £989 with a yearly expenditure of £176 on energy. 1937 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Made up of 12 lighting authorities. A net addition of 1959 electric lamps was put into commission during 1936. Although numerically 60W lamps still preponderate for general lighting - especially in rural areas - the rare of increase of this size of lamp is rapidly diminishing; during 1936 the number of 60W lamps increased from 7645 to 8025 whilst the number of 100W lamps increased from 2731 to 3724. Mounting height has been standardised as much as possible, 15'6" being fixed for smaller wattage metal discharge lamps, and 25' for electric discharge lamps. Spacing varies from 120' to 300' according to the ability of the lighting authority to meet the expenditure. Directional reflectors continue to be used with metal filament lamps as making the best use of the available light. Approximately 87% of the lamps are controlled by time switches; all new switches being of the synchronous motor solar dial type. Where the lighting is single poles, then the underground low voltage distributors are available, and each are individually controlled. Pole mounted lamps are group controlled by an additional wire run from a control point where a time switch is situted. The larger lighting authorities are becoming aware of the uses of the BSS for purposes of specifying and comparing installations. Stress is now being laid upon the importance of road surface brightness as being a more satisfactory method of expressing the value of street lighting installations from the standpoint of visibility rather than test point illumination. Total light output is expressed in lumens rather than candle power to avoid confusion (such as mean spherical candle power, mean lower hemispherical candle power, mean zonal candle power, etc.) 1937 Journal
Newcastle-Upon-Tyne A third gas undertaking to report an increased use of gas for public lighting is that of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. The increase in the number of lamps is 773 (making a total of 28,000) and in the consumption of gas 9% compared with the figures for 1936. 1938 Journal
Newington (Sittingbourne) The Parish Council have made a seven year contract for lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Newport, Monmouth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Newport, Monmouth GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Journal
Newport, Monmouth The main road through the town has been entirely relighted. The scheme comprises 58 1000W lamps and 30 500W lamps. Average spacing 45 yards, mounting height 23'6". Non-axial asymmetric lanterns are used throughout. 1937 Journal
Newry Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Newton-In-Makerfield Sodium Electric Discharge lighting is to be provided in the electrification of 2½ miles of main road lighting. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Newton-In-Makerfield No time has been lost in carrying out the conversion of street lighting to electricity. 96 100W and 150W sodium lamps have been used on te A572 road which traverses the district - a distance of 2¾ miles. The average spacing of standards is 141 feet, and the installation conforms to the Final Report recommendations. The present scheme has cost £1,935 and has involved the displacement of 75 gas lamps. A further installation is the completion of Earlestown Market Square lighting by the privison of three posts with two lamps, two posts with single lamps and conversion of one existing post to take two lamps. 400W fluorescent mercury lamps are used, gas lighting being displaced. 1939 Journal
Newton Stewart Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
North Petherton, Somerset Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
North Petherton, Somerset Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Northallerton The Council is to submit its proposals for modified street lighting to the Ministry Of Home Security. 1940 Journal
Northampton Streets of Northampton are entirely lighted by gas. Number of lamps being just over 3000. All lamps are fitted with clock-work control. Lighting authorities now turning to gas for the illumination of traffic signs and bollards. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Northampton Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Northampton The 10 year contract entered into by the Northampton Borough Council covers 2,760 lamps. Improvements include the raising of about 300 lamps from 225 c.p. to 500 c.p., the addition of automatic control, and the increase in the height of lamps where necessary. 1936 Journal
Northampton Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Northwich Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Norwich Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Norwich GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. By 1937, 421 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. Scheme officially inaugurated in 1937 when Magpie Road installation marked the completion of the £25,000 scheme, which included 400 Osira lamps, and turned on by the Lord Mayor. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1937 Advert
1937 Journal
Norwich It is stated that a proper standard of street lighting has now been installed on every street in the city. There are now 4,397 lamps. All streets in Classes B, C and D are illuminated by 395 electric discharge lamps and the remaining streets in Classes E, F and G by means of metal filament lamps and Holophane refractors. The cost so far has been £23,797. 1937 Journal
Norwich The switching on of a new system of lighting in Magpie Road marks the completion of the City's £25,000 scheme for improved street lighting. Under the new scheme, every street in the city is now lighted by one or other class of the B.S. Specification. Norwich claims to be the first large city to install a classified standard of lighting in every one of its streets.
Class B: Central traffic crossings and circuses
Class C: Main roads and shopping thoroughfares within the city centre
Class D: Main roads from the city boundary to the city centre
Class E: Main arterial roads and suburban roads with heavy through traffic.
Class F: Residential roads with through traffic.
1937 Journal
Nottingham Sections of an electrically lighted kerb, each about 18" long, have been experimentally installed in Canning Circus. The kerbs are visible for several hundred yards from the converging roads. Each lighted section is provided with a 30W lamp and stainless-steel reflector whilst in front a length of ¼" frosted plate glass is provided. 1936 Journal
Nottingham Number of gas lamps increased by 304 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Nottingham Improvements have been made to the lighting of bus routes on which gas is used. On one thoroughfair approaching the Goose Fair, the lighting consisted of 40 lamps which have 3-light burners in square lanterns on 10'6" columns; these were replaced by 61 6-light gas lamps fitted with directional reflectors and fixed on 12'6" columns, giving a total mounting height of 15'. This is in accordance with Class F of the British Standard Specification. After 11:30PM it is reduced to one-third, which enables the Gas Department to give almost the same amount of light when traffic is at its height with very little increase in running cost over the old lighting. 1937 Journal
Nottingham The department is responsible for the lighting of 287.1 miles of streets in the city, of which 2.1 miles have been added in 1937. The mileage is: Gas 224.89 miles and electric 62.21 miles. Further progress has been made in improving the lighting in 26 streets previous to being resurfaced, necessitating the erection of 70 additional lamps. Four additional rounds are now completely controlled during the year, making the total number of gas lamps fitted with controllers 4167. 1937 Journal
Nottingham The annual report of the Nottingham Corporation Lighting Department states that gas illuminates 227 miles of streets, against 67½ miles lighted by electricity. 1939 Journal
Nottingham Stanton 6B columns and brackets have been installed. 1939 Journal
Nottingham Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Nuneaton The Electrical Engineer, Mr Gibson, has heard criticisms of some of his new sodium street lighting and is anxious to obtain the opinions of motorists, cyclists and perdestrians. Through the Nuneaton Observer, he invites people to express their opinions observing the following rules:
  • Observe curb visibility - how many lamps away can one follow the distinct edge of the curb.
  • Observe the road surface - is it evenly lit, are there pools of darkness.
  • How far distant can one see a small object such as a child, dog or cat?
These main points should be considered irrespective of the colour of the lighting.
1938 Journal
Nuneaton The Watch Committee have approved a scheme for the lighting of Lutterworth Road, east of the White Stone, by 21 65W sodium lamps at an average spacing of 150'. The capital cost of the scheme is estimated at £424 1s. 0d. and the annual running cost £7 17s. 6d. A scheme is also in hand for the lightign of the footpath from Greenmore Road to Villiers Street, which will entail the laying of 200 yards of cable at an estimated capital cost of £70 18s. 5d. 1939 Journal
Oldbury Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Oldham Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Oldham Oldham Corporation have installed 500 yards of 150W SO/H lamps, all on one side of the roadway. They have a spacing of 117' (which suggests a cut-off distribution) projection of 7', mounting height of 21' and the width of the carriageway is 27'. (Again, the narrow carriageway and excessive projection suggests a cut-off distribution). 1936 Journal
Oldham During 1937 the efficiency of the street lighting has been considerably increased, higher wattage lamps have been fixed and the burner capacity of the gas lamps increased in variou parts of the town. The candle power increase of installation is 95,086 candles. The lighting hours have been increased by 51. The main traffic routes are now fully lighted until 12 midnight, afterwards reduced to 50%. Summer reductions only apply to residential districts, and vary from 75% to 50% of full lighting. There is an installation of both mercury and sodium lamps. There has been very little adverse criticism of colour of either, but much appreciation of improved visibility. New installations are mounted 25' with 40 yards spacing; extensions are being fitted to tramway poles. Districts are being gradually converted to automatic lighting and extinguishing. 1937 Journal
Oldham The annual report of the Oldham street lighting department shows that the consumption of gas for street lighting had risen to 64,176,000 cu. ft. compared with 59,360,000 cu. ft for the previous year. During the year considerable improvements have been carried out in the lighting and it is estimated the adoption of automatic controllers, set to extingush lamps at midnight, has saved the Corporation 21,000,000 cu. ft. of gas. 1938 Journal
Oldham Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads. 1940 Journal
Oldham Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Oldham 2,300 gas and electric lamps, where the Starlight system had been adopted, now use the new Moonlight (Dim-Out) standard. There still remained the lamps that had not been used since the war began. They hoped shortly to try out the master switch in the main shopping streets in the centre of the town. When that was in operation the volume of the lighting would be improved. It was proposed to bring more lamps into use by fitting them with a metal shield. 1944 Journal
Ormskirk The installation was specified by The United Kingdom Gas Corporation for the local gas undertaking. The main traffic routes amounted to 3 miles. Gas units were installed over the last four years. The installation consists primarily of 12- and 8-light No. 2. mantle-size Maxill lamps from Parkinson. The lamps were mounted on Adastra poles, fitted with constant pressure governors and automatic Comet igniters. Mounting height was 25', spacing (staggered) 120'-150', overhang 3' with a width of road of 30'. The installation does not generally conform to the Final Report as many of the 8-light lamps are spaced at 150' reducing the rated output to below the minimum recommended (it was designed to conform with the Interim Report). A further extension to the scheme is planned. A 15-year contract was signed. 1938 Paper
1938 Journal
Oswaldtwistle The gas lighting has been improved by the Gas Department. The lamps installed give 100% more light but consume no more gas. The additional light is provided by the use of K-wing reflectors (to the side of the lamps) and by Holophane dish refractors (below the lamps). The lamps are six-mantle Rochester lamps and peak intensity has increased from 500 c.p. to 1000 c.p. 1936 Journal
Oswaldtwistle Blackburn Road is to be relit. It is proposed to install a Class "F" system for about a mile and a quarter, using six-mantle suspension lanterns with directional reflectors at 120' spacing, mounted at 20' and in a staggered formation. The total number of lamps will be 45. The scheme will be extended over a period of three years owing to the considerable expense. 1937 Journal
Oswaldtwistle Public lighting in the area controlled by the Oswarldtwistle U.D.C cost £1,720 last year as compared to £1,440 the previous year. There are 411 gas lamps in the town and they consumed 9,028,000 cubic feet of gas during the year. 1937 Journal
Oswaldtwistle Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Oxford, Banbury Road First installation of its type in the country. Over 80 specially designed GEC Oxford lanterns with 500W Osram lamps. Mounted on columns with 8 ft. projecting brackets at a mounting height of 26 ft. from lamp filament to road level and arranged for 40 yard spacing in staggered formation. A high and uniform road brightness has been achieved which is greater than that recommended by the Interim Report. 1936 Journal
Oxford During the past 12 months the Oxford Electricity Department has installed 254 new electric street lamps, representing an additional load of 38.85kW. The department is now responsible for 1457 street lamps with a total load of 381.6kW. 1939 Journal
Paddington, London Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Paddington, London The Borough Council have under consideration improvement in the lighting of certain traffic routes, havign regard to the MOT's Interim Report. All lamps in the Borough are automatically lighted and extinguished by clock controllers. 1937 Journal
Paddington, London A new type of gas lamp is to be used for the first time in London for modernising Paddington's main street ligthting. 73 Maxill lamps will be erected in Praed Road, Porchester Road, Queen's Road, Westbourne Grove, Clinton Road and Carlton Vale, and they will be mounted 120' apart and 25' high. The effect will form a bright background against which pedestrians, motor cars and other traffic will stand out clearly as silhouettes. The existing lamps will be transferred to Elgin Avenue and Sutherland Avenue to replace smaller lamps. 1937 Journal
1943 Advert
Paddington, London Improvement have recently been made to the gas lighting of various thoroughfares. The installations were erected by The Gas Light And Coke Co. to the specification and plans of Mr. W. E. Roberts, B.Sc.(Eng), M.Inst.M.& Cy.E, Borough Engineer and Surveyor, and are in accordance with the requirements of the the MOT's final report. In five main roads (Group "A") 62 10-mantle low pressure Maxill lamps by W. Parkinson & Co. have been erected on columns by the Newport And South Wales Tube Co. Ltd., spaced at 120' with a mounting height of 25'. Keith Blackman raising and lowering gear is contained in the columns and ignition is by means of Horstmann Comet igniters. One residential thoroughfare carrying heavy traffic have been similarly dealt with, involving the erection of 11 of the above mentioned columns and lanterns. Five Group "B" road shave been relit by 110 6-light burner lanterns transferred from Group "A" roads, whilst two other Group "B" thoroughfares have been relit by 42 of Sugg's 6-light uplight Rochester lamps, all units being spaced at approximately 90'. The work was carreid out under the supervision of Mr. R. A. Davis, the lighting superindendent. These improvements constitute the programme for financial year 1937/8. 1938 Journal
Paignton 150W Sodium Discharge lamps have been erected between Primley and Tweenway. 1937 Journal
Paignton The Urban District Council has recently entered into a five year agreement with the local gas undertaking for improved lighting in its area. There are at present 391 lamps in commission. 1938 Journal
Paignton There are now more than 1000 electric street lamps in the Paignton urban area, the whole length of Torquay Road being lighted by 500W filament lamps in bowl refractor lanterns mounted at 25'. On the other side of the town there are 500W sodium lamps in directional refractor fittings mounted at 25'. Tramway poles have been used for the lighting standards. Contiguous with this installation is a demonstration gas scheme utilising 12-mantle lanterns at the same mounting height, but at considerably closer spacing. Compared on a lamp-for-lamp basis, if the gas lanterns consist of 12 No. 2 mantles, a comsumption of 30 cubic feet of gas per hour is involved (.15 therms) the output being only about half that of a sodium lamp which burns 6 2/3 hours per unit. 1939 Journal
Paisley The Paisley Corporation Gas Department has been caleld upon to light Potterhill, Cardonald West and Elderslie during the current lighting season. In all about 240 gas lamps are in commission. 1939 Journal
Paisley The Chief Constable, who administers Paisley street lighting, has reported to the Lighting Committee that he has ordered 300 war-time street lighting fittings. Paisley street lighting is all electric. 1940 Journal
Paisley Following experiments made last winter, war-time street lighting has been provided in the main streets of the town, and orders have been placed for a sufficient number of fittings to extend the scheme throughout the side streets so that practically the whole town will be lighted to war-time standards. 1940 Journal
Palmer's Green Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Paynton Have installed Philips Philora lamps i.e. low-pressure sodium. 1938 Journal
Piccadily, London Lit by high-pressure gas lamps. (Includes night picture). 1936 Journal
Pembroke Dock Under a new contract, Pembroke Dock is to be lighted by gas until 1947; about 277 lamps are covered by the contract. 1938 Journal
Penge Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Penistone and Thurlestone Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Penistone Has ented into five-year contract for gas street lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Penybont The Urban District Council are trialling several different types of war-time lanterns. 1940 Journal
Peterborough It is proposed to erect 351 lamps displacing 252 existing lamps. Most of the new lamps will be of the Sodium Discharge type. Capital cost will be £8054. Recommendations of the Interim Report will be followed in all respects. 1937 Journal
Peterborough The City Council decided in February last to proceed with war-time street lighting. The installation of 287 fittings is now complete, and a further 113 fittings are now in course of erection. Extensions to the scheme are now under consideration by the City Council. 1940 Journal
Peterhead There are now 215 mercury discharge lamps in commission at Peterhead. They consist of 83 250W lamps in bowl refractor lanterns at 25' mounting height; 117 80W lamps in refractor lanterns at 11'6"; 117 80W lamps in refractor lanterns at 11'6" mounting height. In general, the lamps are staggered on both sides of the road, the 250W and 125W lamps spaced at approximately 150', that of the 80W lamps varying from 120'-150'. 1939 Journal
Pickering, Yorks A three year agreement for street lighting by gas has been arranged betweek the Pickering Urban District Council and the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Plymouth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Plymouth Plans have been prepared by the Electricity Committee for improving street lighting from St. Andrew's Cross to the beginning of Mutley Plain, and from the north end of Mutley Plain to the City boundary of Hart Street. Steel standards are to be erected to carry 500W lamps at 25' mounting height and 120' spacing. The cost is estmimated at £2500 and the installation, when completed, will comply with the recommendations for Group A of the Ministry Of Transport Final Report. 1938 Journal
Plymouth Plymouth Corporation have placed an order with the GEC for 50 steel columns and Wembley street lighting lanterns. 1939 Journal
Plymouth Union Street is being lighted in accordance with BS/ARP 37; the Town Council will consider its wider adoption when they have had time to make careful observation. 1940 Journal
Pontefract Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Pontypridd A new system of street lighting has been arranged at Pontypridd, to be completed about the middle of January, 1939. This will include the Cardiff-Merthyr Road, Nantgarw. The lighting of the dual carriageway will conform in every respect with the recommendations laid down in the Ministry Of Transport Report. GEC concrete columns, Di-fractor lanterns, and 400W Osira fluorescent lamps arrranged at 150' spacing at a mounting height of 25' from the roadway are to be installed. Each carriageway will be treated as a separate road. 1939 Journal
Pontypridd The Council has sanctioned a new system of street lighting, which will include the Cardiff-Merthyr road at Nant Garw. This is a dual carriageway road, adn the lighting will conform in every respect to teh recommendations laid down in the MOT Report. 400W mercury discharge lamsp of the fluorescent type in single piece refractor lanterns will be utilised, and will be mounted on concrete columns. Spacing will be 150' with a mounting height of 25'. Each carriageway is to be treated as a separate road. 1939 Journal
Pontypridd A trial installation of "Starlite" war-time fittings is in use. 1940 Journal
Poole, Bournemouth Road The road is lit by twelve-light Maxill Lamps. The lamps are spaced at 180', staggered with a mounting height of 24'. Includes night photograph. 1936 Paper
Poplar Methods of controlling street lighting are under review, and the General Purposes Committee are considering the adoption of proposals made by the Borough Engineer to effect more efficient control of street lamps. At the present time, the Borough street lighting is controlled from 400 separate points and the new scheme would provide for not more than 6 or 8 main control areas. The cost for the scheme would amount to £1,050 and involve the provision of 350 relay switches. The Electricity Committeee also reviewed the whole of the street lighting in the light of the Final Report recommendations. 1938 Journal
Poplar Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Poplar The Electricity Committee, which administers public lighting, and London Transport, which is to provide trolley buses, have co-operated to settle pole and lighting positions in the interests of both services. Concurrent with the change-over to trolly buses, sodium discharge lighting is to be installed along East India Dock Road and along Bow Road which is to be reconstructed with dual carriageways. The capital cost of the Public Lighting works will amount to about £10,000. Poplar street lighting is all electric, consisting of some 2000 lamps. 1939 Journal
Poplar The borough is almost only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Poplar Poplar Borough Council Electricity Committee is to purchase concrete lighting posts to replace cast-iron posts at a total cost of £2000. 1945 Journal
Port Talbot, Wales Installation carried out by the Borough Of Port Talbot Electricity Department. 400W MA/V lamps are housed in GEC Tunbridge Wells and Di-fuser lanterns. The mounting height is 25 ft. and the spacing 170 ft. 1936 Journal
Portsmouth In June 1894 the Portsmouth Electricity Supply System was started, opened by the Mayoress. After the banquet given by the Mayor in the evening, the principle guests drove around the town at 11:30 "to see the lights." The electricity supply was a sucess. There were 338,536 units sold in the first year. The original arc-lamp columns were of an ingenous type, the two side lights of a smaller candle power being lit automatically when the arc light at the top was extinguished at 11PM. There were 102 of these arc-lamps, each of 200 candle power - equal to a 150W gas-filled lamp of the present day. 1944 Journal
Portsmouth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Portsmouth GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
Portsmouth Over 50 miles of GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed throughout the city. 1937 Advert
Portsmouth During 1938, 201 filament lamps and 43 discharge lamps were installed. There are now 4863 filament lamsp and 815 discharge lamps in Portsmouth in sizes ranging from 80 to 1000W. 1939 Journal
Portsmouth In 1939, all main roads of the city were lighted by means of modern discharge lamps. Portsmouth was considered one of the best lighted provincial towns. At 31st March, 1939, there were the following public lamps in the city: (1) 831 Discharge lamps; (2) 892 Tungsten lamps (300W and 500W) and (3) 4102 Tungsten lamps (100W). Outside the city there were: (1) 35 Discharge Lamps and (2) 500 Tungsten Lamps (100W). 1944 Journal
Prestatyn About 30 additional lamps have been installed this year, the lighting of which is by gas, and the candle power of a number of existing lamps has been raised. 40 or more lamps are due to be upgraded to a higher candle power. 1937 Journal
Prestatyn The gradual replacement of all lamps of a low candle power by modern gas lamps of higher capacity is being carried out by the Prestatyn Urban District Council Gas Department. Of the 329 lamps at present in commission over half have three or more mantles. 1939 Journal
Prestatyn Prestatyn Urban District Council have entered into a further agreement for gas lighting in the streets. About 340 lamps are affected. 1939 Journal
Preston Preston is one of the first towns to install the new Siemens Sieray-Dual for street lighting (a MAT/V lamp). The installation conists of 500W Sieray-Dual lamps installed in Preston-Sieray lanterns at a spacing of 140 ft., single side lighting, mounting height 25 ft., projection over roadway 6 ft. and width of road 40 ft. 1936 Journal
Preston The main traffic routes of the town are rapidly having their illumination improved. Two or three years ago the authorities commenced tests with different types of high-power road lanterns. 1937 Journal
Preston Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
Preston Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Preston The town is improving the illumination where electricity is concerned, but relighting of side streets still served by gas will present more difficulty. It is estimated that 60% of the windows in gas lamps in the town have been broken during the war. There is difficulty getting glaziers and men to alter the lamp fittings. A new type of fitting has to be provided to take the small size of mantles permitted; it will also be necessary to get lamp-lighters. There are 3500 street lamps in Preston and about 2000 have been brought back into use. 1944 Journal
Prestwich Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Prestwych Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Pudsey Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 fittings for 20' mounting height. 1940 Journal
Pudsey Have installed BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings along all main roads and many side roads. 1940 Journal
Ramsey, Hunts 67 electric street lamps have been installed for the lighting of Ramsey. This scheme consists of 52 100W lamps, 8 150W and 7 200W. The annual cost of the scheme is £284 6s. 0d., including maintenance and lamp renewals. Reflecting equipment is used throughout, and side street lamps are mounted at 15'6" while that in the main streets are suspended between buildings or erected on columns. 1939 Journal
Ramsey, Isle-Of-Man The lighting has been the subject of a 5-year contract for gas lighting agreed recently by the Town Council. Improvements are to be made to the lighting. 1937 Journal
Ramsgate Ramsgate Town Council has decided to adopt gas as the illuminant of the new promenade. 1936 Journal
Ramsgate The Ramsgate Council has replanned the lighting of Grange Road and Margate Road. In the former road the disused tramway standards have been utilised for suspending 6-light low-pressure gas lamps over the centre of the roadway from the trolley arms. 36 lamps have been installed, each of which is fitted with automatic ignition. In Margate Road, 30 lamps of a new design, each with No. 2 mantles, have been fitted. 1938 Journal
Raunds and Stanwick Have signed a contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Rawmarsh Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Rayleigh Under a recent 5-year contract made by the Rayleigh Urban District Council a number of modern gas lamps have replaced existing lamps of a lower candle power in the main street of the village. 1939 Journal
Read and Padiham Was to be gas lit in the winter. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Reading Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Reading GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Journal
Reading 400W and 250W are being used on the main roads in refractor type fittings, the lighting being graded from the outskirts to avoid sudden transition from areas of different lighting values. 200W filament lamps are being used on secondary roads. The cost is £36,000. 1937 Journal
Reading The first lighting scheme under the Trunk Roads Act 1936 was installed after negotiations between Earley Parish Council, Berkshire County Council and the MOT. Sodium lighting was chosen which would cover a mile of the London Road through Earley to the outskirts of Reading (from London Raod to the Green Monkey). It consisted of Philora sodium lamps in ELECO GoldenRay fittings on Concrete Utilities columns. The opening ceremony on October 17th was attended by a large gathering of representatives of the highway authorities and various Associations concerned with lighting, road transport and road safety. It marked the first direct financial assistance by the Government towards securing greater road safety through trunk road lighting. The Minister Of Health sanctioned a loan of £3000 - 20 years redemption - for the improvement of street lighting. 150W sodium discharge lamps were used. 1938 Journal
1939 Advert
Reading Street lighting in Henley Road, Caversham is to be improved by Reading Borough Council at a cost of £657. 18 high-power lamps are to be erected. 1939 Journal
Reigate The Reigate Corporation have renewed their contract for the lighting of parts of the Borough by gs. 1939 Journal
Reigate The Council have decided to light all main roads (with "Starlight" lighting). 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Renfrew The GEC, in 1968, install the first motorway lighting in Scotland in the M8. Cut-off lanterns with 135W SOX lamps are used. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Repton Repton R.D.C. have entered into 7-year agreements for the lighting of Willington and Mickleover by gas. Other 7-year contracts for gas lighting have been signed in Derbyshire by the Alvaston and Boulton Parish Council, Chaddesden Parish Council, Breadsall Parish Council, Holbrook Parish Council and Sinfin and Arleston Parish Countil. The Parish Councils at Duffield, Aston-On-Trent and Darley Abbey have entered into 5-year agreements for street lighting by gas. 1937 Journal
Retford The Retford Borough Council have renewed their contract for the lighting of a part of the town by gas. Improvements are to be carreid out in the lighting which is maintained by 300 lamps. 1939 Journal
Rhondda, South Wales A limited amount of street lighting, both by gas and electricity to the Dim-Out standard allowed, has been restored. The people of the town have welcomed the restoration with acclamation. 1944 Journal
Richmond Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Richmond GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. The complete installation comprises 346 Osira lamps in GEC Tunbridge Wells lanterns. These are mounted on 25' steel columns with projecting arms of 5' to 10' towards the centre of the streets, depending on the character of the streets. The installation was carried out by the Richmond (Surrey) Electric Light And Power Company under the direction of Mr. C. Nichol. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
Ripponden The Council has accepted a tender for the provision of 22 sodium discharge lamps for the centre of Ripponden at a cost of £575. The new installation will supersede existing gas lighting in the centre of the town. 1938 Journal
Rochdale Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Rochdale Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Rochdale Mr. E. A. Stewart, Surveyor to the Urban District Council of Wardle, near Rochdale, reports that his authority have installed sodium lighting on the main road of the town. He points out that the traffic generally is of a through nature, yet district ratepayers have to pay for lighting which is mainly for the benefit of others. 1939 Journal
Rochdale Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Rochdale Rochdale has been able to take advantage of the relaxations of the extent of providing 0.2 foot candles on the main roads and most of the housing estates, thanks to the centralised control of the electric street lighting. 140 lamps in the town centre were converted from "Star Lighting" on the first night (September 11th). By the end of the week, 1100 lamps were in use, the number increasing to 1650 by the end of the month. Where star-light fittings already existed, these were readily adapted to the new standard by removing the light baffles, painting the interior white, and using 40W lamps. Other fittings had to be fitted with improvised obscuration. It is probable, however, that one is incapable after five years black-out, of envisaging standards of pre-war lighting such as were set up by our use of 150W sodium lamps. 1944 Journal
Rochester Watling Street, Stood, is to be lighted by electricity under a 10 years' agreement to be entered into by the City Council. The annual cost will be £423. 1939 Journal
Romford In 1919, the lighting was very primitve consisting of 269 lamps, some gas and some oil. 1938 Journal
Romford In 1934, there were over 1000 lamps at an annual cost of £5800. At this time the Council embarked on an ambitious scheme for lighting all main arteries and installed over 200 mercury discharge lamps lighting 5¼ miles of road to Class D of the British Standard Specification. 1938 Journal
Romford GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. The London Road (A12) is part of this scheme (includes night photograph). 400 units installed. 1935 Catalogue
1937 Journal
Romford There are 60 miles through about 300 streets. These are lighted with 1536 lamps: 1099 gas and 437 electricity. In 1934-5, the Council installed 5¼ miles of B.S.S. Class D lighting (BS 307:1931) of the mercury vapour type which has been extended. Recently a complete scheme of classification for the whole district has been adopted and a three year programme is in course of operation for the improved lighting of all the principle roads in the district.

Classifications are:

  • Class D: Main through traffic routes and principle shopping streets.
  • Class E: Principle district routes and susidiary shopping streets and potential Class D routes.
  • Class F: Principle local residential routes and potential Class E routes and major estate roads.
  • Class G: Internal residential roads and estate roads.

Outside sources provide illumination: the Romford Gas Company and the Country of London Electricity Supply Company. If costs are to be comparable and competitive it is (1) essential to extend the standard specification to local needs and provide a tender form of comprehensive layout and (2) provide a means of checking the resulting illumination both initially and in service.

Council's specification is based on B.S.S. 307:1931 with modifications to suit local conditions and advances in technique as embodied in the Intermin Report of the Departmental Committee on Street Lighting such as Gradation Units and Glare. The spacing of units on bends or curves taken from Wilson, Waldram, Damant paper [1]. Lighting up times taken from Wilson paper [2] adjusted for latitude. 25% of the lamps in the district are put into extended night lighting until sunrise.

Complete freedom is given to the competiting firms on the design of the lamp columns although future specifications will restrict the range when the economics are fully explored. An average service efficiency of 75% is to be maintained.

Illumination measurements, special conditions of contract, and the question of colour is then covered.

1937 Journal
Romford
The Urban District Council's Specification

General: Street lighting to be planned for best effect at a minimum of cost and shall comply with British Standard Specification for Street Lighting No. 307, 1931 and other supplemental conditions.

Test Point Illumination: As measured at test point: D (0.20 foot candles), E (0.10 foot candles), F (0.05 foot candles) and G (0.02 foot candles).

Mounting Height: THe height of the luminous centre of the light source above the ground shall not be less than the following: D (minimum 18', recommended 25'), E (mininum 15', recommended 21'), F (minimum 13', recommended 18-21'), G (minimum 13', recommended 15').

Space/Height Ratio: Should not be greater than the following: D (maximum 9, recommended 6), E (maximum 10, recommended 7), F (maximum 12, recommended 8), G (maximum 12, recommended 10).

Arrangement and Spacing: Average spacing for straight roadway shall not exceed 160'. The light units will be arranged in "staggered" formation, except sharp curves and roundabouts where the units should be sited on the outsides of the curves.

Spacing On Curves: The spacing of units on curves is determined by the angular displacement of light units in plan when viewed from an approaching distance. In such cases, the angular displacement of adjacent light sources viewed beyond a distance of 200 feet shall not exceed 6°

Width And Clearances: The width between rows of light units shall not exceed 30' for the space/height ratios given. If the clear height of the fitting exceeds 18' then an overhang not exceeding 5' will be permitted.

Fitting: The source of illumination shall be fully protected. The lighting unit is to be fitted with refractors or reflectors to produce an efficient and well graded light distribution on the ground surface, and unavoidable shadows shall be reduced to a minimum. The light distribution shall provide adequate illumination on elevated surfaces adjacent to the highway such as fences and buildings.

Glare: This will be reduced to a minimum. Preference will be given to refractor type fittings or refelctor types specially design to avoid casting direct images of the light source in the directions of maximum intensity. Ratio of peak candle power to the average of all values between 30°-45° from the vertical shall not exceed 6 when mounting height is greater than 18' and spacing is 150' or less. When mounting height is less than 18', then the ratio shall not exceed 4.

Standards: To be of approved design and weight and be manufactured from cast iron, steel or reinforced concrete. The weight of a cast iron column shall not be less than 3 cwts.

Reinstatement of Trenches: The contractor will be required to bear the cost of all reinstatements necessary following the execution of the works contained in this contract.

Hours Of Lighting For Lamps: Lamps will normally be extinguished at 1AM which is 2,230 lighting hours per annum. Certain lamps, pilot lamps or dual control lamps from time to time shall be lighted for an additional period. This extended night lighting contains a further 1,836 hours. Payment to cover running costs will be based on these periods.

Extended Night Lighting: In average length steets, every fourth lamp shall be put into extended night lighting in such a manner that lighted lamps are separated by three spans and are on alternative sides of the road. For shorter streets, it may be necessary to decrease this average so that each street may have at least one lamp in extended night lighting. All road junctions shall be covered.

Pilot Lamp or Dual Fittings: For extended lighting, a pilot lamp or dual control fitting shall be installed on such lamp for the purpose of ligting beyond the normal extinguishing time. Such pilot lamps shall be fixed at a height on the main standard not exceeding 18' and shall be fitted with a light source not exceeding 1,200 lumens. The fitting is to be of the symmetrical type with vitreous enamel reflector.

Gradation: In cases where streets intersect with those of higher class, the first two lamps shall be designed on the basis of the intermediate classification. Regard shall be had to colour blend in the case of electric discharge type lamps.

Tests: The installation will be taken over upon satisfactory compliance with the initial tests and the specification in general. Initial Tests and Service Tests compliance are given.

1937 Journal
Romford 87 horizontally burning mercury discharge lamps in Eastern Avenue were inaugurated. Mr. Appleby, the Deputy Surveyor, said there were 27 400W mercury lamps on the central verge, the remaining lighting being 250W. A centralised control scheme based on the ripple impulse system was demonstrated, when it was explained to the assembled company that while the apparatus controls the lighting from a central point, it might prove of considerable value with Air Raid Precautions. 1938 Journal
Romford BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Rotherham Of the 101 miles of public lighting in Rotherham 96 miles are lighted by gas and 5 by electricity, with 2238 gas and 180 electric lamps respectively. 1939 Journal
Rotherham Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Rotherham Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Rothesay Steady progress in raising the candle power of lamps and in the installation of additional lighting units is being carried out by the Royal Burgh of Rothesay Gas Department. 1939 Journal
Rothesay The Town and County Council have renewed their agreements for gas lighting in the streets of Rothsay, Ascog and Port Bannatyne. Improvements are being carried out, the general policy being to replace all the lamps of low candle power with modern units of twice the capacity. 1939 Journal
Rothesay The Council has decided to install war-time street lighting and will co-operate with the Harbour Committee in providing similar types of fittings for lighting the harbour. 1940 Journal
Rothwell Rotherwell Urban District Council Gas Department are improving the public lighting in the town which is entirely lit by gas. Lamps of a higher candle-power with reflectors of an up-to-date pattern are being gradually introduced. 1936 Journal
Rothwell The installation was specified by The United Kingdom Gas Corporation for the local gas undertaking and provided and erected by the Rothwell Urban District Council. It consisted of 3-light No. 1 size Avil square lanterns with clock controllers and bye-pass ignition; the lamps are mounted on concrete columns at a height of 14' in a staggered formation of 30 yards. Distribution was by means of a Holophane ring; the roadway was 30' wide. 1938 Paper
Rothwell A five-year agreement for the lighting of Rothwell has been entered into by the Urban District Council. ABout 860 lamps are in commission and the illuminant is gas. 1939 Journal
Ruislip, Northwood Ruislip-Northwood Urban District Council have entered into a new ten-year contract with a gas company to improve the gas street lighting in the district. Before the council made its decision tests were taken of gas and electric lighting by means of experimetnal installations. About 850 lamps are affected and they will be largely increased in number during 1936; at the same time modern lamps are replacing a number of those of older patterns. 1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Rushden The Rushden Urban District Council have entered into a contract for improved lighting. This will be gas, which will be provided by a system of centrally suspended lamps fitted with reflectors. 1937 Journal
Rushden Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Ruspidge Have signed a five year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
St. Albans ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
St. Albans Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
St. Albans Sunray fittings have been installed along Victoria Street. They are fitted with 150W Philoa sodium lamps. 1937 Advert
1939 Advert
St. Albans The North Metropolitan Electric Power Supply Company have recently converted 45 lamps for the St. Albans Rural District Council. The conversions have all been made on the Sandridge, Napsbury and Beastneys Estates. 1939 Journal
St. Austell The Urban District Council have taken on a new three-year contract with the local gas undertaking. There are 250 lamps in the area. 1937 Journal
St. Faith's and Aylsham The St. Faith's and Aylshm (Norfolk) R.D.C. have entered into a 7-year agreement with the local gas undertaking for the lighting of Sprowston and Hellesdon. About 160 lamps are being installed. 1937 Journal
St. Helens The St. Helens Corporation has made application to the Minister Of Health to borrow £15,000 for the improvement of the town's public lighting system. 1938 Journal
St. Helens The St. Helens Corporation have received the sanction of the Ministry Of Health for a loan of £5,597 for street lighting improvements. It is proposed to raise the standard of lighting during the next twelve months of over 10.35 miles. Similar work will be carried out in the two subsequent years. One of the main streets (Nutgrove Road) has already been improved with gas lighting. 4-mantle No. 2 size Foster And Pullen Arcturus suspension lanterns with stainless steel back reflectors are used; the spacing varies from between 53' and 64' on bends, to 85' on straight section of road. When the first year's work is completed no less than 521 new 4-light lamps will have been installed. The approved mounting height is 15'. The gas department will attach brackets to the existing trolley bus poles with a consequent saving in cost and a more pleasing appearance. 1939 Journal
St. Helens Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
St. Helens Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
St. Helens St. Helens Corporation is including all secondary roads in its war-time street lighting scheme. Another 1000 gas lamps are being converted. 1941 Journal
St. Helier, Jersey Have signed a new 5-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
St. Marylebone Provisional street lighting (electric) estimates for 1939-40 amount to £5000. Expenditure will be largely devoted to adjusting the standard of lighting in various thoroughfares. 1939 Journal
St. Marylebone The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
St. Marylebone Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
St. Pancras The Metropolitan Borough Council are proceeding with a scheme to improve the lighting of Euston Road with Siemens Sieray electric discharge lamps. 400W Sieray "H" Type lamps are used in Regent-Sieray lanterns. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
1939 Advert
1945 Journal
St. Pancras Following the very successful Sieray street lighting installation in Euston Road, the St. Pancras Borough Council have placed an order for a further 100 similar units to complete the lighting of Euston Road. 1937 Journal
St. Pancras Over 80 new 400W electric discharge lamps are being installed in the Euston Road between Gordon Street and Gray's Inn Road. Two lamps per standard are being installed on the road islands, and the intermediate lamps are arranged in pairs on opposite kerbs. On April 2nd, the Mayor of St. Pancras inaugurated the Euston Road lighting. 82 400W Mercury Discharge Lamps were erected on the route length of 1,050 yards. The mounting height is 25'. The broad section of the road is treated as two separate carriageways, each of which is provided with lighting in staggered formation. A further 110 sets of new equipment have been ordered. 1937 Journal
St. Pancras The Metropolitan Borough of St. Pancras has installed Siemens 400W Sieray lamps in Regent-Sieray lanterns for the lighting of Hampstead Road. 1938 Journal
St. Pancras As a result of the excellent lighting achieved by mercury discharge lamps on Euston Road, similar lighting on Hampstead Road has been installed. Excellent visibility is obtained on the whole of the carriageway. The Council also proposes to light Crogsland Road, Gloucester Road and Regent's Park Road by the installation of 125W and 250W mercury discharge lamps. The light output of the installations will be more than double that of the existing lighting, although the actual cost of energy will be considerably less. The estimated capital cost is £2,004. 1938 Journal
St. Pancras BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed along Kentish Town Road. 400W Merca lamps have been used.

1939 Advert
St. Pancras The Metropolitan Borough Council of St. Pancras have approved a ten-year programme for modernising the lighting of approximately 27 miles of streets. 1939 Journal
St. Pancras Prince Of Wales Road is lit using 400W Sieray Type "H" mercury discharge lamps in Siemens Barnet-Sieray lanterns mounted on existing trolleybus standards. 1939 Advert
St. Pancras Recently erected mercury discharge lighting has been installed along the Prince of Wales road. 400W Sieray Type H lamps are used, housed in Barnet-Sieray lanterns mounted on existing trolley bus standards. Although the roadway is very wide the distribution of light on the road surface is extremely good and the fronts of adjacent buildings are also well illuminated. The installation was carried out by the St. Pancras Borough Electricity Department, follwoing the extensive adoption of Sieray Mercury Discharge lamps in Regent-Sieray lanterns in other parts of the Borough. 1939 Journal
St. Pancras Euston Road and other main roads have been lighted (with "Starlight" lighting). 1940 Journal
St. Pancras Have installed considerable numbers of BS/ARP 37 war-time street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
St. Pancras The GEC install the world's first integral sodium lamp installation in 1956. Public Lighting, Golden Jubilee, 1974
Saffron Walden Has renewed the contract for gas street lighting for less than three years. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Salford The City of Salford has recently celebrated its centenary of incorporation as a municipal borough. The Municipal Review states: "Salford is, not unjustly perhaps, proud of the fact that it was the first town in England to use gas for the purpose of street illumination, Chapel Street being lit by a local manufacturer two years before gas was introduced for street lighting in London." 1944 Journal
Salford Considerable work has already been carried out in the modernisation of Salford's street lighting and by the Spring of 1939 it is expected that the whole of the city's gas lighting will have been brought up to date. Suspension lamps each with six mantles, have been installed on bus and tram routes; 20 miles of thoroughfares bearing heavy traffic have been given 18' and 16' standards have been used on a further 21 miles of roads (four mantle lamps have been fitted here); the remaining 130 miles of gas-lighted streets are also being equipped with modern lamps. In all there are some 6,400 gas lamps in use in Salford. 1938 Journal
Salford Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Salisbury 902 gas lamps are used for lighting the streets of Salisbury. 1937 Journal
Salisbury Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Salisbury The lighting has been the subject of considerable discussion during recent months, letters even finding a place in The Times. Some had asked for the immediate removal of the new lighting, pouring upon it the usual abuse. The results of the installation were up to expectations and generally were considered good. Barely had the new lamps been turned on than the "black out" order came. The question of improved public lighting was brought under review in 1937, when it was realised by the City Council that the existing street lighting, particularly on the main traffic routes, was wholly inadequate for modern traffic conditions. The City Engineer, Mr S. R. Little, set in motion a complete survey of the public lighting of the whole city, calling into consultation the Salisbury Electric Light And Supply Co. Ltd. who with the collaboration of Holophane Ltd, produced a comprehensive scheme based upon the requirements of the MOT's Final Report. The roads were divided into Group A and Group B; Group A included the London to Exeter trunk traffic route A30 and all classified roads; Group B comprised all the unclassified roads in the city. The scheme adopted by the Council was the lighting of all Group A roads, which has now been completed. After a thorough investigation of many systems of street lighting, including the inspection of many existing installations, it was decided to use sodium lighting, using 140W sodium lamps in Holophane 527/781 Prismatic Refractor Panel Lanterns. The choice was made because it considered to provide excellent visibility without glare, with good economy of operation. The lamps and gear were supplied by Philips Lamps Ltd. and Edison Swan Electric Co. Ltd.. The choice of columns was the subject of the most careful thought and it was decided to adopt a special modern design of reinforced concrete column by the Stanton Ironworks Co. Ltd as being most suited both to the ancient architecture; and to the more modern sections of the residential areas on the outskirts of the city. Particualr care was exercised in the siting of these columns. The average spacing adopted along the A30 was 120' despite the necessary closing in at bends, positions adjacent to railway bridges and other obstructions. This spacing provides for 5000 lumens per 100 ft. linear of roadway. In the remainder of the Group A routes 130' average spacing has been adopted giving a lumen value of 4620 lumens per 100 ft. linear. The mouting height is 25'. For the control of the system, the D.C. bias system developed by Standard Telephones And Cables Ltd. is employed. Supply to the street lamps is given from twelve transformer substations at each of which a DC Bias control panel is erected. The whole system is controlled centrally from a remote control panel at the generating station and Post Office telephone wires are used to transmit impulses from the generating system which operate the contactor panels at the substations. The layout, as planned, received the approval of the MOT without modification. 1939 Journal
Salop A new two-year contract for gas lighting entered into by the Shifnal (Salop) Parish Council provides for improvements in the lighting. 1939 Journal
Saltburn Mr. R. L. Hewling, Chief Electrical Engineer of Skelton and Brotton U.D.C. has just completed a scheme for the central control of street ligthing whereby, with the exception of a small moorland village with 47 lighting points, the whole of the street lighting can be operated simultaneously from one central point. The mileage of street lighting controled by the new system will be 23 miles and the number of lights 640. 1940 Journal
Saltburn and Marske The Salburn and Marske U.D.C. have entered into a 10-year contract for gas street ligthing. About 330 lamps are in use and improvements will be carried out. Lighting improvements are also contemplated in Redcar which is lighted by some 670 gas lamps. 1937 Journal
Saltcoats Thirty-six 4-light gas lamps with directional refelctors have been installed by the Saltcoats Town Council in a new road in the district. The lighting of Saltcoats, which is by gas, about 330 lamps being in use, is governed by a 5-year contract which expires in 1939. 1937 Journal
Saltcoats The Saltcoats Town Council have arranged a 5-year contract for the ligthing of the Burgh by gas. 1939 Journal
Sandhurst Has entered into a 7-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Scarborough Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Scarborough Electric lighting is to be installed on the newly constructed Scalby Road. Queen's Parade, Blenheim Terrace and Huntriss Row will also be lit by electricity in the near future. The Council favours 500W filament lamps, 25' mounting height, 135' spacing. The design of the lamp standards is being developed in conjunction with the Corporation Towns Development Adviser. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Scunthorpe ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Scunthorpe Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
Seaford About 345 gas lamps are covered by an 8-year contract for street lighting entered into by the Seaford Urban District Council. The lighting is to be improved by the raising of columns and by increases in candle power. 1939 Journal
Seaham Harbour Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Seaham Harbour ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Sedbergh A five-year contract for gas lighting covers the town of Sedbergh. 1939 Journal
Selkirk Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Sevenoaks Work has started on the installation in the Sevenoaks Urban area of over 170 extra gas lamps. Existing lamps are also being improved by new fittings. 1936 Journal
Shaftesbury Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Shaw, Manchester In 1965, the GEC install the first trial installation of mercury iodide lamps in the UK in Shaw, Manchester. Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Sheffield The APLE arrange fifty-one trial installations along the city's streets to test the various classes described in BS 307:1927 for suitability and glare. 1928 Conference
Sheffield Number of gas lamps increased by 475 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Sheffield 709 additional 100W lamps have been erected in new housing estates and 315 high wattage lamps are improving the lighting of main traffic routes throughout the city. The lighting meets the standard recommendation for traffic routes in the Interim Report and the requirements of BSS 307:1931 Class "D" with the exception of Queen's, Suffolk and Leadmill Roads, where the lightign is to Class "E". The improved lighting of the main traffic routes necessitated many supplementary improvements in adjoining streets. Gas lamps mechanically controlled number 15,104. Time switches numbering 361 control 8003 lamps throughout the city. 31 Radiovisor units (light actuated) control 134 illuminated guard posts and 7 500W electric lamps at important juntions. There are approximately 610 miles of streets lighted. 1937 Journal
Sheffield Had 9,241 electric street lamps in 1938. 1938 Journal
Sheffield Sheffield Corporation have placed an order with the GEC for 190 open-type non-asymmetric Wembley street lighting lanterns suitable for use with 300-500W lamps. The lanterns have copper bodies and are fitted with prismatic glass refractors and 18" diameter vitreous enamelled reflectors. 1939 Journal
Sheffield Cited as a town which could turn off all its lighting in the event of an air raid. This was put to C. W. Johnson (Under-Secretary Of State at the Home Office) during the APLE's London meeting in November 1939 to discuss the "black-out" 1940 Journal
Sheffield Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. These are for the 10' and 20' ranges. 1940 Journal
Sheffield Mr. J. F. Colquhoun, the Lighting Engineer of Sheffield, has received letters from the public indicating satisfaction with the new low-intensity lighting. 16,000 street lamps in Sheffield have been equipped with the new fittings, and the remaining 8000 will be converted in July 1940. 1940 Journal
Sheffield It is understood that considerable quantities of BS/ARP 37 fittigns for the 10' and 20' mounting height ranges are being installed. 1940 Journal
Sheffield From a letter sent by J. F. Colquhoun, Lighting Engineer of Sheffield: "I have now 25,000 street lamps in use in Sheffield. Aeriel observations were taken on the 8th, 9th and 10th October, and I have now received a copy of the Flight Lieutenant's report: 'Street lighting at Sheffield was extremely well blacked out, and great care must have been taken, as I was unable to observe an illumination from this cause.'" 1940 Journal
Sheffield ARP Lighting of the whole city was possible due to an early approval from the Council, so big orders were placed early when quick delivery was still possible. 1940 Journal
Sheffield The Lighting Engineer has expressed the view that limited tests may give the idea that "starlite" lighting is of little practical use; when, however, the lighting is installed on a large scale, the appreciation of the public is very real. This winter Sheffield will have 24,000 gas and electric lamps fitted for "starlight" lighting. 1940 Journal
Sheffield Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. Now has over 660 miles of road lit with "starlight" lanterns, second only to London, and representing 24,317 lamps. 1940 Journal
Sheffield Visitors to the city remark how fortunate they are to have "Star Lighting". Now the city has "Moon Lighting". By the end of the week (9th September 1944) all the street lights in the city should be giving "Moon Light". As there are 25,000 lamps spread over 660 miles, the work of conversion is a stupendous task. 1944 Journal
Shepshed Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Sherborne A seven-year contract for gas lighting has been entered into by the Sherborne Urban District Council for the area under the Council's control. The lighting of the town has been gradually improved during the last few years and further improvements will be carried out under the contract, which covers nearly 300 lamps. 1938 Journal
Sherringham A seven-year contract for gas for street lighting has been entered into by the Sherringham Urban District Council. Improvements are being carried out in the lighting of the chief shopping streets. 1939 Journal
Shettleston, Glasgow Have schemes controlled by Henley Sharborn Remote Control Relays. 1939 Journal
Shirebrook Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Shipley The Shipley Urban Council has approved the recommendation of the Highways and Buildings Committee of a scheme prepared by the Electrical Engineer for the improvement of street lighting for the whole of Bradford and Keighley road. This includes the installation of mercury discharge lamsp at an initial cost of £5,230 and an annual maintenance of £1,234 thus bringing Bradford Road lighting into line with the MOT Final Report. The Clerk was instructed to make application to the Minister Of Health for sanction to borrow £2,230 for the work. 1938 Journal
Shipley Shipley Urban District Council have ordered 105 GEC Di-Fractor street lighting lanterns, the mechanical features of which embody sympathetic metals of light alloy resulting in decreased weight. The lanterns are of novel construction and incorporate side arm bracket entry fixing. Specially designed for trolley bus pole mounting, they are able to withstand the maximum of vibration. 1939 Journal
Shipley Discharge lamps along the full length of the Bradford Road from Bradford boundary to Bingley boundary have been erected and placed in commission. The capital cost of the scheme amounted to £2,230, costing £1,234 per annum to maintain. The standard of lighting of the new-lighted Shipley road is of the same order as the new lighting at Bingley. 1939 Journal
Shotton (Co. Durham) Precepts for £3,000 for public lighting have been sanctioned by the parish meeting. The amount includes current £2,402, lamp replacements (mercury) £166 8s, and filament £19 10s. 1939 Journal
Shoreditch The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Shrewsbury Between 500 and 3000 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Shrewsbury Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Sidcup The South Suburban Gas Company have installed new gas lighting. 1937 Journal
Sidcup The Chislehurst And Sidcup U.D.C. have, in conjunction with the South Suburban Gas Company, erected a demonstration installation of war-time gas street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37. The installation is giving general satisfaction to the community. Three types of existing lamps have been converted with certified fittings supplied by Sugg. These include London lamps along the Main Road at 25'; Rochester lamps in Elm Road at 16'; and Windsor lamps along Hatherley Road at 12'. 1940 Journal
Sidmouth The Town Council have decided to light Connaught Gardens by gas. The initial cost is £209 and the subsequent annual cost is £71 10s. 1937 Journal
Sidmouth Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Sittingbourne Sittingbourne and Milton Urban District Council have renewed their contract for gas lighting in the streets under their control. About 214 lamps are in present installed. 1939 Journal
Skipton Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Slough GEC Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Slough Have installed the new BTH Mercra H lantern in 1937. 1937 Advert
Slough Five years is the term agreed by the Urban District Council and local gas company for lighting the 894 lamps in Slough. Two and four-mantle lamps, some of which are now being fitted with special reflectors, are in use. 1938 Journal
Slough BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Solihull Solihull Urban District Council has entered into a 7-year agreement for gas lighting over the greater part of its area. About 1,500 lamps are at present in commission, including a number of traffic bollards. 1939 Journal
South Brent (Devon) Has signed a three year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
South Shields Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
South Shields The Town Council has decided that for an experimental period of 12 months the Borough Electrical Engineer is to be responsible for all street lighting in South Shields. The intention is to enable the Electrical Engineer to bring his specialised knowledge to bear on street lighting problems. 1938 Journal
South Shields BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Southall, Norwood, London Southall-Norwood UDC Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Southall, Norwood, London Greenford Road, Southall has been relit with centrally suspended 12-light circular gas lamps fitted with reflectors. 1937 Journal
Southampton Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Southampton Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
1938 Catalogue
1938 Catalogue
Southampton, New Road After being called a "death trap" by the Southern Daily Echo, New Road is relit by Simplex Prismatic Lanterns with 250W mercury discharge lamps. The lanterns are mounted on tramway poles. 1936 Advert
Southend By 1937, 1450 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed. 1937 Advert
1937 Catalogue
Southend The lighting of Leigh Broadway has been recently improved by the installation of 16 mercury discharge lamps on traction poles at a spacing of 120'. A staggered arrangement has been obtained by using alternative poles, the mounting height being 26' with overhanging brackets. The carriagway wide is 34'. Other recent electric discharge lamp installations at Southend are at Prince Avenue, an arterial road with 22' dual carriageways, and on Western Esplanade, also with dual carriageways, the mounting height in each case being 26'. 1939 Journal
Southend-On-Sea In 1967, the GEC installed the first commercial lighting installation in the UK using high pressure sodium lamps (SON) Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974
Southport All main bus routes are now lit by centrally suspended high-power gas lamps. 18 gas-illuminated traffic guard posts have also been erected at various points in the Borough. 1936 Journal
Southport The Gas Department under J. Herbert Clegg, A.Inst.G.E. obtained the contract from the Southport Borough Council to relight the main bus routes and North Promenande. 1936 Journal
Southport The North Promenade scheme is regarded as a continuation of the existing electric lighting on the South Promenade. It is to be lit to Class E of BSS 307:1931. 37 units are installed, 18 on the shore side and 19 on the south side, in staggered formation, at 120' spacing. Height of the lamp source was 23' (so the space/height mounting level is 5:2). Columns are made in cast iron in three sections, octagonal shape and have hinged and locking door in the base. Cast iron bracket made from ¾" bore gas conduit and extends 4' from the centre line of the column. Ornamental hexagonal lanterns made from copper with white vitreous enamelled top reflector and two stainless steel directional reflectors. Each lantern is fitted with a 12-light burner made in two 6-light sections suitable for the No. 2 size mantle and provided with air and gas regulators adjustable from outsde. The bye-pass tube is made in the form of an inverted "T" with two constant burning jets being directed, one to each burner section. A constant pressure governor is secured to the main gas supply system above the lantern head. The lantern is operated by means of a distance control valve, also attached to the main supply system above the lantern. Each lantern weighs 60 lbs, so safety chains of stainless steel are attached to the cast steel hooks on the bracket. The ornamental lanterns were made by Evered & Co., Ltd. of Smethwick.(Includes daylight picture in journal.) 1936 Journal
Southport The main bus route relighting scheme uses the existing tramway standards which are spaced at 120'. Sugg Rochester 6-light lamps with dual supply are used and are fitted with two-tier type, stainless steel, directional wing reflectors with multiple facets. At the junction positions with subsidiary roads, 6-light lamps have been fited with multi-ray reflectors. Wrought iron gas service pipes have to be carried to the lamps on the outside of the columns. All bracket arms project to the centre of the carriageway, lengths varying from 8' to 16'. The mounting height of the light source is 19'6" which gives a space/height ratio of 6:2. It provides Class E lighting conforming to BSS 307:1931. 315 lamps have been used over 6 miles. Eight-light lamps have been placed in certain busy thoroughfares in the centre of the town. All lamps are fitted with constant pressure governors and Horstmann Ironclad clock controllers whic hare arranged to reduce the number of lighted mantles after 11:30PM. 1936 Journal
Southport All lighting in subsidiary roads throughout the Borough are to be improved. This necessitates the insertion of extra lighting units and the conversion of existing burners from single to 2- or 3-light type. Scheme originally planned to take 5 years, but to restrict expenditure, the period of alteration has been extended to 10 years. 1936 Journal
Southport Number of gas lamps increased by 1,062 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Southport The Southport Corporation Gas Department has recently completed a scheme for the improved lighting of Liverpool Road. The carriageway is 24' between kerbs, has footpaths of 5'6" width and has been divided into three classses under the Ministry Of Transport's Classification Scheme (not to be confused with BS 307:1931 lighting classifications). A census of all track taken on a period in October 1936 at a position in the Class 2 length of road revealed an average figure of 6000 vehicles per day. There were 31 accidents along the total length of the road in 1936. Therefore the carriageway was widened to 30' and the pavement to 13' on each side. On the Class 2 length of the road, 47 lighting units have been installed consisting of one-piece steel columns, each with a 12' fluted length, cast iron ornamental dwarf base and cast iron fluted sleeve. Overall height is 25'6" with a bracket arm with an outreach of 16' (to provide for the central lighting of the future widened thoroughfare). The bracket arm consists of a steel tube fitted with ornamental scroll and two ¾" tie rods. The ¾" bore galvanised iron service pipe is concealed within the column and is connected by means of a diminisher elbow to the steel tube comprising the bracket arm which thereby forms part of the gas circuit. The lamp columns have been erected on one side of the road only. Sugg Rochester lamps with clusters of six No. 2 mantles were used with light being distributed by a prismatic glass band and separate dish refractor. There are 24 lamps with a dual supply providing for the extinguishing of four mantles at midnight, and 23 lamps with a single supply extinguishing all the mantles at midnight, each operated by the appropiate type of Horstmann clock controller. The single and dual controlled lamps occur alternatively throughtout the lenght of the road. The mounting height of 19'6" is provided measured from the crown of the carriageway to the light source. The average spacing is 118'. A Class E lighting to the British Standard Specification for Street Lighting has been provided. (Features a day photograph which shows Sugg London lamps). 1937 Journal
Southport Originally the lighting of the Promenade was staggered. The old posts were taken down and as the bracket was detachable from the column, it was decided to erect the old columns along the centre of the road and use double arm brackets. The lanterns are decorative with raindrop glass and are fitted with 300W GLS. The footpaths were lit by decorative type lanterns fixed on ornamental columns, which are in turn on the piers of the balustrade. They are fitted with opalescent glass and are fitted with 200W GLS lamps. Electricity has proved very effective for the Promenade especially during winter time. 1938 Journal
Southport 106 miles of streets in Southport are lighted by gas, and 5.51 miles by electricity with 4,289 and 437 lamps respectively. 1939 Journal
Southport A new system of electric street lightign has been installed along the new Formby by-pass between Woodvale railway bridge and the borough boundary. The whole installation is designed in accordance with the recommendations of the MOT Final Report and consists of eight 150W sodium discharge lamps at a mounting height of 25' and an approximate spacing of 105', staggered. 1939 Journal
Southport One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Southport AEI Amberline lighting has been installed. 1960 Catalogue
Southwark, London The Borough High Street is to be lighted by 30 Supervia gas lamps which will treble the lighting efficiency. 22 of the more important side streets will also have their intensity trebled. 1936 Journal
Southwark, London Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Southwark, London There are 213 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 155 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Southwark, London Mr. D. M. Kinghorn, A.M.I.E.E., the Borough Electrical Engineer, was one of the first to realise the value of light actuated control and has been installing light-actuated control units for a number of years. (Includes picture). 1937 Journal
Southwark, London Walworth Road, New Kent Road and Newington Causeway lit by Siemens Sieray Dual (MAT) lamps on a DC supply. The Sieray-Dual Lamp has been widely adopoted throughout the UK for the excellent quality of the emitted light, its simplicity and the cheapness of the installation (as they work directly off the mains in a similar manner to filament lamps). The successful operation of the Sieray-Dual Lamp opened up the possibilities of the evolution of a similar type for use on direct current circuits and such a lamp made its debut 18 months ago. The Borough Electrical Engineer of Southwalk, Mr. D. M. Kinghorn, A.M.I.E.E., A.M.I.M.E with his D.C. supply system was not slow to investigate in conjunction with Mr. Percy Smart, M.Inst.C.E., the possibility for a trial installation. Acting on their recommendation, a trial installation of D.C. Electric Discharge Lamp in Preston-Sieray Lanterns was erected at the Elephant And Castle and in Newington Causeway. The trials proved so satisfactory that the Works Committee, being the Street Lighting Authority, made a recommendation, which was accepted and approved by the Council, for the carrying out of a comprehensive scheme of main road lighting utilising similar equipment. The following thoroughfarees have now been so lighted: Newington Causeway, Elephant And Castle, Walworth Road, Camberwell Road, Newinton Butts, Borough Hill Street and Great Dover Street. The basic spacing is 150' with a mounting height of 25' and in the main the system is staggered. In Newington Causeway, a double staggered layout has been adopted on account of the width of the road, the outer of kerb side lanterns being suspended from span wires erected from kerb to kerb. In New Kent Road, a centrally suspended system has been adopted with span wire mounting. All lanterns have been erected on raising and lowering suspension gear to facilitate servicing. The low intrinsic brilliancy of the large diffusing globes gives completley glareless lighting and the absence of high intensity beams reduces stiriation to a minimum even under wet road conditions. (Includes pictures). 1938 Journal
1938 Advert 1939 Advert
Albion Street, Southwick Albion Street is the main coast road running from the boudnary of Portslade to Kingston-on-Sea. The carriageway varies in width from 27' to 30'. The lighting installation consists of 51 BLEECO double refractor plate lanterns each equipped with a Philora 140W horizontal burning sodium lamp. The lanterns are installed on steel pillars and are fixed 25' abouve ground level and overhang the kerb by approximately 4', and are spaced at an average horizontal distance apart of 135' in staggered formation.

The layout is a normal lighting scheme strictly in accordance with the MOT Report on Street Lighting issued in 1937. The installation was erected just prior to the War and not put into operation until the lifting of the "black-out" on July 15th, 1945. When it was turned on, new 140W sodium lamps were installed and the lanterns cleaned in position.

After the lamps had been in use for one month, some 100 burning hours, a test was arranged to check the results.

The first test was to check the illumination results in appcordance with the present British Standard Specification No 307:1931 which specified the rated mean test point illumination on the carriageway. This gave a Test Point Illumination of 0.23ft. candles. This is a good Class D result.

The next series of tests was taken using the suggested "Acceptance Number" put forward by the Technical Committee ELG/5 of the B.S.I. in their redraft of the British Standard Specification For Street Lighting CH.(ELG) 1524. All the other clauses are satisfied as regards mounting, spacing, output and light distribution of lanterns to Type 1. Two series of tests were taken, each of 5 consecutive positions, one Eastward and one Westward, on different portions of the thoroughfare. The tests under review come under the 1,700 acceptance number range so the results are 41.5% higher which should be sufficiently greater to take care of service depreciation.

1945 Journal
Southwold A five year contract has been entered into at Southwold. The Council have decided to light all the year around instead of the 10 months period under the last contract. Five-light lamps have been fitted at the island junction in the main street; 4-light clusters are shortly to be fitted in the lamps on the principle main street and Parade. 1938 Journal
Stalybridge Has 561 clock-controlled gams lamps. 1937 Journal
Stalybridge Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads. 1940 Journal
Stanley The Urban District Council has instructed the Electrical Engineer to install 400 war-time street lighting fittings in the main thoroughfares. 1940 Journal
Stanstead The whole town is light by electric lighting by 1937. 1937 Advert
Staveley Sodium electric discharge lamps are to be used for the lighting of sections of main road in the Hollinwood and Duckmanton wards of the urban district. As supply becomes available in other sections of the town the system will be extended. The work is to cost about £3,500. 1939 Journal
Stepney The initial installation was the work of the Whitechapel Board Of Works, who evolved a scheme whereby 100 Crompton D.C. double carbon arc lamps were put into lighting in the areas of the Tower Of London and Whitechapel. By 1903 there were about 240 arc lamps of 15A.

Up to 1913 another 250 arc lamps were installed ranging from 6A to 10A, and included White and Flame arcs, but these were confined to secondary roads. Apart from a few small installations of Nernst and other units, side streets were still lit by gas.

In 1913, secondary street lighting by arcs was discontinued and some were removed and replaced by clusters of five 100W metal-filament lamps.

During the First World War, the majority of the lightin was removed with the arc lamp resistances. Automatic cut-outs were sold as scrap. When lighting was resumed, clusters of five 100W or 150W gas-filled lamps were installed to replace the arc lamps and the work of the attendants was minimised.

These clustered lamps were inefficient and were replaced by Croydon prismatic glass refractor fittings fitted with 300W lamps; also a few 1000W GEC Wembleys.

By the mid 1930s, big schemes were contemplated, on an alternating current mains. The schemes included the removal of many 12' cast iron gas columns and in their place tall steel tubes to be erected. 350 five-light fittings, mirror fittings etc., were to be replaced by lanterns designed for mercury vapour lamps.

1938 Journal
Stepney The borough has only electric street lighting. 1939 Journal
Stoke Newington Class "E" illumination is provided on a new installation of 52 250W mercury discharge lamps in Albion Road and Church Street. 1937 Journal
1937 Advert
Stoke Upon Trent The consumption of gas for public lighting during the year ended March 31st showed an increase of 24,002,200 or 28%. During the same period the number of lamps rose to 6,032. 1938 Journal
Stourbridge Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Stourport The quotation of the Stourport Gas COmpany (£526 a year for 239 lamps) has been accepted for public lighting in the district during the next five years. 1939 Journal
Strathmiglo, Fife Have schemes controlled by Henley Sharborn Remote Control Relays. 1939 Journal
Strechford A modern Class "D" installation is of particular interest as it is one of the first roads in the North to be constructed with cycle tracks. A staggered system of lighting is used employing twelve-light No.2 Sugg London lamps. mounted at 22' to mantles, spaced at 120-130'. The overhang from the kerb is 6'3". The lamps stand in the centre of a 4'6" gras verge which separates the 30' carriage way from the 9' cycle tracks. A further 4'6" verge separates the cycle tracks from the 7'6" footpaths. The footpaths are cement slabs, the cycle tracks are pink coloured concrete and the carriage way is large tarred granite chips. Includes day photograph and night photographs. 1936 Paper
Stretford Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Stretford A scheme costing £12,000 has been adopted for lighting all the main roads in Stretford by mercury discharge lamps. Dangerous crossings and corners are to be lit by sodium lamps. 500 new lamps, at around 105' spacing, with 6' overhang, will be used. 1937 Journal
Stretford Five hundred new lamps costing £12,000 have been approved for lighting Stretford main road by mercury discharge lamps. Sodium lamps will be used at certain dangerous crossings and corners. 1937 Journal
Stretford The Stretford Electricity Board, as a result of the demonstrations at Folkestone for the 1937 APLE Conference, of the GEC cut-off lanterns without the use of magnetic deflectors, have adopted a similar method of lighting in Kings Road, Stretford. This is an important thoroughfare 36' wide, and the 250W Osira lamp units are installed at 105' spacing with a mounting height of 25'. The lanterns are suspended from projection arms having a 9' overhang from the kerb towards the centre of the roadway. The spacing recommended by the GEC was 90' but the wider spacing adopted at Stretford provides a high standard of road brightness which meets withthe requirements of the Corporation Surveyor's Department. 1938 Journal
Stretford A modified street lighting scheme, at a cost of £1,700 has been approved by the Stretford Street Lighting Committee. 1940 Journal
Stroud The Gas Light And Coke Compnay have provided over 200 new adaptions from "Star Light" to "Moon Light" both within the Urban Area of Stroud and certain parishes within the vicinity. The public are well pleased with the new lighting. 1944 Journal
Stockport Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Stockport New electric standards have been erected. The Borough Surveyor has also been instructed to prepare a report and to estimate the cost of converting the whole of the lighting in main roads to electricity. All new estates are to be lighted by electricity. 1937 Journal
Stockton Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Stockton ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Stockton-On-Tees The Stockton-On-Tees Corporation have received notification from the Ministry Of Transport thata grant will be made of the 50% of the capital and maintenance costs of a modern installation of gas lamps for an important main trunk road - A67, A19 and A176 running through the town. The contract is for ten years. The insallation will consist of 111 twelve-light gas lamps, fitted with automatic controllers and Comet igniters. The lamps will have a mounting height of 25' and are spaced at 120'. The lamp overhang has been so arranged as to give uniform width between lamps of 30'. A portion of the lighting is now completed and has resulted in many favourable comments. An interesting feature of the scheme is that the whole of the surface of the road is being relaid in varying road materials, and an opportunity of comparison of their mertis in assisting good silhouette vision will be provided. 1939 Journal
Stoke-Under-Ham Is to be lighted by gas for the next 7 years under a new contract, which specifies various improvements. 1937 Journal
Stratford King's Road, Stratford, an important thoroughfare, 36' wide, is being lighted by the provision of 250W horizontal mercury discharge lamps, spaced at 105', with a mounting height of 25'. The lamps will be erected with an overhang of 9 feet from the kerb. 1938 Journal
Stratford-On-Avon Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. Curved arms of a type specially designed for use in the town, mounted on 25½' concrete pillars carrying new suspended gas lamps have been installed in the main thoroughfares. The lanterns are twelve-light No. 2 "C" pattern Sugg Londons are of 3000 c.p. The mounting height is 22'6" to mantles and the spacing is 150'-165' with bracket overhang of 5'6". Day and night photographs are included along with an iso-foot-candle diagram. The lighting conforms with the MOT's Interim report. There are plans to extend the scheme. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
1936 Paper
Stratford-On-Avon Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Stretford Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Sunderland Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed.

1937 Advert
1938 Catalogue
Sunderland Some 938 lamps are affected by a recent contract specifying gas lighting entered into by the Sunderland Corporation. Improvements in the ligthing are to be carried out. 1938 Journal
Sunderland The ARP Committee have arranged for a demonstration of centralised control equipment which will be utilised to control street lighting throughout the town and 12 "alarm" and "all-clear" sirens. The comprehensive service is a development of the street lighting remote control system which is already in operaiton in connection with the lighting on the Plains Farm Housing Estate. If the Corporation approve the installation, which would simultaneously operate the whole of Sunderland's 4000 electric street lamps, it will be the largest scheme in operation in the country. 1939 Journal
Sutton, Surrey Experiments with war-time street lighting are being made in Mulgrave Road and the Council will decide its future policy after making appropriate observations. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Swadlincote Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Swanage The whole of the town is lit by gas. Various improvements are being carried out: new lamps are fitted with reflectors and of the latest type. Older units are gradually being replaced. 1936 Journal
Swansea The Council contemplate the total expenditure of £20,000 on improved street lighting. It is proposed to use sodium discharge lamps on all main route thoroughfares. 1937 Journal
Swansea Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Swansea AEI Amberline lighting has been installed. 1960 Catalogue
Swillington (York) Is to have a system of public lighting by gas, for which an agreement for a term of three years has been entered into. 1939 Journal
Swindon Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Swineshead Yearly income of the Charity Of John Butler / Causeway Charity shall be applied by the Trustees in or towards defraying the cost of lighting roads dedicated for the user of the public or of the highways in the ancient Parish of Swineshead. 1944 Journal
Swinton Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Taunton The General Purpose Committee has been authorised to provide mercury discharge lighting in the main streets of the town. 1937 Journal
Teignmouth Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Tewkesbury The Borough Council have renewed their agreement with the local gas undertaking for street lighting in the district.. 1939 Journal
Tewkesbury The MOT have agreed with Glouestershire County Cuoncil as the delegated authority and Tewkesbury Borough Council as the Lighting Authority upon the exact lighting of 2.7 miles of the A38 from Gubshill to Muthe Hill. The MOT will be meeting 50% of the capital and maintenance charges in accordance with the Trunk Roads Act 1936 and their Circular No. 511. The installation will be carried out by the Cheltenham and District Gas Company and will consist of eighty-two 12-light gas lamps mounted upon concrete columns at 25'. The lamps will be sited strictly in accordance with the recommendations contained in the Final Report of the MOT Departmental Committee on Street Lighting. Normally the lamps will be staggered around bends. Central lamps will be utilised in wide parts of the carriageway. The new installation will replace 23 existing gas lamps and 16 150W overhead electric suspension lamps. The new five year contract between the Tewkesbury Borough Council and the Cheltenham And District Gas Company will also involve the installation of nine 4-light suspension gas lamps on concrete columns mounted at 14'6" in place of six existing 150W electric lamps; also the purchase by the Council from the Gas Company of 97 existing gas lamps in subsidiary streets and the erection of 14 extra gas lamps in place of 14 existing 75W electric lamps. When completed the whole of the Borough will be lighted by gas, the complete installation consisting of 82 12-mantle, nine 4-mantle and 111 3 or 2-mantle lamps, all owned by the Council. 1940 Journal
Thornaby Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Thrapston Has entered into a three-year contract for gas street lighting. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Thurlestone Have entered into a five-year contract for gas street lightign. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Tipperary New contract for public lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Tipton Installations include suspension lamps fitted with directional reflectors to Class F of the B.S. Specification 307. The lighting consists of 5-light, No. 2 Stechford Lamps fitted with 12-facet wing reflectors and AH Mor-lite reflectors. They are mounted at 18' and staggered spacing of 120' with an overhang of 4'. Includes day and night photograph and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Tiverton In March 1936, the Council approved a scheme for lighting the main streets of the town by electricity instead of gas, and it was then estimated that the cost of providing suitable lamps and brackets would amount to £500. Owing to the recommendation of the MOT Final Report it is now found advisable to change the system to mercury discharge lighting at an estimated cost of £1,108. The Council has adopted the Lighting Committee's recommendations and application is being made to borrow £1,125 for this purpose. 1938 Journal
Todmorden New lighting has been installed on Halifax Raod. 150W sodium discharge lamps are used on steel poles, giving a mounting height of 25'. 1938 Journal
Tolton, Southampton The West Hampshire Electricity Co. has recently obtained a contrct to erect 226 100W lamps in the town. Reflector lanterns will be used, mounted at a height of 15'. 1939 Journal
Tomintoul, Scotland The road leading to Tomintoul, the highest village in Scotland, has been lit with GEC lighting columns equipped with small Oxford lanterns burning OSIRA electic discharge lamps.

1938 Journal
Tonbridge Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Torquay Up-to-date gas lighting has taken the place of electricity in the market of Torquay. The 18 new lamps are of the 24-mantle type, spaced at about 30' apart, at a height of 12'. This installation is expected to save about £40 per year. 1937 Journal
Torquay From a report presented to the Torquay Town Council presented by the borough engineer (Mr. P. W. Ladmore) who stated that on March 31st, 2553 public lamps were in commission. Only 9 were gas lamps. Of the electric lamps, 1769 were hand operated, which were divided into 27 districts, each in the charge of a lamplighter. Lamps were burned all night except for about 20 of the most powerful, which were extinguished at midnight, leaving at these points on the pilot lamps. Following the introduction of mercury vapour lamps in Newton Road, Mr Ladmore suggested that the policy might be adopted of extending this type of lighting through all the main roads in the town away from the sea front. In shopping streets the luminescent lamp could be used. Several experimental lanterns had been fitted along a portion of Ilsham Road, among them being two 150W mercury vapour lamps. It was suggested that this type of lantern should be adopted in the future for the minor main roads. A new 80W mercury vapour lamp was being tried out in connection with a new installation in Cadewell Crescent. It was anticipated that it would be more efficient than the old gas filled type. If this were the case, it was suggested it could be adopted for future side street lighting. Lamps were spaced at 60' - this was to be reduced to 40' in accordance with the MOT Report. While pilot lamps were decorative they were not efficient illuminants and no more were to be ordered. He recommended that the principle of reducing main road street lighting by extinguishing 50% of the lamps from midnight or 1AM should be extended. 1939 Journal
Torquay One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Torquay Has installed 500 A.R.P. street lighting fittings. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Totnes A seven year contract for gas lighting has been entered into by the Borough Of Totnes. 1938 Journal
Tottenham, London High pressure gas lighting installed by Sugg which included a gas-heated hot air engine to drive the gas compressor. a gas 1937 Paper
Tottenham, London Lighting improved by raising mounting height with extensions pieces and fitting 3-light No 1. alignment burners with "Multi-Ray" reflectors in Sugg Windsor lamps. Staggered installation with 13' mounting height and 130' spacing. Conforms to Class G of the B.S. Specification 307. Part of a survey of modern gas street lighting installations for a conference paper. Includes night photograph and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Tottenham, London An example of a close spacing and low mounting height installation (as opposed to a wide spacing and high mounting height). The installation is a generous Class F of the B.S. Specification 307. The lighting consists of 6-light, No. 2 Rochester Lamps with mantles in staggered formation, fitted with single 12-facet side reflectors and Multi-Ray reflectors below the mantles. The mounting height is 14'6" and the spacing 100' in a staggered formation. Includes night photograph. 1936 Paper
Tottenham, London It was announced at the annual general meeting of the Tottenham and District Gas Company that all gas street lamps in the area would shortly be fitted with an automatic lighting device which would obviate the necessity for a by-pass. There are 10,706 publc lamps lighted by gas, an increase of 288 over the previous year. 1938 Journal
Tottenham, London The number of lamps in lighting in the new areas at the dates on which the Tottehnham Company assumed control was 1,375, the total candle power amounting to 258,986. The number of lamps in lighting on 31st March, 1938, was 1,770, an increase of 395, the total candle power being 442,442. The number of public lamps in the Parent Area has increased from 6,567 in 1928 to 9,007 in 1938 an increase of 2,440; while the candle power of these lamps during the same period increased from 1,054,430 to 2,137,736. 1938 Journal
Tralee Tralee Urban District Council have accepted the tender of the Electricity Supply Board for the public lighting of the town with 17 lamps at £722 per annum. Electric lamps have already replaced gas lamps in most of the streets. 1939 Journal
Treharris Improvements are being carried out int he lighting of part of Treharris under a new three-year contract for gas lighting entered into by the Merthr Tydvil Corporation. 1939 Journal
Troon The Town Council has entered into an agreement with Ayrshire Electricity Board for lighting the streets of the Burgh by electricity. The capital cost is £3200 and will be spread over four years. 1937 Journal
Troon As a result of experiments in which part of the business area of the town was lighted by electricity, the Troon Town Council has decided to extend the scheme to other parts of the burgh. Having accepted a tender of £3,937 10s. for lighting equipment on classified roads and bus routes, and for £1,016 2s. 6d. for installation work on subsidiary roads, the work is to be placed in hand immediately. 1938 Journal
Truro The City Council have signed a seven-year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1937 Journal
Tunbridge Wells Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Tunbridge Wells GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
1936 Journal
Twickenham First Unidirectional installation on the Great Chertsey Road. 125W Osira lamps are installed in GEC Unidirectional lanterns. A new system of street lighting for double-carriageway roads has been installed on the Great Chertsey Road, Twickenham. It is the outcome of experiments by the GEC at Wembley. It reduces running costs by 60% without entailing any sacrifice in efficiency. Ordinary installations using 400W lamps can be carried out under the new method with 125W lamps; similarly 250W lamps can be replaced by 80W. This leads to a saving of £350 per mile. Research has shwon that light is required only in one direction - opposing the traffic flow - on each carriageway of a dual road. It gives improved revealing power by accentuating contrasts of obstacles on the roadway, and driving comfort is increased as the only light sources to be seen are on the driver's own carriageway. The Uniway lantern is the first lantern on the market for dual-carriageway roads. It is designed for Osira 80-125W mercury vapour lamps. The whole of the light is refelcted in one direction - towards oncoming traffic - and an extremely event "flash" is obtained as a result of special diffusing glass. 1939 Journal
1939 Journal
1940 Journal
1944 Journal


Twyford Has entered into a 3-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Tynemouth Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Tynemouth 75% of electric lamps and 60% gas lamps have been overhauled and 768 lamp pillars have been repainted. There are 1480 electric lamps and 1440 gas lamps on the main roads in the borough, but main in the back streets have not been touched. At the present time, clocks are being put back on the lamps in the main roads and the Mayor's lamps are ready to be lit at very short notice. Two estates in the Borough comprising some 506 electric lamps are on the impulse system. A considerable number of lamp fittings are in stock, available for immediate use when permission is granted for street lighting to be switched on. 60% of the lamps in the borough have been renumbered by stencil painting. Now that the restriction on street lighting is partly lifted it is proposed to light every alternate lamp on the main bus routes and when this is completed to light the intermediate ones to the standard laid down. 1944 Journal
Tyneside Towns A Conference of Local Authorities convened by the Mayor Of Gateshead, Alderman P. S. Hancock, on August 23rd 1940, decided to press the Government to sanction the installation of war-time street lighting in the Tyneside area. Although Sir John Anderson stated in the House that is was not possible for lighting to be permitted in this area owing to its proximity to the coast, a very strong point made at the meeting was that as war-time street lighting in its limited form, and properly installed, was reputed to be invisible from the air, the Government should allow this form of lighting to be installed. 1940 Journal
Tyldesley Has ordered between 100 and 499 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Urmstron Progress has been made by the Urban District Council with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads. 1940 Journal
Usk A three-year agreement for gas lighting has been entered into by the Usk Urban District Council. 1939 Journal
Uxbridge Uxbridge Urban District Council has entered into a 5-year agreement for gas lighting in Uxbridge, Hillingdon and Cowley. About 674 lamps are affected by the new contract and various lighting improvements are contemplated. 1939 Journal
Vauxhall, Old Vauxhall Bridge The Old Vauxhall Bridge is lit by Scott-Snell lamps. Probably in the 1890s. 1937 Paper
Victoria Embankment, London Number of night accidents involving vehicles reduced, following relighting of the thoroughfare, by 31% during the six summer months and 81% during the six winter months. 1945 Journal
Wakefield There are 1347 electic and 1411 gas lamps in the city covering 87 miles of streets. The automatic installations are not generally applied to gas lamps, but the 16 recently taken over from the Stanley U.D.C. were fitted with clocks and were working quite satisfactorily. With regard to electric lamps there are three systems of automatic control in operation: (1) Time switch on standard; (2) Time switch in sub-station; (3) Time switche in kiosks or section pillars. The department has kept pace with the ever-increasing housing estates and the lighting is planned at an average distance of 50 yards, with particular attention being given to the road junctions. The lamps are arranged in staggered formation, which is more costly than one-sided lighting, but has its compensating benefits. Improvemetns have been made during the year to main road lighting. Kirkgate has been redesigned utilising the disused tramway poles. 300W lamps have been placed on these poles with Bi-Multi reflectors. These reflectors are of the two-way type except at the road junctions where three-way reflectors have been used. The new system of gas lighting, which consists of a greater mounting height and the use of a three-mantle lateral burner and directional reflectosr has been applied to Denby Dale Road, Bradford Road and Teall Street. 1937 Journal
Walker By 1937, 251 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed 1937 Advert
Wallasey Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
Wallasey Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along the main roads. 1940 Journal
Wallasey Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Wallington Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Walsall Lichfiled Street is now lit by electric lighting. 1937 Advert
Walsall Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed. Avenue 4D columns with 5 Ft. Brackets fitted with BTH Diren lanterns are installed on the main roads.

1937 Advert
1938 Catalogue
1939 Journal
Walsall Concrete Utilities columns and brackets have been installed. Avenue Square columns with Double 4 Ft. Brackets are installed.

1938 Catalogue
Walsall The widened Birmingham Road from the Great Barr side of the Bell Inn to the Borough Boundary, and Bradford Street, are to be lit by mercury discharge lamps similar to those installed on Bell Lane and Delves Green Road. 1938 Journal
Wallsend The Wallsend Town Council have authorised for the gas lighting to be modernised. A ten year contract has been made with the Newcastle-Upon-Tyne And Gateshead Gas Company. 1937 Journal
Walthamstow, London ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Walthamstow, London Concrete Utilities concrete columns and brackets have been installed. 1938 Catalogue
1939 Journal
Walton-On-Thames Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Wanstead and Woodford Have entered into a 7 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Wanstead and Woodford The Borough has installed 34 twelve-light gas lamps, 32 of which are on sixteen double-arm columns, to light a portion of Woodford Avenue which is part of the Southen Arterial Road. The contract is for a period of five years. 1938 Journal
Wanstead and Woodford A gas installation has been erected for the Wanstead And Woodford Borough Council at Southend Road, Woodford by the Gas Light And Coke Company. The portion involved has been reconstructed with 16' centre verge, two 30' carriageways, cycle tracks and footpaths, so the total width is 100'. It was not possible to erect columns on the outer verges owing to the strips separating the carriageways and cycle tracks being very narrow. All lamps had to be mounted on the centre verge, and that section included a long bend. Steel columns from the Bromford Tube Company were erected at 140-150' intervals, each fitted with two bracket arms giving a total span of 20', so than the lamps overhange each carriageway by about 2' and the height to the mantles was 25'. The lighting unit was the London B/2 12-mantle lamp by Sugg which had an output of 6000 lumens over a very wide horizontal angle, and this distribution enabled good visibility to be provided on the extremes of the footpath. Speeds of over 70 miles an hour were reported as quite safe using side lights only. The lamps were fitted with Keith Blackman raising and lowering gear, and control is by Newbridge 3A/UNI Controllers fixed in the bases of the columns in conjuction with Comet Igniters. 1939 Journal
Wandsworth, London Lighting achieved by four No. 1 burners in cluster formation in a Rochester Lamp with Holophane band and dish refractors. Mounted at 14'9" to mantles and spaced 145'-150' apart. To Class G of the B.S. Specification 307. Part of a survey of modern gas street lighting installations for a conference paper. Includes day and night photographs and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Wandsworth, London One of the more important roads in the borough. Lighting achieved by five No. 2 burners in cluster formation in a Rochester Lamp with Holophane band and dish refractors. Mounted at 21'6" to mantles and spaced 145' apart. To Class F of the B.S. Specification 307. Part of a survey of modern gas street lighting installations for a conference paper. Includes day and night photographs and iso-foot-candle diagram. 1936 Paper
Wandsworth, London All roads to be relit by the South Metropolitan Gas Company who have successfully lit 106 miles for many years, and were successful in tendering, resulting in a five year contract. The necessity of relighting on such a large scale was prompted by the huge increase in speed and volume of traffic. (Note that there's also an early reference to "rat-running" and the requirements for some side-streets to be better lit: "A further compilation is caused, especially in London and large towns, by motorists who, in order to avoid the numerous Belisha crossings and traffic lights which they encounter in the main roads, devise short cuts and bypasses in the side streets.") It will be the first borough to include a large area illuminated entirely by Supervia lamps. Main roads (16 miles) were lit to a Class "E" standard (BS 307:1931) and high-pressure Supervia lamps were used, although consideration was also given to the MOT Interim Report on Street Lighting and its mounting height, spacing and overhang were all adopted: lamps mounted at 25' on gibbet arms with an overhang of 6' and spaced at 150'. In order to facilitate maintenance, raising and lowering gears were incorporated in the installation. Remaining roads were divided into two classes: the first being principle secondary roads or important residential roads and were lighted to Class "F" with low pressure Supervia lamps (with two strip mantles) mounted at 18'6" with an overhang of 4'6" and are arranged in staggered formation with 150' spacing and fitted with internal raising and lowering gear; the second being all other roads being lighted to Class "G" by means of a smaller Supervia lamp (with one strip mantle) mounted at 14'6" and spaced 150' apart. Spacings are decreased at junctions, corners and places where lighting joins another of a higher grade. (Includes pictures of Class "E" and Class "F" lighting columns). About 5000 modern gas lamps will be installed. 1936 Journal
1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Wandsworth, London Number of gas lamps increased by 317 from 1935 to 1936. 1937 Journal
Wandsworth, London There are 615 high pressure gas lamps installed in the borough of which 615 are South Metropolitan Gas Company Metro Supervia lamps. This is part of South Metropolitan Gas Company's high pressure gas main in South London. 1937 Paper
Wandsworth, London GEC claim to have lit a big proportion of the main and some of the side streets. 1937 Catalogue
Wandsworth The Borough Council has decided to install lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 for next winter at a capital cost of £9,473, which will be spread over five years. The decision to provide the lighting was carried by a majority of two, and the Chairman of the Lighting Sub-Committee indicated that their recommendation had not been at all hasty, and that a great deal of useful information has been obtained as a result of trial installations. To reinstate normal lighting after the war would cost the Borough £2000. 1940 Journal
Ware Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Ware Tall columns to 25' have been supplied by Concrete Utilities. 1936 Advert
Wargrave Has entered into a 3-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Warrington Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Warrington 163 units of WASK Up And Down Suspension Gear have been installed on gas lighting columns. 1933 Advert
Warwick The Corporation have extended the number of gas lamps in commission over the last two years. There are now 344, 234 are clock controlled. 1937 Journal
Warwick Improvements in the lighting of Warwick are to be put in hand as a result of a new agreement with the local gas undertaking. About 373 lamps are covered by this contract which is for a period of seven years from April 1st, 1938, instead of the usual five. 1938 Journal
Warwick Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Watford Have installed Concrete Utilities columns. 1937 Advert
1938 Catalogue
Watford The Rural District Council are installing ELECO columns, bracktes and lanterns. 1965 Catalogue
Wedmore The new contract for gas lighting in Wedmore is in respect of 50 2-light clock-controlled lamps fitted with multi-ray reflectors. 1936 Journal
Wedmore Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Wellingborough Between 100 and 500 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Wellington The street lighting contract between the Wellington Urban District Council and the local gas undertaking has been renewed for a period of five years. The agreemetns covers 335 lamps. 1938 Journal
Welshpool Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Wembley Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Wembley, East Lane, London The GEC unveil their new mercury vapour discharge lamp (the MA) along East Lane, Wembley on the 22nd June 1932. It is the first street lighting trial of a discharge lamp. The road, which fronted the research labs, was being used as a showcase for the GEC’s various street lighting schemes and was populated with a bewildering range of functional and decorative lanterns. These were all fitted with the new lamps before the big switch-on to an invited crowd of delegates. 1935 Catalogue
Wembley, East Lane, London The GEC arrange the first installation of high pressure sodium lamps (SON) in the UK along East Lane, Wembley. [Golden Jubilee, Public Lighting, 1974]
Wembley, Watford Road, London The first installation of the mercury vapour discharce lamp (the MA) is inaugurated on the 2nd March 1933. 46 GEC Watford lanterns are installed along the road. It is officially opened by Captain J.M.Donaldson, the North Metropolitan Electric Supply Company and the Wembley Urban District Council. The wider spacing used started to usher in the conscious idea of high road brightness - moving away from high object brightness. "This was my personal view when collaborating with the GEC on the first installation of the new lamps in Watford Road in 1933 - on the basis of the wider spacing it was practicable to push up the mounting height without unduly increasing the total first cost of the installation. The Watford lantern was particularly designed to avoid glare and give a good road brightness and that installation remains practically unaltered to this day. - Gregory, 1940 (published 1944). 1935 Catalogue
1940 Journal
1944 Journal


Wembley, London GEC Osira lamps in GEC lanterns have been installed. 1936 Advert
Wembley, London Have entered into a 5 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
1936 Advert
Wembley, London 300 BTH Dilen lamps burning 400W MA lamps have been installed on Fryent Road, Bridgewater Road, Park Lane, Salmon Street and Harrow Road. Wiring and connections are by the The North Metropolitan Electric Supply Company. Harrow Road, Wembley is lit by 130 250W BTH Mercra lamps spaced at 120' in staggered formation, mounted 25' above road level on brackets attached to trolley-bus poles, to Class E. (Includes day and night pictures). 1937 Advert
1937 Journal
West Alvington (Devon) Has signed a four year contract for gas lighting. 1939 Journal
West Bridgford Considerable appreciative comment has been roused by the vast improvement of the lighting in Bridgford Road by the installation of 23 150W and six 65W Sodium Discharge lamps. 1937 Journal
West Bridgford Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
West Bridgeford Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
West Bromwich The Highway Committee has chosen gas for lighting two main routes through West Bromwich being Carters Green to Wednesbury Boundary and Carters Green to Tipton Boundary. It was decided to install along the two and a half miles of main road 141 6-light lamps at mounting heights of 25'. The three arterial roads in West Bromwich thus continue to be gas lighted. 1938 Journal
West Ham, London After the satisfactory results obtained from the installation of three experimental schemes in 1935, the Corporation has approved the installation of 689 400W MA lamps in 14 miles of streets (the BTH Dilen lantern). The new lighting will be installed simultaneously with the conversion of the tramway routes to trolley-bus operation as the existing standards which in general carry the street lighting brackets will have to be changed. On the completion of this work there will be 780 electric discharge lamps in the Borough. 1936 Journal
1937 Advert
West Ham An additional mile of main highway in West Ham is shortly to be lighted by 400W mercury discharge lamps in bowl refractor lanterns. Advantage is being taken of the trolley bus poles which have recently been erected and the lightign equipment will be supported on extension bracket arms. At the present time, 20 miles are road are lighted by mercury discharge of which 16 is carried out with 400W lamps and 4 with 250W lamps. 1939 Journal
West Ham War-time street lighting is in commission on most main roads. 1940 Journal
Westminster, Parliament Street, London Parliament Street is lit by Scott-Snell lamps. Probably in the 1890s. 1937 Paper
Westminster, London Main streets have all been lit with the Keith & Blackman City high-pressure gas lanterns in 1911. Installed and maintained by the Gas Light and Coke Company. 1937 Paper
Westminster, London Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. One of the seven important London authorities to sign a 15 year contract since 1932. 1936 Advert
1937 Advert
Westminster, London The City Council have accepted an offer of the Gas Light and Coke Company to increase the illumination in Parliament Square for four weeks round the date of the Coronation. 1937 Journal
Westminster, London The Gas Light And Coke Company report that the number of public lamps in Westminster has increased by 1000 during 1936, the annual consumption is 20 million cubic feet. 1937 Journal
Westminster, London Required conversion of existing gas lanterns to war-time BS/ARP 37 in 10 days. Standard gas fittings for the specification had yet to be made, and Sugg (working closely with the B.S.I.) managed to design, certify and installing the fittings in the required time. This probably took place between December and January 1940.

Faced by an official request for an immediate large-scale installation in Westminster, it was necessary to re-design completely for the new source and produce some hundreds of fittings suitable for converting both high and low pressure gas lamps within a period of ten days. The method adopted was to put into immediate production the main parts of the fittings: the auxiliary burner, reflector and bottom cup and to erect these in lanterns existing in the streets. Meanwhile, the laboratory staff, working in shifts, devised the slotted masks which primarily controlled the light output for the three mounting heights, the slots being cut out by milling overnight and the resulting masks, with various numbers and sizes of slot, tested the following day. When the sizes of slot had been determined, formed tools for punching these were used. The production model masks were then retested, approval sought for the resultant polar distribution and the bulk production started, the masks being inserted into the previously erected fittings. Only true co-operation between the various bodies concerned, especially the B.S.I. and the Public Lighting Department of the G.L.C.C. enabeld this installation to be effecteed by the specified time limit.

1940 Journal
Westminster, London Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Weston-Super-Mare 226 units of WASK Up And Down Suspension Gear have been installed on gas lighting columns. 1933 Advert
Weston-Super-Mare The town has 1381 gas street lamps. Of these, 1149 are column lamps, 159 low pressure suspension lamps, and 73 high pressure suspension lamps. 1937 Journal
Whitburn The new installation along Sea Lane, Whitburn, was designed by the North-Eastern Company and The British Thomson-Houston Company Limited in collaboration with Mr. Hindmarch, Surveyor to the Bolden U.D.C. The actual lighting equipment consists of BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns with chokes, condensers and 400W Mercra lamps. The roadway is 30' in width, and the average spacing between units is 150', staggered on straight stretches and on the outside of curves. The controlled cut-off of the BTH Mercra "H" lantern avoids the distracting effect of glare. This is the first installation to be erected in the north of England that complies with all the conditions laid down in the Final Report of the Ministry Of Transport. Erection was carried out by Law And Burns and Callenders' Cable And Construction Co. Ltd. were the contractors for cabling and servicing, the North-Eastern Electric Supply Company being responsible for the complete installation and maintenance. The installation was designed in collaboration with the Surveyor to Bolden Urban District Council. Visibility is particularly good on this road, which also forms a promenade joining Whitburn with Sunderland. 1938 Journal
Whitburn BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Whetstone Have signed a three year contract with the local gas undertaking. 1938 Journal
Whitchurch Have entered into a contract for gas lighting. 1938 Journal
Whitchurch The Whitchurch Parish Council have installed modern gas lighting at a traffic roundabout in their area. Two 8-mantle lamps with automatic ignition are used. Mounted on 25' standards. 1939 Journal
Whitley And Monkseaton The Whitley And Monseaton Urban District Council, on the recommendations of its Lighting Committee, is replacing the lighting in a number of streets by up-to-date gas lighting. 1937 Journal
Whitsable Have entered into a 15 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Widnes The 71 miles of public lighting in the borough of Widnes is entirely by gas, there being 1,499 public gas lamps. The annual maintenance costs amount to £4,733. 1939 Journal
Widnes Has ordered between 500 and 6,000 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Wigan Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Wigan The Wigan Corporation has renewed its contract for gas lighting in the streets under its control. About 1,930 lamps are affected and improvements in the standard of lighting are planned. 1938 Journal
Wigan There are 1954 gas lamps in commission in Wigan where the agreement between the County Borough and the Gas Departmetn has been renewed for 1939-40. 1939 Journal
Wigan Centralised control has been installed. 1939 Journal
Wigan The whole of the main roads throughout the town are now provided with a higher standard of light as the relay system of switching is in operation. Lighting of the side streets to a lower standard is progressing rapidly. No new fittings have been fixed. Temporary arrangements with tin cans and existing lanterns have been adopted with quite satisfactory results. Besides being economical, this means that it will be quite easy to convert all the fittings to normal lighting when conditions permit. When the lighting was switched on, it was like a gala night. The reaction to the lighting was most noticeable with the children, who followed the lamplighter as if he was the "Pied Piper of Hamlin." One difficulty was that the children have persisted in congregating in the streets which have been lighted, which has been dangerous to traffic, so one lamp in each side street has been adapted. There is universal satisfaction with the lighting of the streets and more people are thronging to the centre of the town. 1944 Journal
Wigston Have entered into a 10 year contract for gas street lighting. 1936 Advert
Willenhall Willenhall Urban District Council have entered into a five-year contract for gas lighting on main roads in the district and have also renewed the agreement with the local gas undertaking for the lighting of subsidiary roads. In all a total of 572 lamps is in use. The lighting on the main roads is to be raised to a higher standard. 1939 Journal
Willesden Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Willesden By 1937, 299 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed 1937 Advert
Willesden Have installed the original BTH Mercra H lantern. 1937 Advert
Willesden Cited as a town which could turn off all its lighting in the event of an air raid. This was put to C. W. Johnson (Under-Secretary Of State at the Home Office) during the APLE's London meeting in November 1939 to discuss the "black-out" 1940 Journal
Wimbledon Philips Philora lamps have been used in installations. 1937 Advert
1937 Advert
Wimbledon As a result of satisfactory experience with sodium lighting, Hartfield Road has been lit by 140W Philips Philora sodium lamps in 527/780 "Lineal" lamps supplied by Holophane. They are mounted 26' high and spaced 121' apart, the overhang being 4'. In addition, several busy roads have been lit by sodium lighting. The schemes were designed and erected under the direction of A. E. McKenzie, Esq., M.I.E.E., M.I.Mech. E., Chief Engineer and Manager of the Corporation Electricity Undertaking. Hartfield road is used as a "by-pass" around the Wimbledon shopping centre and carries a great deal of traffic. It is also a bus route. 1939 Advert
1939 Journal
1939 Journal
Winchelsea 16 electric lamps are being erected. This is the first public lighting in the village since oil lamps were discontinued many years ago. 1937 Journal
Windermere The Urban Council are considering a proposal to convert the whole of the urban street lighting to gas. The council's Highway COmmittee have recommended the acceptance of a quotation of £900 per annum for gas lighting and maintenance, and £1100 for gas standards. 1937 Journal
Windsor The Town Council have approved a scheme for lighting the principle streets of the borough with mercury vapour lamps. 1937 Journal
Windsor That discharge lamps should be employed for lighting the principle streets of the town has been approved in principle by the Town Council. 1937 Journal
Windsor BTH Mercra "H" Lanterns have been installed.

1939 Advert
Windsor The Town Council have decided to carry out a scheme to improve street lighting. The capital cost is estimated at £4,130 whilst the annual charge will be approximately £1,296. The scheme will be spread over a period of three years to include Victoria Street, William Street, Clarence Road, Dedworth Road (to the Wolf public house), a part of Datchet Road, and St. Leonard's Road. The type of lighting is that recommended by the MOT for use on all traffic routes. Mercury vapour discharge lamps are to be used at a mounting height of 25'. 1939 Journal
1939 Journal
Wing Wing Parish Council have signed a five year contract with the local gas undertaking. A number of existing lamsp are being displaced by new units. (May have been delayed/cancelled due to the war). 1939 Journal
Winsford A five year agreement for gas lighting has been arranged for Winsford and district. As present there are 416 lamps. 1939 Journal
Wirral A long-term programme on street lighting, costing over £7,000 is to be embarked upon. The scheme will be spread over a period of five years. It is proposed to provide a total of 541 lamps, the cost of standards and fittings being £7,222. 1939 Journal
Witley (Surrey) The local authority has entered into a contract for the lighting by gas. 1939 Journal
Wittering ELECO Discharge lighting. 1936 Advert
Woking 600 lamps in Woking have been illuminated to the new standard. Those in the town itself, which are over the overhead suspended type, have been fitted with 25W lamps. The remaining roads, where there are 10' columns, are fitted with 10W lamps, slightly darkened with stain. There is no doubt the public is very impressed with the lighting, despite its low intensity. 1944 Journal
Wokingham Has entered into a 3-year contract for gas street lighting. 1937 Journal
Wokingham The Wokingham Berks Lighting Committee have received a report from the borough surveyor on the probable saving which would be effected by the substitution of Newbridge Igniters, as the gas consumption for by-passes during the year amounted to 641,000 cubic feet costing £144 5s., and the cost of providing igniters amounted to £137 7s. 2d. It was agreed that, as an experiment, the 14 all-night lamps be fitted with igniters. 1939 Journal
Wolverhampton A section of the Wolverhampton-Birmingham main road is relit by Parkinson Maxill gas lamps on Adastra columns by Poles Limited. The columns are 29'8" high and are fitted with "Vesta" brackets with an outreach of 4'6". The columns are hot galvanised inside and out, and stove-enamelled in alternative colours of cream and light Brunswick green. This installation is notable as electric lighting is replaced by gas. 1936 Advert
Wolverhampton Electricity will be installed in the Walsall Street area at a cost of £514. Electric street lighting is also to be installed on the Muchall Manor Estate at a cost of £423. 1939 Journal
Wolverhampton Is trying out the modified war-time street lighting in various streets. 1940 Journal
Wombwell Between 50 and 99 standard industry gas fittings have been ordered for converting existing gas installations to BS ARP/37 for war-time starlight lighting. 1940 Journal
1940 Journal
Wombwell Wombwell Gas Department's installation of "starlights," 30 of the central type in the main street and 30 of the footpath type, has been the subject of much favourable local comment. 1940 Journal
Wood Green Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 160 GEC Watford lanterns with 400W MA/V lamps were installed. 1935 Catalogue
Woolwich Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Woolwich By 1937, 183 GEC Difractor Lanterns have been installed 1937 Advert
Woolwich The whole of the borough lighting is controlled from central points by cascades of contactors which are operated by light actuated apparatus. Street lighting is under the control of the Works Committee. Mr. H. W. Tee, M.Inst.C.E. the Borough Engineer, the Electricity Department, and Mr. F. F. Elliott, M.I.E.E., A.M.I.Mech.E the Borough Electrical Engineer were among the first to give consideration to light actuated methods for the control of street lighting. 1938 Journal
Woolwich It is proposed, as an experiment, to install temporarily six 400W mercury vapour high-pressure lamps of the cut-off type in Sidcup Road, Eltham, at an estimated cost of £200. The lamps would be suspended at a height of 25' from columns in the centre of the proposed 5' verge between the dual carriageways and each lamp would light both carriageways. 1939 Journal
Woolwich AEI fluorescent lighting has been installed. 1960 Catalogue
Worcester The Electricity Committee has recommended the Council to authorise the expenditure of £9,500 on a ripple control system for controlling street lighting from a central point. It is estimated that quite apart from its value in case of emergency, the installation of the system will effect a saving of £850 per annum on present methods. 1938 Journal
Worcester The City Council approved the purchase of a ripple control equipment for street lighting, estimated cost being £9,500. By adoption of this system it is estimated that switching and cleaning costs will be reduced, effecting a total saving of £850 per annum. 1938 Journal
Worksop Pioneer installation of mercury vapour lamps (MA) between 1933 and 1935. 1935 Catalogue
Worksop Progress has been made with street lighting in accordance with BS/ARP 37 along most of the main roads and the side roads. 1940 Journal
Worsley Metrovick sodium lamps have been supplied. 1939 Advert
Worsley Sodium discharge lighting is to be provided along Manchester Road at an estimated cost of £3652. 1939 Journal
Worsley Interchange. First installation of catenary lighting in the UK. Caternary Lighting On The Great West Road, 1974
Worthing The Worthing Corporation first adopted Philora sodium lighting in 1934. Satisfaction with the scheme led to a steady extension of its use. P. E. Harvey, Esq. O.B.E. A.M.I.C.E., the Engineer and Surveyor, was responsible for the design and installation of the scheme. 1939 Advert
Worthing Have installed Philips Philora lamps i.e. low-pressure sodium. 1938 Journal
Worthing A new scheme has been installed along Warrent Road. Type 1075 Reflector Lanterns, manufactured by BLEECO were mounted at 25' high and 150' apart. 140W Philoa lamps were used. 1939 Advert
Worthing One of the pioneer seaside towns using concrete columns. Concrete was preferred as it resisted the corrosive effects of the seaside environment. 1939 Journal
Wotton-Under-Edge Up-to-date gas lighting has replaced an electrical installation which has operated for the last seven years in Wotton-Under-Edge. The number of lamps is 77. 1939 Journal
Wrexham The Borough Electrical Engineer has assured the Council that the new war-time lighting will be placed in commission as early as possible. 1940 Journal
Wymondham Has ordered between 50 and 99 "starlight" street lighting fittings for converting gas lanterns. 1940 Journal
Yarm The whole town is light by electric lighting by 1937. 1937 Advert
Yeovil Have entered into a gas contract. About 670 lamps are in commission. 1938 Journal
York The first public lighting in the streets of York dates from the middle of the 18th Century. It was carried out under a special Act Of Parliament which stated the number of lamps which were to be affixed in the principle streets of the City. Oil lamps were specified and the Act provided "all such lamps should be lighted at sunset every evening and kept burning till twilight every morning from the first day of October to the thirty-first day of March inclusive, in every year, and 'during the week of the annual horse races at or near York.'" 1938 Journal
York At the end of 1937, there were 2,494 electric lamps in York of wattages varying from 150 to 400. There were less than 400 non-electric lamps in the city. 1938 Journal
York The City has taken full advantage of the new standard of lighting permitted under the Home Office Order (1944, Dim-Out). All lighting is 0.02 foot candles to remain lit during alerts or other warnings. The methods are: Electricity: 25' mounting height, 15W pearl lamps, screened against projection of light above the horizontal by blacking out the refractor; 14' mounting height, 15W lamps and part blackened on the underside screened by blackened refractor against projection of light above the horizontal; 11' mounting height, as 14', but screened by reversal and modification of baffle of old 'starlight' fitting; 1,500 lit on the 17th September and to date 1,800; Gas: Majority are square lanterns, the side glasses are painted black to within 7" of the base, the remainder being left as clear glass, horizontal base painted opaque white. 150 lamps lit initially with 430 completed. 1944 Journal